Wednesday, 2 May 2018

Georges Bizet: L'Arlésienne-Suite - Farandole


This piece of music reminds me of Trelawnyd, more than any other I can think of.
Wherever I am in the future, it always will, for in my mind it is the musical accompaniment to a "cinematic" moment ten years ago that lifted the heart more than any other.

We were fairly new to the village then, and in conjunction with an event my sister had planned, I had organised my first allotment open day for charity.
It was a small affair, and certainly wasn't as robust as my later, larger events, but my vegetable beds had been tidied up within inches of their lives, cakes and tea had been prepared and flyers had been circulated around the village with a typical anxiety that centred around the worry that no one would turn up.

I'd arranged for the open evening to start at 6pm, and minutes before time I remember standing by the field gate in a sudden downpour of summer rain.
I know I felt distraught and upset as I couldn't then imagine anyone turning up when the grass was sodden and the skies were slate grey.

When I remember this moment, the Farandole's uplifting violins suddenly enter my psychi. The music echos my feelings at the time as when I walked up the lane to look towards the Church in the hopeful expectation of seeing at least one local turning up to my event , my heart leaped as suddenly I spied a long and steady stream of villagers, led by Auntie Glad (under a massive umbrella), all marching down the lane towards me.
The music now accompanies that cinematic moment in the film clip of my memory.
And I smile gently  as I remember it.

68 comments:

  1. now THAT is a nice memory to take with you.

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    1. It's one of the nicest I possess

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  2. What a sweet memory. One thing I've learned living in England is that people usually don't let rain stop them -- I guess there's so much of it they HAVE to keep going or nothing would ever happen! (And I guess the same is true in Wales!)

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    1. The line of umbrellas paving their way down the lane.......

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  3. A good piece to have pleasant memories attached. In fact the entire suite is just as uplifting.
    Written by a man who was taken from us far too early, at the age of 36 - in the wake of the initial dismal failure of his 'Carmen' which almost certainly contributed to his premature end, he not knowing that his opera would turn out to be (deservedly, in my view) one of the most popular of ALL operas.
    If you don't know it yet I must also recommend his 'Symphony in C', written when he was 17, for heaven's sake! - not at all heavy and brimming with memorable 'tunes'!

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    1. Raymondo. I don't know just why I associate the two but I just do

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    2. 'Fraid I let my enthusiasm for Georgie Boy's music run away with me. Sorry 'bout that. Though it is strange to have these associations remaining with one when the original reason for it has been lost. Just one example - I cannot listen to Elgar without thinking of.......vermicelli!

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  4. thanks - wonderful music for my morning coffee

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    1. It makes you smile and cry at the same time

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  5. What a delightful memory! Village life seems so remote, and far friendlier, from my suburban life in Savannah, GA. xo

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    1. The village has given me a great deal of pleasure

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  6. A lovely memory. Are you SURE you want to leave Trelawnyd, John?

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    1. Adventures new Rosie...adventures new

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  7. Music is a great memory trigger (along with smell and taste.) It is good to hear a nice soundtrack for your life. I hope you have a good day, and an amazing tomorrow.

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  8. Thank you so much for this.

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  9. Anonymous4:43 pm

    This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  10. What a heart warming memory, John...and a lovely uplifting piece of music.

    (and isn't it funny how poison-spouters are always anonymous?).

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  11. My sister-in-law used the word cahoots this afternoon.

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    1. Who was she in cahoots with?

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  12. John, you lifted my spirits with this post. We all seem to worry the same thing, that no one will show up. Even without a wonderful memory sound track like yours, it's truly heart-lifting to remember when they did.

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    1. If you build it they will come

      FIELD OF DREAMS

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  13. That is an inspiring post,for all of us who tend to worry too much.

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    1. Hello Yael.......indeed x

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  14. And now because you have given this to us, it can almost be our memory too. Thank you.

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  15. This is lovely; I pictured the scenery.
    Greetings Maria x

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    1. Greetings Maria...I wish you were there

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  16. Your posts do this. I hope you take allotment day to your new digs.
    Back in the days I was an exhibiting weaver, this sense of lifting happiness came on having my booth perfectly ready for show opening, and stepping out and seeing "the gate" lined up as far as I could see, waiting for show opening. How easy it would be for we exhibitors to smile and make the public feel welcome.

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    1. It's a lovely gratifying feeling joanne x

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  17. Thank you for sharing this tender and wonderful memory with us. It's the people who make a place home, and your friends and neighbors have created a wonderful community. I hope you find and create more wonderful communities wherever life takes you. And so long as you have the internet, you've got a fantastic bloggerhood with lots of nice people who enjoy your company and thank you for being a good host.

    Cheers!



    P.S. I also love Bizet! Magnificent music choice!

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    1. I have several such memories .....my third open day was in fantastic weather. And hundreds turned up......

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    1. This week YP I certainly am

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  19. One of my favourite pieces of music - so glad it also has happy resonance for you too

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  20. I can't bear to think of you leaving Trelawnyd - and I don't even live there!

    I love his music too John.
    You reminded me of an open gardens in our vi

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    1. I hope I can be happy anywhere pat x

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  21. Sorry pressed the wrong button so I will continue.
    ...village just after my first husband died. He was a painter and I opened the house so that folk could view his paintings too. I thought nobody was going to turn up. I had crowds all afternoon.

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    1. We have planned a tea party for the village as a thank you from the flower Show committee this July I hope everyone will turn up

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    2. What time shall we arrive...it is a but if a distance but would love to be there John. Mardy🇨🇦

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  22. Debbie8:18 pm

    What a blessing for you! I love Aunty Glad even more!

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    1. She loved the village and often used to thank me for what I organised.....

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  23. Wow! Can you imagine that scene as the finale of your biopic. Not a dry eye in the cinema.

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    1. It would make a lovely scene in a sentimental movie

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  24. Memories like this are part of the tapestry of your lifes journey ..its truly lovely how music pieces will bring those special occasions back in a flash. Dear Aunty Glad..she led the way on many things didn't she 🌹

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  25. Aunty Glad saved the day! I could always read the affection that shone through your postings when you wrote about Aunty Glad - with good reason it seems.

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    1. It didn't start then....it started the first time I met her , perhaps a year before...I was painting at the cottage soon after we moved in and she was selling flower Show raffle tickets . She asked me to buy some and wished me and chris best wishes for coming to the village. She let me know in a subtle way that she knew Chris was a man and that , it was ok in her world. That he was......I think I fell a bit in love with her that day

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    2. And why wouldn’t you John? The salt of the earth, the like of which we will never see again.

      LXX

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  26. Sometimes angels appear en masse.

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  27. From then on you knew that village life would be fine.

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  28. What a lovely memory! And yes, very cinematic with your soundtrack. The delight that comes from putting yourself out there and getting the positive response you hope for is so rewarding. But that uncertainty that it might all have a happy ending puts so many of the shy & retirings from taking the plunge, whatever the endeavour. Your story is a good reminder that you just have to try things!

    I don't think I've been around long enough to encounter one of your allotment open days - do you not have them now?

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    1. No with possibly moving the field and allotment has been run down

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  29. Ahhh those sweet memories ..
    I love this music, I play it all the time :)

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  30. What a truly wonderful story and memory! You describe it so well.

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  31. brought me to tears . . .
    of happiness . . .
    oh my . . .
    what a jewel . . .
    aunt glad . . .

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  32. Perfect musical accompaniment to a very moving story. Lovely to hear of Aunt Glad again. She'll liven people's memories for many years. Thanks John.

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  33. You are such a 'people person' John....that is a great gift x

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  34. I remember this from the film "It's great to be Young" (John Mills played a music teacher who played the piano in a pub to raise money for school instruments bought on the never never, got found out, got sacked, and the orchestra children barrackaded themselves in the gym in protest. They were supported by children from all the schools in the area). Lovely film.

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  35. Anonymous2:20 pm

    Many years ago, I was talked into hosting an Tupperware party. Invites were sent out, and my best friend was there to help with the set-up. We waited, and waited - no one showed. The phone rang, and it was the Tupperware salesperson - she couldn't make it, her son had broken his arm. So, Joan and I laughed and had the cheesecake all to ourselves. Needless to say, never again!

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  36. What a wonderful memory, and how lovely that Aunt Glad was first in the line of villagers making sure your first event was a success ❤

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  37. I wonder what music will be playing when you & the Prof & animals set off on your new adventure x

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