Tuesday, 23 November 2021

Plan

 


 I never expected to be working full time at 60 years old let alone at 65 or older
(I’m seven months from reaching 60)
And to keep my home safe  and my mortgage paid I will need to be in employment until I am almost 70
Nursing full time is physically not really an option for me I know, so recently I’ve had to seriously review my work future
( an odd thing to say seeing that I’m already in receipt of my nursing pension) 

I’ve decided to complete my counselling degree. 
Back in the 1990s I completed several counselling courses at Sheffield Uni but too much time has gone by for those to be of any use to me now, so I have to push through the degree from the start 
I may be able to incorporate study days from work given the nature of the course but we shall see but the idea in principle seems doable to me and is something that taps into my strengths and abilities 

Another door is perhaps opening 

I’ve always been a late starter…….

146 comments:

  1. Do you mean counselling in the psychological sense? I only know you from this blog, but I have a feeling you'd be very good at that. I wish the best for you.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Fabulous idea! You will do so well and be of help to so many. Starting over, and more than once,,,so impressive. Best wishes in this endeavor.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have to be realistic..the physical toll of nursing full-time is Emmense especially with long shifts unsociable hours and nights.
      My divorce mediator said glinly that her father worked until he was 80
      Not as a frigging nurse he didn't I told her

      Delete
  3. What a great idea! You've acquired so many skills over the years to help. I hope the plans work out for you. xx

    ReplyDelete
  4. It's never too late to start anything! Go for it!! xxx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I've got to be pragmatic
      I need to reduce my long days. Up my hourly rate and reduce the physical stressors

      Delete
  5. You already have so many counselling skills - I recall you were a Samaritan once, weren't you? You'd be brilliant. I wonder if some of those 'prior knowledge and experiences' might be credits towards your Counselling degree? Worth looking in to.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I doubt they will but thanks for the vote of confidence

      Delete
  6. I think that you have great empathy, kindness and a sense of humour. Your people skills seem to be excellent and your life experiences useful. Also the nursing background is invaluable. If I needed counselling I would definitely wish for a counsellor like you. Excellent plan!

    ReplyDelete
  7. Congratulations, wonderful work, it's beautiful so much and good idea on site.
    បាការ៉ាត់អនឡាញ _Baccarat Online

    ReplyDelete
  8. You will sail through that. You have the talent. Go for it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Just the.costs that may be a sticking plaster

      Delete
  9. I think you will be a wonderful councillor John x

    ReplyDelete
  10. You will be great at it John-I have seen a few and I end up humouring them as they just dish out text book and I don't like to diasppoint them-but I know you will be good-you have great empathy-Go for it x

    ReplyDelete
  11. Will you be able to get any help with the cost of courses?

    ReplyDelete
  12. JennyP9:04 am

    As a retired nurse I know you will be brilliant. All your life experiences will be such an asset. Best wishes.

    ReplyDelete
  13. A great idea. A perfect transition for you, your skills, and your personality.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well I will.be playing to my strengths

      Delete
  14. Why not choose a fun work for a change?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's great thinking outside the box, Rachel. Any suggestions?

      Realistically, poor "old" John does have to build on the professional material he's accumulated so far. Though, in today's speak, you will be encouraged to explore "transferable" skills to change saddle. Like, say, a butcher taking up needle work. Both pretty intricate, I'd say. Not that needle work sells at profit.

      U

      Delete
    2. Fun work! ? Any suggestions ???
      I need to.pay bills remember xx

      Delete
    3. Write your book... Monetise your blog... Begin counselling freelance with no qualifications needed (formal qualifications in such things are largely nonsense and institutional scams, in my ever-humble opinion), and you would probably be amazed at how many people will pay just for a friendly and helpful ear

      Delete
    4. What about getting a couch with a hole in and do feet-not hard skin,bunions and callouses nasty stuff but just oils and a bit of M dabbs and relaxation tape in the background"Come and relax awhile and let me take care of your accroutrements")or similar x

      Delete
    5. or-"Let me carry your cares away on a cloud whilst caressing your appendages?"x(hands and fee-no bumps a daisy)x

      Delete
    6. People pay good money to get their feet nibbled at by fish in a tank - hard to believe but true, so... therapeutic foot licks by a boxer dog in Trelawnyd's bijou art studio and coffee cottage...?

      Delete
    7. I was indeed thinking outside the box. It wasn't a flippant comment. I meant perhaps a job not related to death, pain, suffering. A different sphere completely for your wellbeing. When I left a long career in financial services I opted for a job in a totally different field during retirement. I don't see that freelance counselling is necessarily a guaranteed bill payer unless you get a good early break into a lucrative vein.

      Delete
    8. There's a story in our local paper coincidentally today about a woman who has given up her career to work with her first love, dogs.

      Delete
    9. 2 weeks ago Victor Meldrew was astonished to find out the therapist who he visited for foot treatment,relaxation and massage was using her nipple(he never knew apparently as he was So relaxed-eyes closed far away)he thought she was using her finger x

      Delete
    10. Rachel, I didn’t think you were being
      My sister changed her job last year and is loving her gardening
      To me counselling is something I know I will be good at
      ….and I need to pick something that pays th3 bills

      Delete
    11. I’m too old to be a zoo keeper

      Delete
    12. Andrew, points taken xxxx

      Delete
    13. I don't understand you.

      Delete
    14. I always wanted to be a zoo keeper as a child

      Delete
  15. I bet one of your Sheffield tutors was Paul S.
    I got a bus pass at 60. Now you have to wait until 67-ish. Not that there are any convenient buses round here to use it on. They're worth a fortune in London.

    ReplyDelete
  16. this is an excellent field to move into. My aunt has since covid gone self employed and has more clients all over who she works with via skype, zoom etc. She is able to work constant shifts and has seen a great rise in people who want evening sessions. She has even taken on a few employers who are using her services to help with the mental health of their teams whilst transitioning to working post lockdowns. Mental health assistance is a valuable service. Good for you that you are planning. I think this is an excellent move. Good luck

    ReplyDelete
  17. A friend of mine retrained as a counsellor/therapist and now works from home - his consultations are online and he specialises in work with men. Seems to make a decent living from it. I'm not sure he took a degree in it. I have considered doing it myself (almost 60 too - gulp) but so many other things going on personally that it's finding the time and energy to commit. Good luck John, I'm sure if you decide to undertake the course you'll make a success of it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I’m getting a nice positive feeling from yours and other comments

      Delete
  18. I think you would make a great counsellor. Your varied professional career and your time working for The Samaritans mean that your listening skills have been well-honed over the years.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I’m open to home my bad habits too

      Delete
  19. Before you know it, you'll be getting paid to do what you do already!
    Great stuff

    ReplyDelete
  20. I think it's a great idea. One, it'll give you an edge in the profession. And two, it'll make you excited again about your job. Not to mention that it'll may bring some extra money. Do it.

    XOXO

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think it will make me excited
      And I will not be as tired

      Delete
  21. that's a brilliant idea and seems like a perfect fit for you. it gives you something to look forward to.

    ReplyDelete
  22. What an excellent idea! I left my "main" job (librarian in civil service) at 59 and for the last 10 years have been tutoring and lecturing. I'm now planning to focus on writing. It's never too late, and I'm sure you would be very good at counselling - and writing, come to that. Good luck with it all. Jan xx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I’m not very good at taking chances.
      I like to work with certainties

      Delete
  23. You will be excellent counselling people. Like others here have said, it does seem like a perfect fit for you.

    May all doors open for you to to receive and achieve all that you will need, so that you can make a career of counselling as soon as possible.

    ReplyDelete
  24. Go for it John. I went from nursing at 55yrs into training and stayed until i was 68yrs.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes the physicality of nursing is my sticking point. It's becoming harder to be on my feet physically for 12 hours

      Delete
    2. Sorry John that mine comes up as unknown. Sylvia x

      Delete
  25. You will be amazing, with the work you have done, the volunteer work you have done, it is a perfect fit. I interviewed a counselor recently who is 79 and still very much enjoying his work - a few less hours as he approaches 80.

    ReplyDelete
  26. Oh, interesting! And bravo to you for being open to new things! You seem like you'd be a good counselor.

    ReplyDelete
  27. It is hard to accept things as age makes things we took for granted harder to achieve. I to am having to reconsider my working future as 'the snap' has brought home the fact that the physical side of my work is becoming a tad harder. I had thought of selling my body but the disappointment of clients would be hard to bear...

    ReplyDelete
  28. Hi John , I am in a similar situation about wanting to do a Counselling degree.
    Am 62 yrs now- retired from NHS at 55yrs. I have looked into it but it would take me years - despite having been SRN -RMN - Midwife + Health Visitor trained.
    They do not seem to recognise such experience.
    I also am a Samaritan Volunteer Listener.

    The costs involved put me off - though now I live in Wales it may be doable.
    Look forward to hearing about your progress

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Watch this space...financially I think it may be hard

      Delete
  29. Good idea John! I think you would make a brilliant counsellor.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I've had enough practical experience

      Delete
  30. Sounds like a good plan, John. Good luck with it!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well the cost my be prohibitive
      I'm finding out this week what's possible

      Delete
  31. Hope it works out for you, John. Best of luck!

    ReplyDelete
  32. Start ramping up for retirement now. I worked until I was 66 to get my full retirement benefits by both the social security and a lump sum company benefits. During the run up to retirement I paid off ALL debt (house mortage, vehicles,etc.). My wife and I are in our mid 70's and enjoying our debt free life. You have the time to do the same. Best of luck.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm almost straight....

      Delete
    2. "I'm almost straight" ... eh?

      Delete
    3. Financially not sexually
      Sexuality I'm as bent as a safety pin

      Delete
    4. Phew. That's a relief. I thought I had fallen through some portal into mad parallel world where nothing makes sense (oh no, wait a minute, that's this world...)

      Delete
    5. Welcome to my world

      Delete
    6. Hahaha! Bent as a safety pin... you had me chortling. You would make a brilliant counsellor. I have been to a few over the years and know the ones I like. I hate it when people try to put words in my mouth... with your Samaritans experience you would be excellent.

      Jo in Auckland

      Delete
  33. Expecting to be retired by 60? Welcome to the real world. I worked full time until a few weeks ago (when I hit 69) and I made boodles of money doing it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. If I knew before I retired my marriage would fail I would never have retired . I would have paid more into my pension and wouldn't have lost 20% fee for retiring at 55

      Delete
  34. Barbara Anne2:52 pm

    I wonder if your life experiences, education, and work would count as you work toward this your counselling degree? From your blog, I'd say you were well qualified already! Wishing you success.

    Hugs!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Barbara Anne4:34 pm

      Oh, and you should definitely write your book, taken from blog posts and your other experiences as it's bound to be a best seller and make you independently wealthy, doncha know?

      Hugs!

      Delete
    2. I’ve got a lot of thinking to do

      Delete
  35. I’m so happy about your decision! I’ve worried about the physical toll from your current job. How long will the process take? You will be so great in this job! Its an investment that will last decades if you choose to work that long. Happy Thanksgiving from Suz in Los Angrles.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you suz
      The process is over three years

      Delete
    2. Three years will fly by. Especially noticing this approaching 60 (damn where does time go!)

      Jo in Auckland

      Delete
  36. I too have to work until my late 60s at the earliest. Like you I work in the NHS so understand exactly where you are coming from. Good luck!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. VC , it’s nice to think I’m not alone

      Delete
  37. You are being wise John. You would be a good and sensitive counsellor.
    Would a degree be the only way in?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think so given the length of time It’s been since my original training

      Delete
    2. That is unfortunate, you have so much experience to start with

      Delete
  38. I work as a counsellor in a school working with the pupils. It's is a vocation not a job, you will love it

    ReplyDelete
  39. That certainly sounds like something that you would be well qualified to do. If you are going to make a change look into all aspects of it and even talk to others that are counselors. At this point in your life you want to make sure you will enjoy what you are doing. I have so many regrets about past jobs that I did for the money and not the enjoyment. It wears on you. I planned to retire at 65 but threw in the towel at 63. My income is reduced but that's okay.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It all depends on my health which has t been good as of late …..some of this is worrying

      Delete
  40. I knew someone who did counciling online and charged a fee-think they joined an organisation thingy first x

    ReplyDelete
  41. Anonymous7:29 pm

    from what I *know* about you, you seem innately qualified to be a counsellor. The possibilities as to areas you could utilize your skills...almost endless. Foremost of your many qualifications (imo) being your deeply caring heart. I hope you will find a way to accomplish your new goal! Susan M

    ReplyDelete
  42. Nursing is not for the faint hearted, at any age. But the older you are the worse it gets physically. It can be a physically hard job, despite all the mod cons, hoists, PAT slides and so on.
    I was able with a little financial juggling to retire early at 55 before I was totally broken. Maybe you could go part time later on. Over paying your mortgage even by a few pounds can be a great help as well.
    Good Luck

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I find the PPE the worst thing to cope with , it tires me than anything else

      Delete
    2. An apron, a mask and gloves? My dentist has always worn these throughout hours of work, 2 and 3 hours root canals without breaks. Surgeons? PPE for my niece's husband was like a space suit when he was in Covid ICU. He slept on a trolley and never left the hospital. Hospice work is not the same is it? Peopke come for their last days in peace.

      Delete
    3. It's not a competition over who suffered/suffers the worst. It's all relevant to who you are and how you cope with things.
      Nursing is a mental and physical job. But it drains your soul sometimes.
      At our age (older) there is also a build up of grief from everything you've seen over the years. The first death I dealt with as a qualified nurse was a four year old girl with Measles/Encephalitis. Her parents were anti-vaxxers. Forty years ago it was also a thing. It still haunts me.

      Delete
    4. Good points Shelly.

      Delete
  43. I am all for that "doors" principle John - think it is a brilliant idea.

    ReplyDelete
  44. Sounds like a wonderful idea John you have made a difference in so many peoples lives during the years through your patient thoughtful nature, I say go for it it is never to late. Hopefully there are government programs that can help with the cost.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think I earn too much for support but perhaps support with study leave with work may be useful

      Delete
  45. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I get this Tom, and I understand , but nursing is relentless
      Especially as nights and weekend work as well as long days are antisocial as well as tiring .
      PPE will always be with us too

      Delete
    2. Maybe you forget my grand daughter is a neo-natal and paediatric nurse who has to deal with babies dying and their bereaved parents on a daily basis. Her hair is falling out. Literally. I don't think you understand quite how fortunate you are.

      Delete
    3. I haven’t forgotten
      But I don’t get the point of this comment
      I have worked with psychiatric patients, those disabled by spinal injury , those in intensive care and those and the end of life
      And have done so for 38 years
      Physically , it’s will be time for a change

      That is my point, I’m not complaining of being a nurse , I’m just physically tired

      Delete
  46. Just keep opening those new doors.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I will. Try
      I was once criticised for saying I feel old when I referred to working as a nurse in my late 50s.
      The person said , “I know a lot of people your age who do fine and don’t complain “
      PPE took its toll on me last year,
      Unsocial hours do too
      Nights, and back to back long days don’t help
      And my recent illness and bad health has reminded me just how precarious things can be

      Delete
    2. When I did "Careers choices" back in the 70's as I was about to leave school I was given 3 choices of occupations, secretary (couldn't type) Teacher (I would have them hung up on pegs around the class) and Nurse. Now nursing appealed to me to a point, I knew I wasn't big on dealing with tendon (y) things, blood was a bit iffy but I felt I could cope. What decided for me that I couldn't be a nurse was the unsocial hours, the rate of pay and never ending shifts. It was then I decided it isn't an occupation but a vocation. Years later I became a support worker, it's lovely work, it suits my personality, I get to choose my hours, after 26 years I am finally being paid a wage that helps pay my bills and I can use my caring nature to do good. So not nursing but caring... on my terms not a Health boards terms.

      I admire everything you do as a nurse and wish you all the best for your counselling change.

      Jo in Auckland

      Delete
  47. I retired last year afterc41 years in NHS.I now work 8 hours a week for an charity as befriending coordinator for an elderly charity. After 4months lazing around (yes I'm lucky ) I now do a days work as agency practice nurse. I can choose my day hours and where to work. Must be mad. How you manage it physically I do not know, I have a bad back and dodgey hip. You would make a great counsellor . Go for it.

    ReplyDelete
  48. PPE is a nightmare, dry scratchy throat thro bellowing at people, sweaty hands. However getting covid far worse.

    ReplyDelete
  49. I also think you would be an excellent counselor. With your broad nursing experience you could alternative teach nursing at a uni. It all depends on what you prefer. Often employers pay for education that awards a degree.

    ReplyDelete
  50. All the very best wishes for success in switching careers. I too think you would make a very good counselor.
    ( and a best selling book author)!

    ReplyDelete
  51. At the risk of just repeating what has been said already, this would be something you would be well suited for based on all we see here and how compassionate you are. A lot of my friends and family have suggested that as a retirement career for me but I think I'm too old to get back into school, you have the head start for that. We do have to think about what we do and for how much longer as we get older so we can live and enjoy our older ages (I'm 56, I'm getting there, ha). But I have a few ideas in mind for when I can't deal with my career anymore. Same for 2nd Man (I'm encouraging him to become a baker but for now, we need his job too, ha). You'll never know if you don't try so I say go for it and see how things happen. We must have faith that the Universe is unfolding as it should!

    ReplyDelete
  52. To your fans who are urging you to write a best seller--my understanding is very few authors make much money , only a few BIG names. And it is not steady income.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lizzy, John will never know if he doesn't try. I have written many books, some of which have made me tens of thousands of pounds each while some have made very little, but none of them could be called best-sellers. I have also made the bulk of my living writing articles over the past 30 and more years, so there are options out there for writers, and John does know how to write well (subject to proof-reading for what his clumsy fingers can sometimes do unchecked :).

      Delete
  53. I really appreciate your professional approach.These are pieces of very useful information that will be of great use for me in future.
    Live Football_បាល់ផ្សាយបន្តផ្ទាល់

    ReplyDelete
  54. I read that talking therapy may help me-I phoned my Dr arranged for one to see me at the practice-it looked very straightforward for her-"What was bothering me-Did I sleep too much or not enough-food?-suicidal?-now rate 1 to 10 how much a certain scenario would distress"I went twice then couldn't be arsed she was useless-easy peasy for her and she would have got paid x

    ReplyDelete
  55. Just a thought. You are very eloquent, with a beautiful syrupy voice, you could get work doing voice overs. I could listen to you reading a whole book. What about making some demo tapes, or cd's or however they record them now, and sending them off to the people who make talking books. Try the RNIB.

    ReplyDelete
  56. You can't go on for another 3 years, you need to make an interim change.

    ReplyDelete
  57. I think a career change will be good for you. You have years of experience dealing with the physical side of people and of the mental side with your Samaritans work. There is no doubt that you would make a great counsellor.

    ReplyDelete
  58. Have you any opportunities for a career switching into teaching? Here in the States we have a shortage of math and science teachers. Some school systems encourage older adults with real life experience in these fields to get a license to serve as substitute teachers. Then, if they find it agreeable, they are supported in obtaining a license to teach their specific subject. Strongly suspect you have much to share with nursing students...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree. Maybe nurse teacher or practice nurse at a GP surgery? There must be other less physical jobs with better hours which will use your many talents, even if the pay isn't any better. I hope you figure something out. xx

      Delete
  59. You should apply for a scholarship so at least your needed education would be free.I saw some online.-Mary

    ReplyDelete
  60. I like your blog,I sincerely hope that your blog a rapid increase in
    traffic density,which help promote your blog and we hope that your blog is being updated.
    រ៉ូឡែត កាស៊ីណូអនឡាញ

    ReplyDelete
  61. I think you would be good at counselling.

    ReplyDelete
  62. MarisAna I completely agree with you. I was just going to write much the same thing myself.

    Jo in Auckland

    ReplyDelete
  63. Sounds perfect for you to me, good luck. Bev

    ReplyDelete
  64. I can't imagine how physically and mentally taxing your job is now. I too think you'd make a good counsellor. All the very best

    ReplyDelete

I love all comments Except abusive ones from arseholes