Thursday, 15 February 2018

Soup That Blows Your Tits Off


I've spent much of the morning clearing the field of rubbish in the freezing cold but sunny weather we've got today. William , Winnie and George mooched around after me whilst Mary was tied up at the gate . I cannot train the hunter in her and set free she will chase Irene and the bachelors until exhausted. The older dogs behave themselves with livestock.
It's amazing what winter crap I collected. Bin bags full of plastic bags, plastic flowers ( blown over the fence from the cemetery) paper and wrappers are the most common but I did find an empty bottle of Malibu and a child's plastic hammer on my travels..
I swept the wood burner flue out when I got back in to warm my hands then I  ate homemade  red pepper and carrot soup laced with chilli for lunch ( which incidentally blew my tits off).
I was going to offer done to old Trevor who lives behind our cottage but I thought the chilli may cause a drastic problem with the digestive tract of a 94 year old.

Anyhow I digress.
Last night the affable Despot Jason and I went to see the much acclaimed play The Weir at Theatre Clwyd . The subject of the piece ( which was set in an isolated Irish pub) was one of rural Irish ghost stories ( the supernatural kind as well as the emotional baggage kind that follow us around for most of our lives) and it sort of dovetailed my recent post on ghost stories quite nicely as we highlighted In our post production discussion in the car on the way home)

The Weir has  four local men jousting at the one room rundown country pub.
Jack ( Sean Murray) and Jim ( John O'Dowd) are lonely single men who drink together for company at Brendan's ( Sam O'Mahoney) bar. They are envious of the more successful Finbar ( Louis Dempsey) who arrives with a young woman called Valerie ( Natalie Radmall- Quirke) who has just come to live in the area.


As the group drink, the men start to share ghost stories in order to impress Valerie, but as their stories become more personal and painful in nature, the cathartic nature of the conversations encourage Valerie  to share a tragic and ghostly story of her own.
The Weir is a dark and at times creepy play which starts to come alive when the ghost stories ( each one progressively more chilling than the last ) start. The supernatural nature of the subject matter highlight the personal backstories of the characters where the themes of grief, loss, loneliness and regret are just as important as the ghostly goings on .

Sean Murray is excellent as the lonely, blustery Jack but for me it was Natalie Radmall Quirke's tear stained final monologue that was a real standout .

Natalie Radmall-Quirke plays Valerie 

41 comments:

  1. Sounds like a pretty amazing production.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Sounds amazing.

    My soup must be quite boring in flavour ... my tits are still firmly attached ;-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. wahahahahah where they should be !

      Delete
  3. We had tomato and red lentil soup today - cold weather food. Sounds like you enjoyed your evening with Despot Jason.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Standard local chicken vermicelli soup here.

      Delete
  4. The play sounds really good. As for having your tits blown off, I hope you have been able to find them again and that Winnie has not wolfed them down. Try sticking them back on with parcel tape.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think you'd like The Weir YP

      Delete
  5. I'd ask for the recipe but, honestly, what teeny bit of tits I have I'd love to keep.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lol dead easy....one leek ( cut and cooked Gently ) add four red peppers chopped, 2 garlic cloves four chopped carrots one red chilli, one small potatoes chopped , season ..simmer one hour !

      Delete
  6. I'm sneaking in this post that I loved yesterday's post and all the interesting comments. I like soup but know nothing about women's chest area.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well I used to date woman and they still baffle me

      Delete
  7. I saw this play in London a few years ago. It lost something in a big London theatre. I thought it needed a small, intimate theatre for the creepiness to work.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes that's what happened
      Last night. It was not the full auditorium just the first ten rows or so

      Delete
  8. I've got 'The Weir' on audio tape, recorded from a Radio 3 broadcast of 20-odd years ago with its original Royal Court cast - and a good, atmospheric play it is too, working remarkably well in sound only.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes I thought at one point that it was originally a radio play as physically little happens

      Delete
    2. Anonymous4:32 pm

      The play you described piqued my interest, and after Googling it, found it on YouTube. It will be 1 hour and 13 minutes out of my day. Now all I need is some soup.

      Delete
    3. let me know if you enjoyed it

      Delete
    4. Anonymous6:16 pm

      I did enjoy it overall. It had an unusual edit as the one of the actors was telling his story; the next thing you know the Woman was telling her story. There was a learning curve with the ascents. Just enough supernatural.

      Delete
    5. You have to train your ear to the broad Irish accent...the northern Irish accent can be a killer too

      Delete
  9. I made an Italian wedding soup and decided to play around by adding some tomato sauce...ended up tasting like spaghetti soup..! The teenager loves it.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Soup that warms going in and going out.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Very funny....
      I always remember a doctor telling a print to each tinned peaches when she felt sick during pregnancy
      " they taste as nice comming up as they did going down" he said

      Delete
  11. You make very nice soup-I like spicy food.I cook with chillies & ginger most days.I think I would be fine as I only have fried eggs x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No a lover of ginger but I use the warmth of paprika a great deal

      Delete
  12. Your soup sounds lovely; just the way I like it too.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Soup sounds horrifying to me.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm farting like a trooper now

      Delete
    2. Oh dear,it may be one of the dogs x

      Delete
  14. Are they tiles under your nice soup? If so where did they come from please.

    ReplyDelete
  15. No it's a plastic tablecloth ! From John Lewis I think.

    ReplyDelete
  16. new post on hippo's blog!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. its a poem it could be him because of the content but not sure as it could be someone else. We will wait to see if he replies to comments!

      Delete
    2. I don't believe it is him.....it's painful to see this.. but thanks sol

      Delete
    3. Sol, thanks for bringing this to our collective attention. It sure is exciting news.

      John, I left you a reply to your first comment on the thread in question. May it soothe your furrowed brow.

      U

      Delete
  17. Soup is the way forward, schools should teach kids how to make something out of very little. Forget ready meals, a few odds and ends of vegetables make a nourishing meal.

    LX

    ReplyDelete
  18. Soup is art. Chuck in whatever you like and it may turn into a masterpiece. (Or may not.)

    ReplyDelete
  19. I had homemade soup tonight, no doubt inspired by you John.
    I used chicken pulled off a roast chicken that had to be eaten or tossed .. and turkey broth and instead of dumplings I bought little cheese tortellinis at the market and tossed some of those in ..
    It hit the spot :)

    ReplyDelete
  20. Ah, another award-winning title. I look forward to the title of the next post about the morning ablutions.

    ReplyDelete
  21. Thank you for this your broadcast provided bright clear concept.

    หนังออนไลน์

    ReplyDelete

I love comments and will now try very hard to reply to all of them
Please dont be abusive x