Wednesday, 9 April 2014

Plodding

Last home as always

Last week, at work, I found myself supporting a junior manager. She was having a moan about a bad shift she had experienced, where a few colleagues didn't quite pull their weight as part of the team. 
I took the opportunity to share my thoughts about " the plodders" of a team, every group has them..... Never the high flyers,  never the ambitious ones, but often supportive in their own pedestrian kind of way.
Plodders , I always think, can form the backbone upon which a team can support itself.
I think she got my gist.
The plodder in our house is George.
Physically slower than his fellow pack members , he is always last through the door, last home after a walk and last up from bed in a morning, but it's his character that so amuses and exasperates me during everyday life, for George is a chronic procrastinator. 
In George's world, every blade of grass needs a sniff and every new view needs to be looked at and looked at again. There is no urgency in George World...and why would there be? , he learnt long ago that whatever he does, she could never compete with any other dog.
Being small and stocky means that the bigger, more assertive and faster dogs beat him to the bone every time.
What's the point in rushing?
George is best served in his own little world

It's a world of plodding.



42 comments:

  1. I've mentioned before that we had a dear Scottie called Magnus for fourteen years and we loved him every day of his life. He wasn't so much a plodder as that he had Attitude that everything he ever wanted or needed came his way, no matter what. I just LOVE your George and relive our Magnus' life when you post about him. You go George (at your own pace!) xx

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  2. Isn't George a happy soul!
    It's our Abby who is the plodder here. Lily, our goldendoodle, is lithe and quick...she's always in the lead. Buddha, our Boston terrier rescue, is always quick off the mark, despite having a bad leg (from prior abuse). Abby is a petite but stocky pit bull rescue...she's so muscle-bound that she practically waddles!
    Despite being slower than the others, she's a cheery and loving girl who distributes kisses and 'pittie' smiles with a generous, erm, hand; particularly if she gets to wear her favourite pink dress!

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  3. Self acceptance is a good thing.

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  4. You have a wonderful outlook on the plodders of the world. Good for you - and good for George.

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  5. Not a bad place to be John - plodding but reliable - better than being a fly by night.

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  6. I am small and stocky, too. I think I should show this post to my family, who have always pushed me to be a high flyer. I'm glad there's at least one person out there who can appreciate us plodders.

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  7. As he knows he can't beat the others I wonder if his tardiness is a 'put-on' as being what he thinks is one way to get your attention. If so it seems to be working.

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  8. The world needs plodders to survive. If everyone wanted to be first through the door there'd be quite a crush.

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  9. I have been trying to catch up all my life. I was always the youngest in the school year, b.d. 28th August. At work I was always happiest working in the background.......a plodder like George, good for him.

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  10. Plodders unite, can't all be mercurial, thank heaven for lovely George.

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  11. What a sweet post. I love how each of your pets have their own place, and you love them all each in their own way. :)

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  12. This is yet another thing we humans can learn from animals. Instead of striving for things they don't have, animals try to make do with what they have.

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  13. I need Georges to slow me down and look at all the grass blades. Perhaps I should put a small cast iron replica in my pocket for a reminder.

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  14. What a lovely post and so close to my heart.
    My Watson is a plodder especially more so with his 15 years.
    But he sure gets happy and spunky when the leads come out for a walk.
    He sniffs every new plant and flower. He takes his time and enjoys every second of his walk. I love when he comes back from a walk (son takes them) and he still has flower or a leaf in his hair.

    cheers, parsnip

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  15. We need plodders - can't all be high flyers !

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  16. George has the right idea....stop and smell the roses!

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  17. That's my kind of dog - relaxed. Changing the subject somewhat, I do like that bridge that George obviously spent more time admiring than the rest of the pack. What is it?

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    1. The track you see is in fact the track of the old railway line between dyserth and the coast
      It was generally used for limestone transport but there was a small passenger service.
      There is a lane that runs over it
      Off to work now!

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  18. I am the only plodder in this house. The four legged beasties move faster than quick silver - unless they are asleep. And how I would love to be able to sleep as well and relax as well as a cat or a dog.

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  19. George is a sweetie :)

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  20. I can neither fit myself nor any of my cats into this plodder description but I enjoyed it nonetheless.

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  21. What a good view of all plodders. Thank you.

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  22. I have one plodder. She's a kidder too. If I try to hurry her she manages to project an air of urgency - with every fibre of her being she looks like she's rushing - while her legs are actually just moving her along at their usual rate. She's just humouring me....

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  23. Good post... and you know that I simply love George - he can come to live with me, anytime.

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  24. I think George has a positive outlook on life & lives life at a pace that allows him to take in all the sights & smells that bring happiness into his little life. The other dogs may have their sights set on the finish line & they may be faster and more efficient at reaching their goal, but they miss out on many of the smaller details along the way. It is George, the plodder that he is, who takes the greatest pleasure from his surroundings while strolling through life at a slower pace. It is the plodders that, by contrast, that make those who are leaders shine.
    I heard on the news today that a gene responsible for procrastinating has been discovered, Thanks goodness those of us who have the trait can blame this annoying trait on genetics.

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  25. Bless him, I think George sounds perfect.

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  26. The 'Georges' of the world are enjoying the scenery along the way through life. Smart fella he is!

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  27. Witness the glacier and the torrent, they both get where they are going.

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  28. A fellow after me own heart! Love him.

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  29. He's my kind of dog.

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  30. George is a smart dog. If only more of us could be so smart about such things.

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  31. He also sounds like the one who'd receive the most affection.

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  32. Blessed are the plodders: for they take the time to enjoy this earth

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  33. I wonder how many disused branch lines there are in Britain and Ireland, John?

    A manager who I worked for once said to me to always walk behind people and make them wait for you instead of you waiting for them.

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  34. Ah George you are the sweetie...I'm a plodder too and wouldn't have it any other way...the jobs get done without the stress...John you have a great perspective on people and life...

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  35. Another profound Going Gently Lesson for Living... Thanks go to you... and to George.

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  36. George is a contented dog, and why wouldn't he be? You love him no matter what. :)

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  37. Plod mode is what works when all else fails.

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