Tuesday, 1 May 2018

A Thought On The Way Home

I haven't heard the word cahoots for an absolute age! 

33 comments:

  1. Well, who are you in cahoots with

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    1. *Starts sprinking holy water*

      The power of Christ compels you!

      *Puts on poncho in case of pea soup vomit*

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  2. That one was used in our household when I was growing up but no...haven't it heard it in a long time.....thanks for that one.

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  3. Cahoots is so much more descriptive than collusion!

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  4. Cahoots reminds me of classic Hollywood westerns.

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  5. I tend to like using "old-style" words because they feel colorful to me. Curmudgeon is another similar word for me in terms of "color".

    You mentioned potentially jogging on my blog. If you do pursue it, the one especially strong benefit I have found is the ability of jogging to dissipate stress. So, if you often feel anxious or have a great deal of stressors in your day-to-day life, it may help you in a similar way it does for me.

    PipeTobacco

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  6. So many great words we should use more often.

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  7. cahoots - colluding or conspiring together secretly

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  8. It's not uncommon by me.

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  9. Cahoots was replaced by collusion. Confronted with collusion, people became confused.

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  10. It's a word which should best be used in modern politics but is shunned by politicians.

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    1. I was just going to say myself that it's a word nowadays usually confined to politics, but used by someone against another in disparaging fashion, as it has a stronger accusatory tone than 'collusion'.

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    2. Cahoots is a lovely friendly word and nothing siñister about it. My mother was always asking me who was I in cahoots with now. It is a good word. We use it a lot. It is far too friendly and light for politics.

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  11. Hootenanny is a good one too. today the ducks had a right old hootenanny down in their pond!

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  12. Is cahoots used lots in the UK? I am from a UK background and people often look askew at me for my sayings that I thought were normal sayings. Love your blog every day John. Hope you keep it up after the move.

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  13. I use cahoots quite regularly; it seems to be common here. It's one of those words that starts to sound funny if you say it more than once or twice in a row, though :)

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  14. My southern hillbilly of a mother used that word all the time as in "who are you in cahoots with now?!?!" I think I shall toss the word about with my GK's this month. It's never too late to teach the youngsters proper English.

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  15. We are a dying breed unfortunately, us lovers of old, usually, black and white films. Which is where these lovely words are used all the time...

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  16. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  17. Harness bulls, dicks, front office men,
    And the high goats up on the bench,
    Ain't they all in cahoots?
    -- Carl Sandburg

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    1. I'd forgotten that quote. It's time to read Sandburg again. Thanks.

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  18. I haven't heard that in ages either. People in the UK today seem to have a limited vocabulary. I have relatives that have never heard the term skewiff or skew-whiff. Have you John?

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  19. I don't think there's an emoji for it.

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  20. Don't think it is a word I have ever used John so if I ever get to chat with you you will definitely not hear me say it. I don't even know what it means (obviously another example of my sheltered life).

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  21. It is tradional in my family that instead of saying delighted or pleased we say we are ‘ cock-a-hoop !! ‘ Guarenteed to raise a smile xx

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  22. Debbie11:08 am

    I used that word just this week, talking to the dog. She wasn’t impressed.

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  23. Cahoots sounds interesting . . .
    I like old words . . .
    Here is one . . . smitten . . .

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  24. Cheerio my Granny always said that you do not hear it now. Cheerio !!

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  25. I grew up in the South and remember the word but I never hear it used now ... and it is a perfect word .. sounds ridiculous but has meaning lol

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  26. Cahoots is a word used in our house, as is shenanigans - usually referring to something the dogs have been up to.

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  27. Cahoots, shenanigans, traipsing, and my husband's favorite, gallivanting have long had a place in our household! LOL

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  28. I just heard it the other day.

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