Wednesday, 13 February 2013

Victims of the Recession



The new girls in their tempory run

Yesterday a rather sullen poultry owner called John called at the cottage
His five tame hens ( 2 warrens and 3 delicate silkies) needed a new home. The credit crunch and the recession that we hear about every single day has visited his home with a vengeance and through no fault of his own, he has had to up sticks and move to where the work is.
North Wales is a pretty place to live.
But like many rural areas, jobs are not two-a-penny.
I Felt very sorry for the chap.
His birds were beautifully cared for and healthy and before he left, I made sure that his warrens had rings on their legs, so that if he or his wife visited again ( he said they would like to) he would be able to recognise his own hens amid the main flock.
I have read that due to this bloody awful recession we now find ourselves in, animal abandonment and cruelty is at an all time high.
At least these five have found their way to the Trelawnyd safe haven thanks to their caring owner

The weather has closed in again....this rain is seriously pissing me off

36 comments:

  1. Thanks for giving the hens a new home John. They will be well looked after and cared for.

    I hear that a lot of horses and donkeys end up in Romania for meat because people can't afford hay to feed them and they become worthless.

    You are so right about their being very few rural jobs. The countryside seems to be full of empty holiday homes and 'weekenders'.

    You should have your own animal sanctuary John.

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  2. Yes, I think the same, that you are a wonderful carer of animals, and also that we are p******d off with the rain as well. I also feel for that couple who had to move and left you their little flock to take care of. It would break my heart to have to do that, and I suspect it would not do your heart much good if you had to do the same!

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  3. What a sad story.
    Thanks for taking them in John. Jxx

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  4. John - you are a genuinely nice man.
    Hope last night's talk went well.

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  5. I am now wondering what the difference is between a 'tame' hen and a 'wild' one is?

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    1. Warrens are generally more tame than most hens Thomas...they love to be picked up.
      Try and pick up a bog standard hen and you'll struggle
      Mind you..I could see you doing that anyway

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    2. 'Why did the pervert cross the road...?'

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  6. Thank goodness for you John. If we had the space I would be the same. Our neighbour has five dogs, ten cats, three chickens and five ducks so I always pass people her way with their strays. The recession is a cruel thing. I'm just glad their previous owners have a job to go to somewhere, tragic though their situation is.

    Send me any pictures you have. I only suggested George because he is very much in my artistic comfort zone! emparko@gmail.com. x

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  7. Very sad for the man but I am glad he brought them to a place he knew they would be well taken care of.

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  8. John, you are a saint! Thanks for helping, at least, those few hens to be rehomed. So sweet of you to ring them for future viewing too. I always feel so helpless at the animal abandonment when times get tight, and so it's good to help wherever we can. You have a wonderful day, you kind-hearted man. Jo

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    1. No to kind hearted...just practical... My old hens have been dying off... New girls like these will boost egg production.....

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  9. Just thankyou for being so kind John.
    Briony
    x

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  10. How did people find out about you? AS it seems a commen thing people dropping off animals to you.

    Also this may be a daft question, but do hens get attached to their owners at all? Do they pine a bit at first when left?

    Gill

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    1. Generally no gill..they have brains no bigger than a peanut... Having said this..I had a buff Orpington called Lilly who always followed me around and would climb onto my knee given the opportunity

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  11. Yes, the recession has increased the number of abandoned pets and livestock here in the States as well. You are a godsend for that poor fellow. At least that's one thing he won't have to worry about in the uprooting of his life. His hens are probably happier than he is right now!

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  12. Good for you, John! So happy the gals have new digs, and with the most famous egg guy in Trelawnyd, no less!

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  13. Good for you and all the egg eaters in your little village....that had to be hard on the owners as no matter what the pet may be it's hard to part with them.

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  14. I suspect a lot of the 'good-lifers' are getting rid of their hens too. A box of Tesco's 'barn-fresh' eggs probably costs a lot less in the end.

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  15. At the risk of sounding a bit slushy, you're a good person. I feel bad for John though. Poor fella.

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  16. At least they weren't just dumped off somewhere.
    Jane x

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  17. Very kind of you to take the in.... were they accepted well by the "old timers"?

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  18. That's so sad that he had to give up his chickens. That would be so hard to do. Hopefully soon he'll be in a better position and can take them back home.

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  19. sweet as ever John The Dogs. And what will their names be?

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  20. A win for the birds and for you. A good solution and I like the fact that people know they can point someone in need in your direction and you rise to the challenge. Well done. :-)

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  21. You have a kind heart. May you be rewarded with lots of good eggs.

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  22. Small brain or not, they are very lucky hens!

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  23. Thanks for caring so much for your fellow man and helping with his predicament. I'm sure it hurt his heart to have to let them go. Yes, they are lucky to have found you. Many won't, I'm sure.

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  24. I think it's wonderful that you helped out this man and his poor birds! Bravo!

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  25. Mr P, my elderly next door neighbour, kept some ducks, a rooster and two hens. The hens would go to him when he came outside (my guess is that they were hoping he had some cracked corn in his hand), although the rooster would run ahead of the girls, as if to protect them. I do hope all his fowl were rehomed successfully. He suffered a stroke and had to move in with one of his children.

    You are kind to tag John's birds so if he can come back for a visit, he can see "his" girls at once.

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  26. I didn't know the recession had led to an upsurge of animal abandonment and cruelty. That's very sad to hear. It's bad enough knowing of all the human suffering, without animals suffering as well.

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  27. Its lovely to hear you took in the hens,before the duck pond was closed off with chicken wire the ducks would come to my back door for tipbits and would be over like a shot when i filled up the bird feeders hoping to find a single dropped seed

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  28. You are so sweet John.....

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  29. They came to you just when you needed them. That's Karma. ♥

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  30. Very glad they found an excellent home.
    There is a horse crisis in our area. We have been in a drought for several years, and hay prices are through the roof. So many horses are in dire trouble, and the rescues are full to bursting. It's a sad time.

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  31. I am glad that you took them in. As Mother Theresa said: We can not do great things in the world. We can only do small things. With great love. You are a good man.

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