Friday, 8 November 2013

Mary


At the age of 51, there are things that you expect not to happen in your life.
You don't expect to get spots,
You don't get the urge to throw yourself head first on a bouncy castle
And you don't expect to be owning your first rabbit.
Mary, the disabled rabbit seems to be going from strength to strength.
Admittedly her life is a small one
A dry hay bed
A nice selection of bunny food
And a view of a field, a lane and the excitement of passing traffic.
It is a small life.
I have been thinking about the ethics of looking after a wild creature in such conditions. Her leg remains fairly useless, and so her survival chances within the Darwinian world of the hedgerows would be brief...
It's a knotty question
What would joy Adamson do I wonder?
I got home late last night after Samaritans and took William out for a quick pee break
We looked over the field gate and saw Mary, sitting up in her  hutch, eager and alert and safe.
 She looked happy enough..that is if rabbits can actually look happy.....and as we watched her nibble
Contentedly on some donated greenery...I thought to myself...even Joy Adamson wouldn't dare to whistle " BORN FREE" in my general direction.
I am 51
And the rabbit stays....

58 comments:

  1. John - she is happy with you. Its very apparent, because she is thriving.

    I have two bunnies right now that live under the horse trailer. Im pretty sure they are there because I grain and supplement the horses, and they probably get the feed that might spill. They are wild, but yet will stay still and watch me when I go feed the horses. I have made a habit of saying (in a high pitched crazy lady abominable snowman voice) BUNNYBUNNYBUNNYBUNNIES!!!! when i see them. They now anticipate it and actually COME TO ME.

    Mary loves her life with you, no matter how brief a rabbit's is. They love food, a safe spot to sit, and being out of the rain. You are accomplishing all of that and being a good steward...dont be surprised if any more show up!


    xoxox

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  2. It's pretty unusual for any wild thing to take to captivity, let alone an injured wild thing who then recovers and thrives. She's already answered the question for you :-)

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  3. Here, here. if it was all down to Darwin, many of us wouldn't be here, so Mary deserves any little help she gets..

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  4. I thought you were going to tell us you were pregnant for a minute.

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    1. I thought he was going to say she had died .....

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    2. Or in a stew.!
      I left your eggs by the front door.... Don't trip on them!

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    3. Was that a euphemism?

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    4. Ooh matron !

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  5. You keep her :-). If a wild animal thrives the way Mary has I doubt she's unhappy.

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  6. unlike us I think they live for the present. What is, is. . .

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  7. Mary might be less lonely if you buy her a cuddly rabbit - maybe like those Duracell rabbits that keep going forever.
    P.S. Why have you still got "just over 50" in your profile description Earl? After all, you are in your mid-fifties now old lad.

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  8. She looks fine to me; a wild animal rescue wouldn't release an injured animal if they thought it couldn't survive out there; you've done the same x

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  9. I would happily knit her a cuddly companion or 2

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  10. I see you have already thought of stew.

    That would be my solution...
    But rabbits are a real problem down this way - they breed like rabbits and eat our native wildlife out of house and home

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  11. While I am against keeping wild animals I don't think giving a crippled rabbit a chance at life is wrong. I doubt if Joy Adamson would have turned a crippled lion out to take it's chances in the wild.
    Right on.
    Peter

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  12. you are keeping mary safe and content; you ARE doing the proper thing.

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  13. She seems happy, and like you say she wouldn't survive long out in the wild, so keep on doing what you're doing.

    Btw I'm 58, and still get the urge to throw myself onto a bouncy castle!

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  14. Rabbits are very social creatures. She needs a friend. Surely one more critter wouldn't hurt.

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  15. i think mary needs a friend.

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  16. Keep her as she is....she is defenseless outside her little home. And she does have that happy face!

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  17. Rabbits have disapproving faces anyhow:
    www.disapprovingrabbits.com
    But if she wasn't happy, she would have stopped eating and growing. It´s a small life, yes, but it´s life.
    x
    Els

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  18. Mary looks so sweet. I am glad you saved her.

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  19. I live near a zoo where all the animals are rescues and have something wrong with them. They have large enclosures to roam and are well cared for. I have mixed feelings about zoos, but am glad that these animals can live out their lives in the best possible way.

    Mary looks quite comfortable with her situation.

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  20. "ou don't get the urge to throw yourself head first on a bouncy castle" - I get that urge at least twice a week at my job.

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  21. Mary wouldn't stand a chance past the door of her hutch. As long as she doesn't appear to be pining away she's fine where she is. Have you considered buying her a baby bunny to love?

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  22. You are providing Mary a safe and contented life now. This is her life. You have great instincts John, stick with them.

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  23. If she wasn't getting what she needed she'd have shuffled off her mortal coil and be hopping with Hazel in bunny heaven.
    Jane x

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  24. It's a very nice bunny life!!! It's the right thing...I've no doubt...

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  25. You've done a good thing.

    If I were a rabbit in a helpless state, I would expect someone to save me and that is what you did.

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  26. John,

    You're only as young as you feel my friend. Mary is a beautiful and healthy looking rabbit. Enjoy her!

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  27. Alittle friend would be great company for her. My daughter kept a guinea pig with her rabbit and they were best buds. Bubble and Squeak. Does she have a little run outside? That would give her an even bigger view of the world.

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  28. I don't know much about rabbits but Mary seems safe, well and loved.

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  29. I love that you saved Mary, and she does look quite contented. As the other John followers have said, she has everything she needs and is safe and warm to boot!

    Nancy in Iowa

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  30. She's quadrupled!

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  31. Now you've got the cover pic for your next Easter card. (Yes, I know, I know - one thing at a time).

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  32. Of course she stays - you have saved her from certain death even if she will never know it.
    Have just been out to lunch and met a gorgeous bitch bulldog called Julie. Thought of you and Winifred.

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  33. I think about throwing myself in a Bouncy Castle every time I see one. The only reason I don't is how in the hell would i getup and out ?
    Mary is very happy. If you eat your life is good. I have saved many a little one, even if they didn't live just to give them a warm quiet safe place to die.
    I would suggest a small run for her to get out and about with a large pipe or box for her to hide in if she feels threatened. Going on small "walkabout" is good for the soul.

    cheers, parsnip

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  35. You have done the right thing old boy so don’t give it another thought. I would however desist with any urge to add another to her enclosure. Rabbits are social creatures that much is true but wild or domestic rabbits once they have established their territories i.e. enclosure they will often fight any other rabbit thrown into the mix. They can inflict some very nasty bites.

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  36. I agree, Mary should stay.

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  37. I've always wanted a rabbit but never had one. She's lovely and I would certainly keep her too. Might be a bit of a problem with the two resident assassins though!

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  38. You've read Watership Down right? Life as a wild rabbit isn't quite idyllic. Enjoy her; she is a gentle gift.

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  39. Down and out ... where better than In a village in Wales under John's tutelage. Oh to have a roof over your head, no worries. Born to be wild. Sure. Yet, sometimes it's nice to chill and let yourself be looked after.

    U

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  40. If i remember correctly, you got her from Albert's clutches and figured you'd give her a safe place to die. Only she didn't. In the meantime, you are giving her a safe place to live.

    It's the only life she knows now. As others have said, she is thriving, so clearly she hasn't been told she shouldn't be, or if she has, she's ignored it.

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  41. I saw your title and thought 'Oh, no'. Was delighted that it wasn't a sad story. It's too bad the house would be hostile territory, rabbits make excellent pets.

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  42. Born the be wild, but happily surviving in safety. And comfort.

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  43. At the prime age of 35, I attained my first dependent. A baby dutch dwarf rabbit. He and I had our moments at the start, but in the end, 8 years later, he died peacefully in my arms of old age. We'd become the best of friends. Who knew it was possible.

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  44. Mary is happy. She texted me and said so. Don't take the mobile away from her. She loves chatting.

    Love,
    Janie, who did not expect to get divorced after 31 years and 11 months of marriage but is better off without the ass wipe

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  45. I've had similar feelings about keeping our cats indoors only, although they do have the whole house for their enclosure.

    I think you need to introduce some bunny enrichment activities. In your spare time :)

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  46. Yes you should keep her. :O)

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  47. Of course she should stay. Have a wonderful weekend, John. ♥

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  48. There is no question she will stay. Softie!!!

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  49. I think you'd probably guess what I'd do... But in the UK people do quite often asign human feelings to animals, I don't know if I've eer met a "happy" rabbit and I used to have some as pets when I was younger. I'm sure they feel safe and content but do you think they feel happy like we do?

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  50. my daughter wants a pet rabbit. It would live for about two minutes in our house with Elsie - even if it was in a hutch. I take it William is cool about these things.

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  51. It might be a small life ..... but it's hers, thanks to you. Every life is worth living. :-)

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