Tuesday, 17 April 2012

...a face, only a mother could love.....

Another day
another abandoned animal.
Last night, when I was locking up, I came across this little character hiding away in the goose house. I suspected, quite rightly that he had just had the shit kicked out of him by the resident cockerels as both Stanley and Eric had been "performing" with extra gusto at dusk.

Not nine inches high himself and just skin and bone, the tiny bantam looked as though he was on his last legs, but after some dabbing with witch hazel and a bit of a cuddle, he seemed to perk up enough to eat a few mouthfuls of cat food and half a gallon of water.

It's a throwaway world is it not?
We discard tons of rubbish a year without a second thought, and the people who didn't want this little scrap of poultry anymore threw him away with the same scant disregard, for anyone that understands birds would know that he would stand no chance against the field's two, metre-high cockerels and the bantam, Eric, who has more chutzpah than Maureen Lipman.
But as luck would have it, he survived the day,
and of course he will survive the next.....
I will start the process of finding him a home tomorrow....
.....Manyana

46 comments:

  1. "as luck would have it, he survived the day"
    No. As luck would have it, they chose *your* field to dump him in.
    That'll do John, that'll do.......

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  2. Poor little cahp!

    I did think it might be good to get one of those trail cams to catch the throw-away felons in the act so you could post a pic of them dumping on you field and shame them, but on reflection I dread to think what would happen to unwanted birds in the future if you didn't take them in.

    Do you need some thrush cream? (for the bird hehe)

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  3. canesten already applied !fanar fanar

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  4. Poor little fella. Thank you for your sweet comment - I never mind "helping out" so long as I get a cuppa & don't have to organise !

    Here is a nice story. One of the village pub's garden rolls down to the stream which runs through the village. There are a pair of Mallards & were four beautiful brown ducks at this part of the stream.

    A while back four stunning white ducks appeared & I was worried about them as they'd waddle into the road. After some investigation I found that they actually belonged to the pub ( & have a little house on the bank )

    One white duck has vanished and sadly three of the brown ones too. The four remaining ducks have got together & are inseparable - brown & white - wonderful to watch waddling around, swimming, feeding & preening together.

    The Mallard couple remain aloof !

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  5. wat ist wong wth thiz fycling ketboad

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  6. did you mention two metre high cockerels?!?!?!? Runs for the hills....

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  7. two....metre high cocks artic!

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  8. Without meaning to sound cruel, I would leave a polite notice on the gate...

    "Any animals left here without my agreement will be humanely dispatched..."

    And, to twist the knife, you might also add...

    "No matter how much of an animal lover you believe yourself to be"

    Leaving animals for someone to care for and resource is selfish, and it's costing you a fortune....

    Nx

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  9. God bless you for being so caring to a little waif and stray.

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  10. funnily enough nige, I have just drafted something similar
    which I am going to put up on the village noticeboards...
    I will take your advice and laminate a copy to put on the gate!

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  11. I am so glad that he found someone to care. I cannot say (without using very bad words indeed) what I think of those who dump animals.

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  12. as Wanda says, the person who dumped him with you, knew you would nurture him and you did not let the little bloke down.

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  13. He's a he? My first thought on seeing that pic was Molly Parkin.

    The dumpers must have a smidge of humanity about them if they took the trouble to put him on your land.

    'two metre high cockerels'. lol!

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  14. It is a disposable society John. I have seen that many times working with the rescue--It's also becoming a society, at least here in the US where people want the best, they want the end results and the reward without having to work for it--Animals are included with that.

    While it may have been a bad day yesterday for the cockerel, his best days are yet to come because of you ...

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  15. He was lucky that he was dumped on you. Its a sad day when our throw away society starts throwing away living creatures.

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  16. It's the way of the world, sadly. I think the constant barrage of "self sufficiency" TV drivel pushes people down the route without highjlighting that it's hard work and time consuming!

    Bloody Hugh Fairly Witless and his cohorts; they've also pushed up the price of belly pork!

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  17. ...what is wrong with people John?

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  18. Poor little soul! He's lucky to have landed with you.

    My Beaker's comb is looking like that right now -- obviously somebody had a go at him. I put some bag balm on it but I think I will try the witch hazel.

    Poor little banty man... hope he lands in clover in a happy new home.

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  19. Good thing he was "dropped" around to your place; most people would leave them to die at their own place I am sure. You are the "labelled" save all bird guy for sure, John !

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  20. A face only a mother could love. Quite. Clearly the previous owners didn't.

    I'll be putting out word for a bulldog pup to replace Dinge, the uglier the better!

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  21. Beat up maybe, but so wise looking! He been around the block and back.

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  22. I think he's cute...got a 1950s quiff bad boy vibe going on.
    Jane x

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  23. Is that crest natural, or the result of conflict? Looks a bit Carmen Miranda-ish.

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  24. He does look a bit roughed up doesn't he?

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  25. Surely he has found his new home John?

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  26. Thank goodness he landed with you, the poor little lad. Bless you for caring. Jo

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  27. Sadly, it happens a lot.
    That's why so many stray animals.
    Here in places, feral dog packs are as dangerous or more so, than wolves.
    Hope you can find him a good home, John.

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  28. His worst day turned into his best chance.
    People are taking advantage of your kind nature which is not fair.

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  29. To your notice I think I might add "and it's former owner less than humanely dispatched. This is a small village, I WILL find out who you are"
    You are a good man John Grey
    xoxox

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  30. My goodness! He is lucky to have survived. He lookes as if he has an Elvis-do gone wrong.

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  31. Poor little chap - good on ya!

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  32. I thought I was seeing Predator at first. Course I'd like to set Predator on whoever left the poor guy. Good luck with the sign!

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  33. He's a lucky bird landing with you . I too was watching Gaz on Interceptors at the same time! And the ceiling thing! Great minds! xxxxx

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  34. It IS a disposable society. EVERYTHING is worth nothing, to some people. Certainly not a chicken. Not even human life. It makes me ill. But it's also one of the reasons I'm convinced I'm here, and people like you are here. To make a difference. To acknowledge that life IS sacred, even that of a beat up little bantam roo. Thanks for being one of THOSE people, instead of one of those OTHER people.It matters. You matter.

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  35. I'd like to think there's a special place in hell for people who abuse or dump animals.

    So, are you keeping Manyana, John, or are you going to need to find him another place to live?

    Bless you for helping his hapless fellow.

    megan

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  36. Mother's and YOU, JOHN! :)

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  37. you are chuffin' lovely xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

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  38. There must be some blind people who like to look after poultry.

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  39. It's a sad world. Glad he found his way to you.

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  40. Poor little chap. Good job you were around John, but can't help agreeing with Nigel's comment.

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  41. He has a loving home now! poor little guy.

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  42. Oh, John, we all know you have a puddin' heart. I think he's kinda cute.

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  43. Hello John, I'm in the city with my hens, so no one drives by to dump their chickens--maybe cats and dogs, but not chickens.

    Thank you for joining my blog. I signed up for yours as well, certain that it will inspire and delight me on a regular basis.

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  44. A lot of people would be happy to keep their little cockerels if their neighbors didn't bitch about it. Too many people think they "deserve" a pristine life, absent a neighbor's lively animals or children, and certainly without dirt or any of those other annoying things. Where I live, in a rural area, we laugh at those people. In town they are not only tolerated, but if there's one picky butthead on the block, everyone else has to do things their way. That may not be the case with your new little rooster, but I see a lot of that around here. People will buy 4 chicks at the feed store and one might turn out to be a male. It's a real problem for them to find a good solution to that situation.

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  45. John, you are becoming a veritable Brigitte Bardot alike.

    I'd take some of your finds off you. But having moved to the city I can't. Which reminds me: If you havent't yet please do watch "Ace Ventura - Pet Detective." It's so stupidly funny I don't know how many times my son has made me watch it.

    Bear hug to you John Robin Brood, the saviour of feathers, Mabel, Albert and Chris.

    Hope the planting went well.

    U

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