Saturday, 26 April 2014

Invisibility

Just off to bed as I am working tonight
Have a look at this video
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29 comments:

  1. Most of my relatives would walk past me even if they recognised me, and sometimes do.

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  2. I'd heard about this on the news. Sadly the truth is we don't see anyone on the street because we're rushing along trying to get from point A to point B, hoping nobody gets in our way and slows us down.

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  3. Homelessness is so common now, like cracks in the sidewalk, we do not want to acknowledge them. More's the pity.

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  4. People prefer not to see the human debris of the failed system they helped create.
    Jane x

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    1. You're right, Jane. And we all want to think it can't happen to us. So we tell ourselves that somehow those people are inferior, and we seldom question who they are or how they got there.

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  5. I have brought people food, blankets, "hobo bags" (misc, toiletry supplies) and lists of places that might be able to help them. I have to admit though that I have children so I would not be willing to bring these people home with me. Making them feel a little more comfortable isn't going to fix their problems, but at least a smile and a small gift can remind them that they're still human and that people do care.

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  6. I think we tend to look away because if we really see them then we have to acknowledge that this could so easily be ourselves.

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  7. I worked with the homeless, ran a shelter - it's a complex problem.

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  8. It's so sad. We live right near an old Mental hospital which was sold to developers. I often wonder where all the residents went but we were fobbed off with the "care in the community is better for them" and no one mentions them now.

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  9. Always worth it to have one's conscience poked once in a while.

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  10. I have personal experience of homelessness and it's a frightening situation to be in. My priority all my adult life has been to secure a roof over our heads, even if we have to do without lots of things to do so. We take having a home for granted; we are safe, dry and warm in our home and it could so easily be lost due to various reasons and through no fault of our own. Often homeless people are looked down on and I can't imagine anyone choosing to be homeless. It's a terrible experience. Well done John for highlighting this issue x

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  11. Stephenson took my answer. My mother used to cross the road when she saw me coming.

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  12. that was below the belt you go snuggleing into bed and leave me crying

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  13. It is a massive problem, with no band-aid answers.
    When I lived in Laguna Beach every winter our town would double the amount of homeless.
    My church along with the four other churches opened our doors for food and a place to sleep especially in winter. The police would send them to shelter but day after day night after nigh most wanted to be outside in doorway. There is only so much one can do before you just burn out. I did. I used to buy gift card for food at fast food restaurants and hand them out when asked for money but I am not sure that even helps. So now it is donations to food banks and shelters for families. I feel at lest they are looking for help.
    As I said I've burned out.
    I agree with Carol said it is a complex problem.
    Help can only help if someone wants it and governments realize there is a problem.

    cheers, parsnip

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  14. Puts a tear on the cheek and a lump in the throat....it could happen to any of us.

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  15. I agree with everything being said, and I think it's a great point that's being made, but...but,I think they stacked the deck here. When someone's wearing a wide-brimmed hat, sitting on the ground and holding a paper in front of her face, how could anyone see that person?

    Of course, I have no doubt I'd have walked on by...even in the grocery store, I never notice friends and neighbors next to me until they walk up to me to say "hi." It's damn near impossible to stay sane in a big city without shutting out thousands of faces every day.

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    1. I agree with Alison. Also it is rude to stare at people especially those less fortunate so I am conscious of not staring and inviting hostility. So many of these unfortunate people suffer from mental illnesses of one kind or another.
      Very thought provoking.

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  16. Such a thin line between 'us' and 'them'.

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  17. I think the homeless are invisible to many people these days. They're such a routine feature on the streets. Jenny and I were shocked in San Francisco last year at the huge number of transients and disturbed individuals in the streets, all being ignored by passers-by. We wondered why nobody seemed to care about them or do anything for them. Re the video, I guess it would be quite easy to walk past your own relative if they were wearing scruffy clothes and huddled in a doorway because you simply wouldn't expect to see them like that.

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  18. very powerful! this is why i try to give them extra attention!

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  19. A safety and coping strategy in a big city is to not engage. Some homeless are pleasant, some are in need of serious mental health treatment. People don't look, because they don't want to engage.

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  20. Well, that left me speechless and wondering: am I that blind? am I that self-absorbed?

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  21. Powerful.

    Have you seen this John ?
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eBuC_0-d-9Y

    I don't know what to say - all said above.

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  22. I don't want to sound heartless, John, but these folks were pretty convincingly costumed and most had their heads down. I wouldn't have recognized my wife of 44 years under those conditions, either. The issue of homelessness is very complex and I'm not going to solve it by either acknowledging or ignoring a homeless person on the street.

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    1. Good point Scott... I thought the same.. But then the emotion took me over

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  23. WOW!!

    This has really made me think.

    I know I walked past a guy outside M&S in Llandudno, he sits there with his dog most days, and the reality that I had just had a coffee inside and he was sat on the ground with nothing but a blanket and his dog made me go back say Hi and give him £2. He had been ignored for so long he jumped out of his skin, but gave me his thanks and the nicest smile. I know it probably went on drink or drugs but I made him smile .... and that made my day.

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    1. Sue: When I was on vacation in Albuquerque, New Mexico (USA), I noticed a homeless man across the street from my B&B bedding down for the night under a business entrance canopy--and he had a dog with him. I have to admit that I felt really, really sorry for the dog (though the dog did have a companion, and probably a companion who loved it). I was tempted to go over to the fellow and give him some money, even if he could use it to buy some dog food, but in the end I didn't do anything.

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