Friday, 15 June 2018

Co-op Hillsborough

I once saw a woman in the co op in Hillsborough pay for a stranger's shopping.
I was at the back of the queue at the checkout and a rather shabby middle aged guy in front was searching and re searching  his pockets to pay for such basic tidbits as milk and bread and a tinned meat pie.
He looked pained and embarrassed
Quietly a youngish mother in front of me leaned forward and without fuss told the checkout girl to put the items on her bill.
I heard her say " it's ok .its ok"  to the shabby man, who looked as though he was about to cry
It was all over a minute later.
As she was packing her own shopping I caught her eye briefly  and smiled " That was very kind " 
I told her
" we all need a little kindness "  the woman answered before she and her children walked off...
I remember thinking just what a lovely lesion in life that woman had shared with her children that day at the checkout in Hillsborough's tired old co op

66 comments:

  1. Small acts of kindness make the world a better place.

    What a lovely and reaffirming example of good people who care still present in our world, still making the world a better place.

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    1. It's a more common thing than most of us realise

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  2. I did the same for a man in front of me about a month ago. He was short of 3 Euros and the cashier asked him to hurry up while he searched his pockets. I gave the amount but I received bad stares from a couple behind me while the cashier bowed her head and just took the money. I was very sad for the man but more for the three people.
    Greetings Maria x

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  3. We all need kindness, no matter how small they add up.

    cheers, parsnip

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  4. Beautiful. I once helped a friend with her weekly stint at the soup kitchen... I expected to see the usual collection of scammers and druggies, but was shocked to find old age pensioners, young families and folks who just came by for the companionship and didn't even eat. It opened my eyes greatly, I have to say. Kindness does go along way- you never really know about another's circumstances.

    Barb

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    1. Volunteer work should be brought into school and family homes at an early age.....

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    2. John, that would be a great idea.

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    3. Yet you only helped the one time?

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  5. We too often forget that our children are watching us....even when grown... Hugs! deb

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  6. Last week in the charity shop I sold some bedding very cheely to a man who looked rather down on his luck.

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    1. And I bet it made you feel good

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  7. A little thoughtfulness goes a long way. x

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  8. It's moment like this, catching a random act of kindness as it happens, that reaffirms my faith in humans ... all to often I despair of what some people are becoming.

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    1. I grew a little older watching it

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  9. Having both received and given unexpected kindness I'm a firm believer that what goes around comes around. Who among us knows how far reaching our influence in this world can be? Thanks for another uplifting message,Mary

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    1. It's the contact that moves the contact and the intention not the action itself

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  10. Beautiful. I've been on the receiving end of strangers' generosity, and it made a grand impact on me, so now I return the kindness whenever I can.

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  11. I grew up in rural area where everyone helped one another to plow, sow seeds, harvest, shear sheep, and to watch out for one another i.e. check on elderly folks who lived alone in the area and to take soup and bread to them. Now folks in the same area expect to be paid to help each other....sad.

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    1. Perhaps everyone needs to calm down and slow down

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  12. Kindness has brought me to tears, too, whether to myself or to others. I try to pass it along, too. It's strange; mostly when you help someone else, the rest of the people around treat you as if you are both invisible. I like that you reaffirmed that young mother's actions. I hope her children took that behavior in as well.

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    1. Brought to tears by the offer of a simple package of two cookies by a personal care worker in the hospital right after my father's stroke. I had been there from 6 a.m. to 8 p.m. every day, usually with no lunch or supper, for going on two weeks, as he needed help with everything and he wasn't getting it. that one gesture touched me greatly. Up to that point I could have been another chair in the room as far as the nurses went. I know there are many fine nurses out there (I met many in subsequent years) but the ones in that ward shouldn't have been on that career path.

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  13. Two small acts of kindness from strangers changed a shitty week to a positive finish.

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  14. Yes, shoving your hand in your pocket for a few quid to help someone is the norm as I know it around here.

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  15. I love witnessing (and participating) in scenes like that.

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  16. Be kind. Always. It costs nothing and means everything.

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  17. Nothing wrong with kindness and a little financial help. More people should pay attention to the people who are in need of some sympathy, no matter how.

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  18. Indeed, kindness does go a long way - that's, presumably, why, not that long ago, you got so heft up about some older woman taking a few seconds of your life, holding up the queue at the supermarket till, by her exchanging some niceties with the cashier. And felt so proud that you had made your displeasure clear. Quite the man. Come on, John.

    U

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    1. That was unkind Ursula and also very wrong. The woman involved wasn't elderly , she was middle aged and talking excessively about her very expensive holiday to a friend who was the cashier . . If you are going to have a go, get your facts right. I didn't ask or want you to start your usual arguements and spats here ursula . I really am not in the mood for your usual playgames

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    2. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    3. Oh that's a shame I liked that comment

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    4. Well,then...Among a group celebrating sweet folks a sour twat has arrived

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    5. I take your point, John. And I do understand that you aren't in the "mood". However, and I hope you'll forgive me, sometimes people (I don't mean you in particular) come across as holier than thou - on blogs and in their comments - which make me wonder where all the crappers of this world are hiding.

      Anyway, giving up you (and your blog) isn't exactly like giving up other addictions; so, I am afraid you'll have to make allowances till I fall silent forever. Two steps forward, one back :). I wasn't going to comment any more, good or bad - my name is mud whatever; however, I have an aversion to Hypo Crazy. And you are right: All of us should get our facts right. And if I got mine wrong then I apologize.

      U

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    6. Yes, Anon, there is always one. And then there is the one who will draw extra special attention ... Thanks. So kind.

      U

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    7. Holier than thou?
      I was talking about someone else's nice behaviour

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  19. It is stories like these John that make us believe that there is still good in the world. It is so easy to believe that nobody cares any more and as you have just illustrated = it is just not true.

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  20. I very much approve of that. Even if someone is a drunk or junkie, they still need help to survive until they can no longer survive - even with the help of others.

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    1. Yes....it doesn't take much of an effort

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  21. A lesson in life, the like of which we learn at our mothers knee...

    LX

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  22. I'm a great believer in kindness - in fact, it probably does more for the giver than the receiver don't you think? Pay it forward is the motto to live by!

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  23. I was taught: 'never look down on someone unless you are helping them up'; I go by that in my daily life. It is a good saying methinks.

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  24. Ursula is aptly named. Clearly she is in need of attention she can’t get in her own life.

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    1. Lisa, thanks for making me smile. You sure replied to me in the "spirit" of John's post. With kindness.

      "Attention"? Who is "in need of attention" by addressing me in a way that adds nothing other than stoking animosity?

      As to my name: Yes, it's bear (female); not the big one, Ursa; just the little one, Ursula. Playful. Not that little bears haven't got claws. For comfort think Teddy Roosevelt.

      U

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    2. Can I politely remind you that this is my blog and not yours

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    3. Ursula - methinks you have much else to do elsewhere...

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    4. You misunderstood; I was referring to Ursula from the Little Mermaid

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  25. A long standing regret of mine is that I didn't step in quickly enough one busy Christmas Eve to do the same thing, and the person two ahead of me in the queue walked off without her items. I am so glad that the young mother was faster off the mark than I was.

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  26. Thank you, John. We so need to be reminded right now that there are good people among us and that being one of those good people can be a quiet and simple thing.

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  27. I'm awful for over estimating how much parking time I need and always pass the ticket on if I can. I think it's always very hard to judge. Car parking that needs the VRM is just greedy.
    I think karma works here, what goes around comes around. If you are a good and kind person that will manifest itself to others. Not in any religious way but people will rally round when in need.

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  28. My mum said kindness and politeness cost nothing x

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  29. Anonymous11:47 pm

    When out in public, I always look for opportunities to perform random acts of kindness - holding a door, helping lift packages, even just a kind word or compliment. When thanked, I always thank them in return for allowing me to fill my quota. Rewarding for all involved.

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  30. The smallest gesture can sometimes be monumental.

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  31. I must admit to having done this myself with an elderly lady who seemed unable to find a couple of quid to buy whatever she had. I said the same thing, and was happy to see the queue advancing.

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  32. Lovely. Bless her (Or I would if I could).

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  33. There is so much goodness and kindness in this world. It is easy to forget that.

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  34. Indifference to other people's circumstances is so common that an unexpected act of generosity like that comes as a welcome surprise.

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  35. It’s B&M now....

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  36. I once paid for a young couple's lunch. They were sharing a pizza and a can of coke at a sidewalk café in Spain. I paid for the meal and asked the owner to make sure they had dessert.

    I remember being young, in love, and watching every penny

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  37. Linda P.12:13 am

    I experienced kindness that still touches me, but it wasn't monetary. When the Women's March rolled around, I was still recovering from brain surgery but was so proud that I no longer needed my cane. We were jammed in shoulder to shoulder for hours, waiting to begin, on what was an unseasonably warm day in Austin, Texas. Tempers could have flared but didn't. When we began moving forward, we were still so crowded that we couldn't see curbs. The people in front of us would warn us that they'd just gone over a curb. I began noticing that every time that happened, I would see anonymous hands reach up underneath my elbows, not touching me, but there in case I needed support. I had thought I looked so strong, but other had noticed that I wasn't and were there to help but not to embarrass me, either. It still warms my heart.

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  38. We all need a bit of kindness . . . I loved this . . .

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  39. I'll sound as though I'm blowing my own trumpet here but it's a sweet memory. I had a market stall of my embroidered works including brooches of $10. I watched a little boy wandering up and down for quite some time before he stopped at the brooches and took a long look before he finally chose one and handed me $1. Never in a million years would I have told him there were noughts after that 1. His mother came running back full of apologies and handed me the bag and I just said it was exactly the right price and handed the bag back to him. I hoped she enjoyed her Mothers Day gift.

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