Wednesday, 7 March 2018

Average Morning


The Prof was up and out for work at 3.30 am! He will return on Friday night.
I got up around 7.30 and baked a cake for a friend who is having a charity coffee morning.
I dropped off the still warm cake after nine, took Mary to have her claws clipped,
And then had a row with a man in an invalid trolley who beeped me to get out of his way on a single track footpath on the railway bridge in Prestatyn.
He tried to play the disabled card to excuse his  rudeness.
I played the nurse that worked on a spinal injury unit for two decades so knows better card
Like I said a pretty average morning all told.
Off to see I Tonya later.
A treat to myself given The Prof is away


40 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. I might have called it a _____ card but I refuse to say or type his name.

      Delete
    2. _rump card, same difference.

      Delete
    3. Dont you mean Trump! card ha ha

      Delete
  2. Whistle while you work.

    ReplyDelete
  3. "I, Tonya" is a great movie. Figure skating is just the backdrop for a whole meditation on violence of all kinds in women's lives.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I will have to wait till I can stream the movie.
    Enjoy your evening out.

    cheers, parsnip

    ReplyDelete
  5. Wish I could have that audience when I'm rolling out the pastry. Enjoy the film!

    ReplyDelete
  6. I wish I had been there to see that last confrontation. LOL

    ReplyDelete
  7. You make me want to move to a small village like yours where baking a cake and dropping it off still warm is just a part of daily life. I'm wondering if Winnie eyed that cake up whilst you were making it?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. She was unconscious on the couch until 11am

      Delete
  8. John, you are aware that the movie I Tonya, is trying to show that being mean is a bad thing, right? Lol

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I know I am generally light hearted but nothing gets my goat more that someone playing the disabled card inappropriately. Courtesy is a mutual thing disabled or not ,
      Rudeness is not the weakness of the able bodied only.
      .

      Delete
    2. One of the meanest people I ever saw was a little old lady who volunteered with the salvation army. She would scream at people to give up the front bus seat to her even if they had a disability. One day the bus driver had to step in because she was yelling at a blind man.

      Delete
    3. Some of the meanest people I have ever met have been sweet looking old ladies

      Delete
    4. That is so true, John. My first assault as a student nurse was from a little old lady in a wheelchair. She bit me because I didn't know where her cigarettes were!

      Delete
  9. Rude is rude, John. Glad you called him out.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Indeed . If you allow a disabled ( I hate that word) person to be rude just because he / she is disabled , you do an injustice to all

      Delete
  10. Wow and look, you put fancy clothes on to roll that dough. Glad you called him on it, what rude pr...

    ReplyDelete
  11. I'd like to have seen the look on the disabled guy's face when you showed him you were equal to his attempted one-upmanship.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Similarly, I also dislike people who play the age card, by queue hopping in busy shops and confront them when they do this. Never had a run in with a disabled trolley, but if people are rude, they should be pulled up on it.

    ReplyDelete
  13. I've not seen I, Tonya yet, but just back from watching Ladybird this afternoon, it was very good, as was Red Sparrow last night :-)

    I hate people that feel they have the right to 'play their cards' ... let's just be nice and civil to each other.

    ReplyDelete
  14. My mother was a compulsive liar and manipulator who could be extremely selfish and cruel. When she became disabled it was as if no one dared to call her out on her outrageous behaviour. Her children will carry the emotional scars for the rest of their lives. I believe not holding disabled people accountable for their actions and eradicating consequences is worse than infantilizing, good parents, after all, will correct and guide their children.

    ReplyDelete
  15. I love your posts; you are so to-the-point!

    ReplyDelete
  16. No wonder Snowhite was so thin using the rolling pin at that speed. That is as good a way as any to lose weight! (as long as you don't then eat what you have made)

    ReplyDelete
  17. I was walking in town one day when a little boy of about ten punched me in the stomach. He had Downs Syndrome. I looked him in the eye and said 'that was very naughty'. His Gran (or possibly mum) rounded on me viciously telling me that I ought to have some compassion given his obvious disability. At the time I taught 'special needs awareness'. I told her that having a special need did not make it ok to punch a complete stranger. I wonder if she will still think it ok when he is fifteen or twenty five.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ursula8:49 pm

      I agree it's not "ok", Cherie. However, doesn't "special needs awareness" teach how to make allowances for those (say, that boy of your example) who by the very nature of their disability aren't aware of their actions, the impact those actions have on others? It's a fine and difficult line to tread for the "able" to distinguish between intent and incomprehension. For all you know even the word "naughty" might not have meant anything to him. And, as an aside, and not meant as a criticism of you - just something to bear in mind: Parents of such children are on hyper alert as to all the ways of alienating others, the social pitfalls; caught by their own primal instinct of being protective of their young which, in turn sometimes results in first being defensive and then offensive. I wouldn't take it personal. Some, in your case literal, blows we just have to take in our stride.

      U

      Delete
    2. Ursula. I don't agree. I was always given to believe that children with Downs syndrome are very affectionate. That is simply because they have not been taught that it is wrong to rush up and hug/kiss strangers. Everyone makes allowances for this behaviour and that leaves such people open to the dangers of abuse. When I did my teacher training we were told that all children must be treated exactly the same way as you would treat any child. All children learn by example. A lady on the course had a child with Downs Syndrome and she would have been horrified if her child had hugged/kissed or thumped a total stranger. The child had been treated as any other child would have been. Allowances were not made for bad behaviour on the grounds of her disabillty. I learned a lot from that young mum. Unfortunately society disables young disabled people even furher by treating them differently. I realise that this goes against the grain of everything we have been told about compassion but we should enable chldren rather than adding to their disability.

      Delete
    3. I was always taught that patients that were impulsive in their behaviour should always be supervised.
      However if something " happened" I was always to remove the patient then go back to discuss the situation with the stranger involved.

      Delete
  18. The technical term for those vehicles is "mobility scooters" and not "invalid trolleys"! An invalid trolley is a trolley on which disabled people are piled before being moved around hospital environments by porters.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I prefer invalid trolley

      Delete
  19. Tbh I don't think you need a qualification in spinal or special needs to counteract rudeness even in those driving a mobility scooter - though no doubt it helps. We have lots of narrow pavements here in Salisbury (aka nerve gas/Russian spy centre of England) and lots of those vehicles on them. They can be hired very cheaply for use in the city centre. I have stood my ground on almost being swiped off the pavement in front of a bus. I told the driver that I had no intention of stepping off the pavement into the traffic just because he wanted lots of room to dash past me. Though on other days I think maybe I'll hire one myself and cause mayhem among the tourist hordes that plague the city in the summer.(Only joking - perhaps - hahaha.)

    ReplyDelete
  20. I was walking my dogs when suddenly an old man on a mobility scooter going far too fast around a corner & on a pavement nearly drove into us-I was shocked & he just sped off x

    ReplyDelete
  21. Your average mornings do make me laugh. Busy, busy! You were quite luckily not to be run down by the scooter driver. There are a couple around where I live and they can be a real menace careering along pedestrian byways, scattering all in their wake.

    I've commented before, but I'm now wearing a new hat!

    ReplyDelete
  22. You'll have to teach me the "knows better card." I am often stunned by the "driving" of some in their motorized chairs. Racetrack?

    ReplyDelete
  23. Oh my gods! Yes Snow White is your Disney alter-ego - all those animals....

    ReplyDelete
  24. An invalid trolley is a trolley on which disabled people are piled before being moved around hospital environments by porters.


    สมัคร D2BET

    ReplyDelete

I love comments and will now try very hard to reply to all of them
Please dont be abusive x