Sunday, 11 November 2012

Before Work

The village Church and chapels hold a multi denominational service at the Village War Memorial this afternoon. A wreath is laid . Words are said, and the number of villagers that attend this tribute to the dead, grows ever smaller.
Last year I went to the service with Mabel in tow. This year I again may well go and show my respects. It's not a good time, 4.30pm.
It's the time the field goes to bed, so to speak.

Last night I called into an unfamiliar hospital ward on the way to work. I wanted to see old Mrs Jones.
She remains poorly.
Unable to focus and speak, she still had a firm grip in one hand.so it was left to me to babble on about this and that with her intermittent grip sort of punctuating my conversation from time to time.
Mrs Jones, along with Auntie Glad was one of the first of the village ladies to attend my very first "Open Allotment" on a rainy Wednesday evening way back when we first came to Trelawnyd..
Her support, then, was incredibly touching.

I didn't stay too long.
The feed pumps and charts reminded me I had a job to go to, so after a few minutes, in our one sided way...............
we said our goodbyes.


33 comments:

  1. You make it sounds like it wont be long John...professional observation?

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  2. Old age is no joke John unless one has one's health, as I am sure you know only too well. My dearest friend here in the village has suddenly had a serious illness. She is back home after a few weeks in hospital but is so very confused. It serves to remind one or one's own mortality - but I suppose,, as a nurse you are constantly reminded.

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  3. Words are said, and the number of villagers that attend this tribute to the dead, grows ever smaller.

    This is out of kilter with the rest of the country, perhaps. Since the Iraq/Afgan conflicts, I have seen more and more people attend these events. Just today, coming back from town, the bus I was travelling pulled in and waited whilst a slow-moving parade (with police escort) was travelling up the road. Tomorrow in Kendal there is a public event/town centre parade for a local soldier who killed himself on his return from Afghanistan. Last week in Manchester there was a similar parade for a police officer.

    In a time when politicians are increasingly out of touch with the interests of 'normal' folk, and more generally people have entirely lost confidence with the traditional pillars of society (the church, the banks, the police, teachers, etc.), then I am witnessing a 'new' type of 'figurehead-less' communality and collegiality, where 'leaders' are no longer relevent, and people - as groups, as communities - are spontaneously taking action for themselves. Perhaps your village is different, but my experience in other towns and cities is somewhat different.

    Of course, there is a narrow slice of the population who 'don't care' (as long as they receive their tax credits and benefits). But a lot of people do care, yet how they show their 'care' is no longer arranged around the institutions of the past.

    Nx

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    1. I think if the "event" was "publicized" slightly differently then more would attend..
      many don't know it now takes place me thinks
      but you are right Nigel, the service in Gwaenysgor (the next village) has a bigger turnout

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    2. There was a full parade to the memorial near us last year, but when I popped up there yesterday, there were just a handful of people standing in a circle at 11am. I think what happens is that the main event takes place at a different memorial each year. It's sad that there are so many in one small area.

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  4. She knew you were there and no doubt appreciated the time you spent with her.

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  5. You're a sweetheart, John. Nothing like stopping off at a hospital on the way to work at one. The conversation may have been one-sided, but the connection wasn't.

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  6. Why at 4.30pm. I think you should have a word with the vicar, and suggest 11am for next year, like everywhere else (or is that the problem?).

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    1. there is one service at the bigger parish church at dyserth at 11am cro... our vicar oversees that
      its the way it's always been done

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  7. A sad day all round.
    Jane x

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  8. ah sad to say goodbye.

    I kept the two minutes' silence this morning then felt the urge to walk round the village this afternoon. I went to the Church while the memorial service was on & stood reading the names on the little crosses laid out.

    My dad died this day several years ago. He was a Royal Marine Commando who joined up at fifteen and stayed til retirement. RIP Dad.

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  9. When my father died we had to wait 2 wks to bury him at the Veterans Cemetery, because a WWII vet was dying every 10 minutes and the cemetery was overwhelmed. I am so very proud of his service, and proud of all those who serve.
    Even if I usually don't agree with the cause!

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  10. Very sad news about Mrs Jones. I am sure that it was a great comfort for her to hear your voice and hold your hand. I bet there are lots of people like Mrs Jones who don't have the benefit of companionship in their hour of need. If angels exist, then you are one John.

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  11. I think your halo is bright and shining right there on top of your head, John, after caring enough to visit Mrs Jones as she lay in her hospital bed. You are a rare person, one of a kind.

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  12. Thank you for visiting.

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  13. I'm sure it meant the world to her that you visited. Sad, that she is so poorly, I hope she is able to recover and remain part of the village life...
    We had a Veterans Day parade here today, so very touching, with old and new soldiers all having done their bit.
    ~Jo

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  14. I can just fathom how you made Mrs.Jones feel at that moment....someone actually cared.

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    1. jim.. she has a delightfully supportive family. I only called in for a few minutes

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  15. I've said it to you a few times before, but I hope that if I'm ever in the place where Mrs. Jones is, I hope there is someone like you to visit me.

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  16. John, whenever I feel my heart go hard in this world, i just visit your blog and am reminded of the good - you have a good heart, John!

    ((((hugs))))

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    1. long time no hear!
      thank you x

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  17. John, send my best wishes to Mrs Jones. Just holding somebody's hand in times like these says things you can't put into words. You're a good bloke.

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  18. I'm sure you know, a warm, friendly touch is like an oasis in a cold, impersonal hospital room. How nice to let her know she is not forgotten in the community.

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  19. I keep wondering when they will stop killing off the cast of Walking Dead! There aren't very many left and it seems like everybody they meet are crazy or evil. Maybe you should volunteer to join them. Think of what an asset you would be!

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  20. EARL GRAY I was in the Derbyshire town of Bolsover this morning and the turn out for the Remembrance Day event was brilliant! It seemed as if the entire population - young and old - had come to pay their respects for all those lovely boys who gave everything for causes they had no part in creating. You need to kick ass in Trelawnyd. We must never forget them.

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  21. John...you have such a kind way with words...many thanks for visiting and extending your kindness!
    Ron

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  22. I was very touched by the fact that you took time to stop at that hospital to pay a visit to that lady... on the way to going to work at another hospital. I think being a nurse is more than a "job" for you; it's a heartfelt service.

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  23. I am joining with everyone else in saying, essentially, that you are a lovely, lovely man.

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  24. Remembrance day is kept by services in South Africa but not here in East Africa. We did our own "remembering" with me having had a dad who fought with the Allies in WWII. You are such a darling John. I'm sure Ms Jones knew you were there and this would mean the world to her. Bless you for your caring nature. Jo

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  25. I hope Mrs Jones does get through it...

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  26. You get what you give in life....and you are very very kind.

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  27. Oh! To live next to a church grave yard. How peaceful.

    It's great to continue to share with someone even when they can't fully participate in conversation. You are more than a nurse or neighbor. You are a friend. Anyone would be lucky to know you.

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