Wednesday, 21 November 2012

The Stamping Of Little Feet, Drama Queens in Trelawnyd and in Hospital

Sylvia's feet and a more sedate Irene
Since the sheep arrived I have tried to keep the dogs away from the field. 
I am no expert, but I always thought that terriers and ewes would not and could not mix.
I was right!
But not in the way that I originally thought.
Yesterday I took all three dogs onto the field,William and Meg I tied to the gate ( both have a tendency to "over sniff" the tame warrens so have to be tethered) and George I let free to roam by himself.
we had been there not a minute before both ewes crossed the field to see what all the fuss was about.
The Welsh terriers, typically of the breed, sat stiffly and in silence to watch the sheep v-e-r-y carefully as they approached.
George, oblivious to anything, wandered off by himself and entered the nearest hen house in his usual and futile attempt to steal eggs.
With Sylvia in the lead both ewes walked directly within  eight feet or so of the dogs, facing them off. With short little stabbing motions they stamped the ground with their hooves, edging forward together with their heads held high in a serious example of " Drama girl power" and within a mere 20 seconds of this "show of strength" the terriers were suddenly backing up to the gate pleading with me with worried faces, to intervene.
It was as simple and as forceful as that.
Of course if their introduction was made with the dogs loose in the field, then the resulting chase and panic would have been very different indeed. But organising this first meeting in a controlled way allowed the Welsh terriers ( who like most dogs are cowards at heart) to see who was top honcho.
And the big enchiladas are now Sylvia and Irene

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Speaking of Drama Queens, My sister is recovering quite nicely from her painful knee replacement. I have just spoken to her ( she was having a cup of tea with a doilley on the saucer when I was put through to her room! )  and She told me that when she was in the anaesthetic room before the op, she met with the surgeon, who engaged her in some light banter mainly because he knew she was a bit of a nervous patient.
Just before he "put her under" my sister, with a somewhat serious flourish stated soberly
"I am placing my knee... and my life .....in your hands!"
What the hell do you say to THAT one?
Sigh
It's nice to know that I am not the only drama queen of the family!


27 comments:

  1. Still on for tonight? 6:55pm? :)

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    1. and before anyone thinks that "I am on the turn"
      Hannah ic coming to your Flower Show Meeting!!!!
      yes Hannah, will me you around 6.55 as planned!!!

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  2. We had a Border Collie corner a ram in Snowdonia once. She would have made a great sheep dog if trained.

    I did ask to be brought back to life again once when I was put under for an op.... but was a jibbering teerful wreck when Joe had an op aged three. Hope your sister is Ok.

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  3. She had a GA instead of an epidural?

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    1. sp.
      she had both cos the surgeon said he couldn't chat with her constantly through 2 hours of surgery

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  4. I do hope the operating table was neatly spread with doilies.

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  5. I wish more people thought through how to 'introduce' animals to each other. Just last week my daughter encountered a 'dog-lover' who believed in letting her animal run free. Being a very insecure dog meeting Daisy, my grandpuppy, who doesn't even think she's a dog (but was on a leash) a confrontation ensued and Jessica ended up with a bite right through her thumbnail bed as she wrestled the two dogs apart. Some people are so irresponsible.

    Glad Sis is doing well.

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  6. Does going private mean you get a dishy male nurse to mop your fevered brow?
    Jane x

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  7. I bet she got charged for that doiley!!!

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  8. So glad your sister is on the mend. I'm sure it is a huge relief to have the surgery behind her...

    Hol-la to those badasses Sylvia and Irene!

    John? Did you see the Walking Dead Christmas cards? Over here, they are even selling Christmas tree ornaments. Slay me.

    Kelly in Cali







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    1. hummmm
      the walking dead christmas cards?
      not quite "good will to all zombies eh?"

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  9. Smart move to tie the dogs up. That'll 'larn' them not to nose around the sheep.

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  10. Glad she's OK. She's milking it isn't she. xxxx

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  11. Got to love those crazy Terriers.

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  12. Pretty typical sheep behavior, but wait until they are with lambs!!! I wouldn't recommend even letting them in the field at that point, they become VERY aggressive to perceived threats when there are lambs involved. I've seen some of my more motherly girls stamp at dogs that are a quarter mile away. lol

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  13. Glad to see Sylvia and Irene getting more confident..

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  14. It was the case of The Sheepstamp Redemption!...in relation to Sylvia and Irene - not your sister of course. Was it housemaid's knee caused by too much front doorstep scrubbing?

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  15. Sylvia and Irene are perfect at their job. I remember my uncle's collie with his sheep. Of course, their job was to be herded and Sylvia and Irene's to be the tallest animals in the allotment. Excepting you, of course.

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    1. In the Earl's defence, may I say he is not an animal, he's a human bean!

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  16. Ahh -- that is the trick to introducing farm animals to dogs. Certainly worked for you. I'll file it in my bag of tricks just in case some farmer I meet along the way needs some help. Enjoyed and hope your sister is doing well -- barbara

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  17. Your sister's remark to the surgeon sounds like an excellent way of reminding him that he's dealing with a rather nervous flesh-and-blood patient and not just another surgical "case" to be sliced and chopped.

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  18. John: It's getting colder here on the eastern American seaboard, so we've got to think about our four goats this winter. (Major concern: keeping their drinking water from freezing.) A friend and neighbor with an empty barn has offered the goats winter quarters, but he has two poodles--a standard and a robust toy. I doubt that there will be problems, but neither of us is completely sure about that. I'll keep you posted.

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  19. Best wishes to your sister. I bet that line is going to be a sure topic of conversation at the surgeon's Christmas bash or whatever they have

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  20. When I had foot surgery privately, local anaesthetic was administered in a treatment room then I had to hop down the corridor, literally, to the operating theatre, where loud music was being played, presumably to drown out the sound of the hammering and sawing. They were playing "Dancing Queen" by Abba. The surgeon and what seemed like dozens of theatre staff (probably only three) all had straight faces but avoided eye contact.

    When I went to have the other foot done one year later, the same thing happened. I'm not sure whether it improves one's confidence in the surgeon or not to know he has a sense of humour.

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  21. I learn a lot from you, John. Real glad to hear your sister is doing well, too.
    Take care. ♥

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  22. Sounds like all's well for all the drama queens.

    Glad to hear your sister came through the surgery well--i hope she can have as quick and painless a recovery as possible.

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