Friday, 3 August 2018

The Power Of A Film Scene


I was asked recently just why I love the cinema so much.
The answer is a complex one, but I think the main power of film is that it often captures tiny moments in time, moments that we so often never ever able to see and understand.
I was reminded of such a scene last night.
The movie Hostiles has one of the most powerful endings of any film I have ever seen. Shot in slow motion we see the film's traumatised anti hero ( Christian Bale) slowly walking down the platform of a western train station as a train steams away. The audience knows that on the train is an equally traumatised Rosamund Pike  which whom Bale has had a relationship with , and only minutes before had the opportunity in joining for a new life away from the brutality of the Indian wars. Bale rejected the chance of salvation , his expression sort of indicating that he will return to his life of violence and savagery, but as the train moves away, right at the very final moment of the film we witness him stepping on the back of the train to physical and mental safety.
It's a lovely moment.

Like I said last night I was reminded of such a pivotal cinematic moment.
Winnie and Albert and George and I were over in the field checking on the ponies. I'm especially fond of the little gelding who is quite over friendly at times and I love blowing into his nose, taking in  that musty nutty smell horses often possess.
We were standing not far from the little cemetery behind the church and I'd already noticed that a young couple were sitting on the grass in front of a grave. The young woman, had long blonde hair and was drinking from a small bottle. I heard her laugh and watched her for a second as she gathered up some flowers to lean against a gravestone.
It felt as though she was visiting a loved one , informally and with a relaxed warmth.
And as glanced over again past the curve of the gelding's back.
I saw the girl lean over and gently kiss the top of the gravestone.

A little cinematic moment, captured in my head forever.

56 comments:

  1. I wonder what was in that little bottle.

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    1. Beer in a churchyard? Oh my Lord, that's worse than pooping hounds!

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    2. We have moments like this when the kids and grands visit my late father and husband. My Dad always gets a shot of Drambui along with his chat and kisses/hugs. My hubby gets a cigarette and they tell him his problems. He was always the family "therapist."

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    3. It was the couple's relaxed nature that made me watch

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  2. What a sweet moment in time x

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  3. I love capturing these moments, far better to have them in your memory than stored in your phone's photo memory bank 🙂

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  4. A lovely snap shot at the graveyard.
    Ps I’m going to beat a path to the cinema, interesting review and Rosamund Pike rarely disappoints.

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    1. Review
      https://disasterfilm.blogspot.com/2018/01/hostiles-study-of-ptsd.html

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  5. Occasionally people surprise us; in a nice way.

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  6. This is why people shouldn't jump to instant conclusions, but many of them do!

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  7. We see the wonders around you, when we take time to see them,

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  8. Trains in a movie. It sounds interesting and lonely railway platforms are great metaphors. One would only drink from a small bottle if there was not a large bottle available...or there was a second small bottle.

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    1. Yes, railways are synononmous with hellos and goodbyes

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  9. Gorgeous! You could add the little scene to a screenplay you might write one day? You seen enough fillums to know what would constitute a winner.

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  10. What a lovely moment to have witnessed. I look forward to your film review.

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    1. https://disasterfilm.blogspot.com/2018/01/hostiles-study-of-ptsd.html

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  11. I love the unexpected. I am usually tangled with expectations and I LOVE it when I am wrong.

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  12. It is funny, this is the first post that popped up in my reader after we just finished watching a movie where I said to the other half, it is a proper movie, isn't it? Everything about it was so cinematic. It is an experience, stepping into another world for a short time, where anything is possible.

    The movie was one I had never seen before - I am a bit late getting on the train, as it were - Harry Potter and the Philosophers Stone. True movie magic.

    There might be a blog question for another day - your blog readers favourite movie moments. ;)

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  13. I love movies and books and think we are all fond of a good story, either on the page or on the screen. I always think a good book is one where I can see the movie of it in my head and a good movie is one where I want to go back and see it again.

    Julie Q

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  14. Lovely . . .
    And we would have never known if you hadn’t shared . . .
    Only one of the reasons I love following along with you . . .

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  15. Would it have been Flower and Produce Show day in your part of the world tomorrow, wonder if people are missing it. I'm entering stuff in one tomorrow but the weather has been a pain so don't expect to win a prize

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    1. Yes, the flower show would have taken place tomorrow

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  16. You tell a lovely tale John Gray. You describe scenes so beautifully that I can see it all in my head.

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  17. Thank you for sharing that special moment.

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  18. What a sweet moment.

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  19. Both moments that you will never forget John - and now, with their telling, neither will we.

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  20. I have read that Hostiles was a very violent movie so I won’t see it. I also heard that the acting is excellent. There are scenes in movies and life that touch us is and will never be forgotten.

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  21. Sweet! I'd buy one of your word paintings any day. Cinema. I love that word. It makes even the most mundane movie sound special.

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  22. I second Louise and Weaver, in your posts you paint amazing mental images for us to think about, remember, and enjoy!

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  23. I can understand your love of films like my love of books 'Escapism' pure and simple especially in the line of work you have done. Hope you are well

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  24. So nicely, you do paint a scene well.

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  25. It's the best thing when a film-worthy scene happens to us in real life! I've had a few of those myself.

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  26. That is beautiful John.I love it that she was natural with her deceased loved one.When my dad was 56 years of age & laying in a coffin I placed beer & fags & a bit of cash for the pub just in case he needed it x

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  27. A very touching scene indeed.

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  28. Beautiful scene, beautifully told. John you have a natural awareness, understanding and talent for telling the bits of life that matter. You really should write. Books, short stories, something. It is all there in your heart and head.

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  29. I'm not really a fan of films, I get bored too easily and so many these days are trite rubbish. I also dislike multi plex cinemas, so I don't go. But, I love reading and my escapism is through that media.

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  30. I have a feeling that we have intruded on a very personal and private moment, pity.

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    1. And celebrated it

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    2. I am intrigued by your name " the cheat " can you explain it

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    3. Anonymous10:36 am

      Not intruded... Shared
      Elsewhere from amsterdam

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  31. What a sweet observation that you captured for all of us.

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  32. I loved Hostiles! Yes, very violent, but I adore a good western. May a recommend a little book? My favorite that I've read in several years - it is called News of the World. I think it would make such a great movie! Such a poignant scene in the churchyard...

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    1. Well, I've just read that Tom Hanks has optioned the movie rights. He is not at all who I pictured as the main male character :( Maybe he won't star (it's a western)...

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  33. A lovely post, John.

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  34. You captured a lovely moment in the churchyard.

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  35. That was a wonderful moment to behold, someone still visiting the resting place of a loved one.

    And the description of the little pony is charming and delightful.

    But I can't help but be curious. What about Irene? She still thinks she's horse?


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  36. you described the last moments of the film so well. it's a scene that i'll always remember. my heart burst a little when he stepped on the train. cinematic perfection. xo janet

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  38. You have a poet's heart John...thanks for the movie review I'll look out for it. :-)

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  39. Yes... the tiny moments.

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  40. Thank you for sharing that vignette, John. Beautifully told.

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