Sunday, 28 May 2023

Just You

I got to sit down late  tonight
It’s was  a long day
A mixture of a friends’s personal problems kept me busy by phone  and the need to have fresh air after a day shift kept me going still
At 10 pm I was walking the dogs down the lane and it was lovely to see that the bats are back , flitting like mini devil  shadows.under the one lane lamp 
Roger had never seen bats before and he barked quietly at them , not sure that barking was allowed
It is warm tonight too   and there was  no moon 
A fox was screaming  too and the dogs were on point quietly  listening ….spring/summer fox calls are usually ones in response to territory rather than romance ( these are in winter) and dogs were frightened by their alien make up.
Hey ho ……I had no one to tell of such treasures tonight 
Just you

31 comments:

  1. Sounds like a lovely night. Sometimes the ordinary can be so extraordinary.

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  2. Nelliegrace10:30 pm

    Thank you, John, a vivid word picture. Sleep well.
    Nelliegrace

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  3. Joan (Devon)10:49 pm

    You'll always have us to tell and we'll always be here to listen. Nature never sleeps. Sweet dreams.

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  4. Thank you for sharing. The sights and sounds of wildlife are always interesting and with each season their rituals change. Very good observations in this post.

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  5. SueJay11:06 pm

    Yep, we’re always here, even though we don’t always comment. Lovely quiet night here in Cornwall too.

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  6. Yesterday I followed the pathway below the silver birch trees - where my Scruffy led me - at the top of the hill above the oak a buzzard drifted above us x ๐ŸŒ„

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    1. ๐Ÿ™ˆ๐Ÿ™‰๐Ÿ™Š

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  7. lovely treasures. Thank you for sharing.

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  8. I don't know the sound of a fox call. You make me wish I did

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    1. A fox call can often sound as though someone's being murdered, scary on the first time of hearing!

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  9. A fox call is particularly eerie IMO. The first time I heard one I wondered if it was a cougar. Then I spotted the fox calling in the field east of the house.

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  10. And here we are. Listening.

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  11. I'm so glad you shared these beautiful treasures with us. You paint such vivid scenes using so few words.
    Sadly, we no longer hear foxes calling at night.
    Sleep well, John dear.

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  12. Thank you John, for a New Zealander, this is a vivid word picture of a world quite different from my own. Here we live right next to a large urban wildlife sanctuary, and will hear the calls of Tui and other native birds. In the evening we will have Kaka visiting as they make their way to their nesting spots. They're large birds with hooked beaks and can be aggressive towards other garden birds. It is a privilege to hear and see them - only a few years ago they were never sighted in the city.
    We have no wild foxes here, but stoats and weasels, both imported, have devastated the native bird populations unfortunately, and rabbits are a huge pest for high country farmers. It's a very different eco system here and I love hearing about yours. Beatrix Potter, and Kenneth Grahame being our only point of contact with the wild world of the UK.!

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  13. We are always glad to read your evocative writing!

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  14. I'm walking along with you, smiling!

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  15. A lovely way to spend an early summer's evening.

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  16. in my family we think seeing bats is a sign of good luck and the bark of a fox means fortune. May it be so for you.

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  17. Barbara Anne4:47 am

    A lovely picture of your part of the world, unique to tonight. Ta.

    Hugs!

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  18. You paint a pretty picture of a summer night. It's like we're all walking with you

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  19. And you tell it so well. Thanks. xx

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  20. Josephine from Deventer7:23 am

    Thank you for sharing! That is what I miss living in a lovely old town. You cannot have it all, but your description gives me a hint of the wildlife out there.

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  21. Treasures indeed.
    I love Roger's reaction

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  22. I love seeing bats. I see them rarely here in our part of London but they occasionally come around.

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  23. Thanks for sharing your walk with us.

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  24. Just catching up with your posts, I was sorry to read that Albert has died. A constant in your life for so many years, you're bound to keenly feel his absence.
    Today's post hit home, it's the ordinary things in nature and life that make us realise we're seeing them alone and have nobody to tell when we return to the house.
    Know that your readers value your words John and a virtual hug from me, another who lives alone now.

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  25. Thank you for sharing John x

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  26. weaver8:32 am

    I think you need a hug John - so here's a metaphorical one from me - and one for Roger too - I expect he's missing Albert - he didrather watch over him towards the end didn't he?xx

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