Sunday, 26 May 2019

Laburnam


I fell asleep in a tangle of dogs on the couch last night and only went to bed around 4 am when the fire died completely and the room became still and chilled.
I woke around 9am after a total of ten hours sleep.
I felt sort of refreshed but behind my eyes remained a vague post infection ache that reminds you its there when you turn your head quickly.
I went out in my pyjama clothes to the graveyard to see the laburnum which is almost in full flower, but what I really wanted was to feel the rain without a coat on
Cool rain chases away the aches.
and reminds you
that you are alive.

46 comments:

  1. The picture is very beautiful, the tree, the churchyard, you live, and if I was really close I would make you chicken soup that would make everything good,like we make here to get things better.

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  2. My grandmother he'd a Laburnum in her back garden in Kent. I remember loving it even as a small child. Don't know if they grow here. Do hope you are feeling one hundred percent very soon.

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  3. They are beautiful when in full flower. Like liquid gold. Hope you feel better?

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  4. Be careful and don't go getting a chill. x

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  5. Laburnam is like a yellow version of wisteria - beautiful.

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  6. I agree..rain on your skin is a marvellous feeling...but take care of yourself...see you soon maybe x

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  7. That's a beautiful tree - lovely with the church in the background. Hope you keep feeling better throughout the day! -Jenn

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  8. It sounds like you're doing much better physically. What a relief. I love the tree and agree with you about a cool spring rain.

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  9. That’s a super pretty photo! The tree looks fantastic. You have the cutest views. I like it when you write about where you live. It’s so different to my suburban experience!
    Glad to read you’re feeling better. And yes, feeling the rain is an amazing experience it reminds me of when I was a child and when to play out when it was raining. So freeing.
    XoXo

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  10. I love Laburnam so about ten years ago I bought one. I don't have a large garden so I bought a small weeping version. Big Mistake! For a long time I thought it wasn't flowering,then had a close up look and found all the flowers were growing inside hiding under the foliage. Get well soon John.

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  11. One of my fondest childhood memories is running around in the pouring rain in our underwear, it was FANTASTIC! Glad you're on the mend.

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  12. Thank you for that picture. I don't know how many times I've seen laburnums mentioned in English stories I've read, but this is the first picture I've seen of an entire tree in flower. Now I see why they're everywhere - at least in literature. Gorgeous!

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  13. If you liked that kind of early morning stroll, you'd love it here: it's 3C and light rain, snowing in the mountains around us.

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  14. Beautiful Laburnum!
    Whatever works for you, John! Happy you are feeling better!

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  15. The rain on your skin can remind you that you are alive and sights like that Laburnam can even make you glad that you are.

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  16. I have that same damn post-infection ache behind my eyes. I've taken aspirin each morning for the past three days. Maybe you and I had the same thing?!

    I always wondered what a laburnum was! I'm sure I've seen those around.

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  17. Nice ... I'm going outside next time it rains.

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  18. When the seasons finally change and rain feels good again, happy days!

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  19. Barbara Anne3:25 pm

    What a lovely laburnum tree! Those trees grow here in Virginia, too, and there is a Laburnum Rd. in downtown Richmond. Ta for the picture.

    Hope to don't take a chill from being in wet pajamas. :)

    Wishing you WELL!

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  20. You are alive I hope you feel better x love to you and the furries x

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  21. I have always enjoyed rain - the practical side of it (nature loves rain, most of the time). I have always used rainwater. 33 years ago it was unusually warm spring and we (at boarding school) took shower under rain gutter. Yep, it was lovely, and very radiating. We didn't know it then, but there was accident in Chernobyl and that specific warm rain had huge amounts of radiation.
    Lovely laburnum - I remember it was used as a poison in a tv-serie, it must've been ancient (in the 80's or early 90's).

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  22. "Mam! Mam! There's a bloke running around in the churchyard in his pyjamas and it's raining! He's sniffing that yellow tree now!"
    "Tsk! Tsk! No matter Myfanwy. It'll just be The Dogman. He lived in England you know!"

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  23. About thirty years ago I knew a lovely couple. They had farmed in Africa and their hearts were really there. One day the lady was telling me a story . . . it had been the dry season and it had gone one and on. One day it started to rain, the raindrops jumped two feet into the air. She stripped off and went out with her two children and they danced and ran around in the rain until they had had enough. Her husband only said one word "Pagan" but I knew what had made her do it. Do not get cold. Love Andie xxx

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  24. Rain on the face is so soothing as is walking in churchyards.

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  25. Yes, it does. What a joyful little adventure.

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  26. Rest and rain, enjoy the day

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  27. I had a long walk in the rain today. It was very cathartic. I know I keep saying it but I truly do hope that you feel better soon in every way. x

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  28. I hope you feel better soon. xx

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  29. I often go out in the rain especially after the very hot summer lead up to the monsoons. The first rain is always the best.
    Feel better soon.
    parsnip x

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  30. I used yo climb a laburnam tree and hide in it when I was a kid. Now, my stupid spell-checker does not know how it is spelled. I didn't know how poisonous laburnams were then either.

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  31. I hope you feel completely better in short order, John. From experience, I can tell you that regular sufficient sleep (or rest if you can't sleep) can do wonders for your health, and the opposite is true if one tries to burn the candle at both ends. The body needs time to mend on a daily basis. xx

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  32. What a lovely picture! Rain can be refreshing as long as you don't get chilled. I do hope you are feeling better- I've been worried about you.

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  33. Random Laburnums are in flower here (so beautiful). There are some up on the Mynydd which are part of fence lines - I know they are poisonous to livestock so wondered how they got there. Someone once told me that during WW1 all the timber normally used for fencing was going out to hold up the trenches and so farmers had to use what was available and apparently they were given "fence poles" which turned out to be Laburnum and which rooted themselves and grew. Don't know how much truth there is in this but it's an interesting tale.

    Get well soon.

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  34. There is more rain forecast for us tomorrow so I recommend a full day of liberating nudity wherever you wander. Perhaps you could forward your schedule? X

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  35. And I am glad that you are alive.

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  36. That scene is perfect heart balm, made better with gentle (I assume) rain.
    Hope you continue to feel better.

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  37. Wet pyjamas are also likely to give you a chill.

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  38. It's 97degrees in Jacksonville Florida and fires are a worry.
    Send your Rain to us!

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  39. Golden chain, indeed. I did that very thing today, not to see the laburnum, but to be wet in the morning rain.

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  40. This was the best goshdarn blog entry I have read all month.

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  41. During the night, I often take the dog outdoors with me for a pee. You're right, if it's raining it's surprisingly refreshing; and blow the wet.

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    Replies
    1. Anonymous3:38 am

      Ahhh. You remind me of my husband - he was born and raised in the mountains. We live in a city now, but we are fortunate to have a large yard so he still pees outside. Kids grown and gone, but he won't give up this big old house because then he couldn't pee outside. It's that important and part of his soul. Bless you Cro Manon.

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  42. Yes you have nailed it with your beautiful words yet again.Trees and rain, always a balm for the soul.

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  43. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  44. You have written a beautiful haibun.Prose ending with a haiku. I think you would enjoy writing poetry and you could possibly be a gifted poet. Give it a shot. They are many poetry sites on the net.

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