Saturday, 3 September 2016

7d For Milk

Well Putrid Petra certainly put the cat amongst the pidgeons yesterday with her spunky bad manners. I took the anonymous block from the settings last night and returned to Going Gently this morning to see what damage she had inflicted only to note that she had not returned.
It's the fickle face of internet I guess.
Not a great deal happened yesterday. I finished washing down the living room walls with diluted sugar soap, and went to find Harmonica to tell her that the village Friendship group is interested in her keep fit programme.
On the way home with Mary, I noticed Auntie Gladys standing in the window of her house which was once the grandest in the village and on impulse I stopped and knocked on the door.
She wasn't having the best of mornings, I could tell .
She seemed rather vague but admitted that she needed milk , so I went home to fetch her some.
As I decanted some milk into a jug, I scoured the fridge ( still without it's door! ) for some tempting nibbles I could make up for Gladys' lunch ( we are still not quite sure just how well she is eating)
The Prof and I are on a bit of a health kick at the moment , so apart from vegetables , salad stuff and the obligatory pot of cottage cheese there wasn't much I could find but after a bit of rooting I did come across a packet of Geroge's special treat chicken meat balls
" needs must" I told George as I spooned a good half dozen on a plate with some cherry tomatos
And I wrapped everything in foil saving four for George's breakfast.
He watched the proceedings with bright black button eyes.
I then took Gladys her milk, and placed the meatballs into her fridge. Informing her that I had made too many for dinner last night .
" I don't think I've ever had a chicken meatball" she said " I shall enjoy giving them a try"
Her kitchen was, as usual spotless, and the kettle of the aga was heating up as it always does, but the old gal was looking tired and somewhat frail as I was leaving.
" I must pay you for the milk" Gladys reminded herself and rummaged around on the hall table for a moment.
She pressed 7 pence into my hand
" That should cover it" she said gently.
" That will do nicely" I told her.

74 comments:

  1. Yesterday visitors to GG were coming to your defence, saying what a nice guy you are etc.. But today you are feeding Auntie Gladys dog food! What's wrong with you man?

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    1. YP, I think the meatballs are made for humans, but wee george likes them as a treat.

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    2. Oh. I see. I apologise for any offence caused.

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    3. no offense here, dear. just thought you wanna know. {{hugs}} from across the pond!

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  2. Ahh John that made me quite teary, must be cos I'm a sad middle aged woman as PP put it or more likely
    because you are a loveoy man x

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  3. I remember how people always used to pay their way or at least offer to pay for things. I am reminded when I asked neighbours if they would like the slide that my son had outgrown. I scrubbed it down well and it was in excellent condition. I didn't want payment but it would be nice if they had at least offered.

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    2. That is totally different to how I grew up. Neighbours simply lent a hand and no payment was ever expected or offered. We all knew that we would at some point need a hand. Perhaps you should have asked if they would like to buy it from you as it would not occur to me to offer payment if someone asked me whether I would like something that they no longer needed. Crikey, this sounds like I am criticising your post, please forgive me as I most definitely am not

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    3. Cherie, When I was growing up it was considered just good manners to offer payment when a person gave you something even if you had no intention of accepting the payment. It seems that people expect too many freebies these days and people who are less well off are more likely to offer you money than higher paid professionals. This is based on my personal life experience and not a generalisation.

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    4. And yet my experience is that people expect to be paid for everything. I do agree though that the less well off will be more inclined to offer payment

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    5. I think Aunt Gladys is fiercely proud and independent and John has an excellent sense of when to object and when to let her have her own way....

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  4. Your post had me welling up. Aunty Glad is lucky to have such a lovely caring neighbour.

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  5. hey PP, when was the last time YOU did something nice for someone? I dare say NEVER! keep looking after auntie glad, john.

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  6. Bless her. I want to hug her.
    Off to see Kinky Boots this afternoon. Last time I wore kinky boots, I fell off. It'll be nice to see how the professionals do it. :;

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  7. Petra is a sniper. Nobody likes snipers. In the military, they eat alone in the canteens. Even their own comrades don't want to sit with them.

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    1. You surprise me, Tom. "Petra" is nothing like a sniper.

      Snipers (marksmen) are highly trained and skilled professionals whose aim is to not miss their mark. This can hardly be said of "Petra". She reminds me of a drunkard left loose in a Wild West saloon firing at anything that moves and missing - other than his own foot. A spectacle.

      As a matter of interest: Why do you feel so negative about people who take on (both in law enforcement, ie police, and in the military) the invaluable position of attempting to limit further/unnecessary loss of lives?

      U

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    2. Anonymous4:52 pm

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    3. "Petra", thank you for confirming the point I made to Tom. A sniper you ain't. You have no aim.

      No offence to terriers, you remind me of a yapping one, snapping at passing joggers' heels. Don't worry - when your time comes John has taken to his heart, into his home and looked after worse dogs than you.

      Since you mention "intellect" - maybe it's your turn. SHOWTIME?

      Let the drums roll, and where is the ticket office?

      U

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  8. I think you are a lovely man. x

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  9. Many years ago my sisters and I would take turns giving my granny perms and fixing her hair for church. We wanted nothing and enjoyed doing for her (they were not flowing with $$$) My grandpa would insist on giving us a dollar and would get very upset if we wouldn't take it. He was a proud man and it made him feel good .

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  10. I wish you were my mother's nephew. Still waiting for a new refrigerator? I'd be stark raving mad after a day with no door.

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  11. 7p for a pint of milk, lol. With a bit of propping up by the neighbours and perhaps professional services, Aunt Glad can stay at home forever until the day comes. Not a bad way to spend your last innings, especially in a spotless kitchen. How does John Gray's of Wales kitchen compare?

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  12. Anonymous12:41 pm

    Last 3 sentences I struggled to read through watery eyes. What a thoroughly decent person you are, just wish every village had a "John Gray".

    I'm so pleased that you have added the "Anonymous" section, as I don't have a blog and have no idea how to set it one up (neither does the husband). Have been reading Going Gently for some time and look forward to your daily episodes.

    Cuddles and kisses to the animals.

    CMW in Lincolnshire

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    1. start at www.blogger.com; that's how I began 4 years ago!

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    2. I don't have a blog either. All you need to comment is a Google account. 😀

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  13. Lovely post, says so much about a lot of things. Thankyou :) x

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  14. John, once again you prove to me what a thoroughly decent sort you are. A lovely man.

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  17. Sorry about the delete John...I'm still typing on this old widget of mine and it doesn't always work well. Dear Auntie Glad....I hope she perks up again.

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  18. The richness of your life more than makes up for the 7p.

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  19. Just goes to underline the old maxim - it is no joke getting old - or as somebody said (can't remember who) - old age is not for softies.

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  20. what everyone else has said.

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  21. My mum's short term memory was not very good toward the end and often she thought she was out of things when she simply had just forgotten. Do hope this wasn't situation with dear Auntie Gladys but either way you got it sorted.

    How difficult would it be to get Auntie Gladys meals on wheels or would she be offended? Does the milkman still deliver in your village?

    As others have said you really are the kindest person.

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  22. So understand. While MIL lives on her own next door we intercede 20 times or more per day. She insists on staying there so many adjustments are made. She forgets to eat unless I provide at meal times. It is a special task to care for the elderly, you do it well. An above commenter said it best....every village needs a John Gray.

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  23. That's very sweet and I hope someone will do the same for me one day. Except I'd prefer a bar of chocolate to dog food.

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  24. Dear Auntie Glad. I wish I could visit her and bring her meals and treats. What a treasure.

    You're a kind soul, John.

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  25. Bless her, yes, we must keep watch over the elders. They often don't want to tell us they are in need.

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  26. Thanks for looking in, and I'm sure the flower show committee is taking it in turns.

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  27. Bless you for keeping an eye on Auntie Glad. I hope she enjoys the meatballs!

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  28. AHH Bless her, she`s so precious.

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  29. I trust that the 7p milk money she gave you was seven NEW pence!

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  30. you sweetheart good on you for keeping an eye on her. you have to let them go through the motions though the rituals. Don't ever change.

    pattypan

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  31. What a thoughtful, kind person you are, John.

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    1. Anonymous4:58 pm

      Pandering again to a needy ego!
      I feel nauseous

      Petra

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    2. then go puke somewhere else, bitch!

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    3. Oh, Anne, I laughed out loud. Love it.

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    4. we philadelphians tell it like it is. and NO ONE talks trash about one of my friends!

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  32. Neighbours popping in is an effective way of keeping the frail elderly safe, secure and connected to the community. There needs to be more of it!

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  33. The anonymous gateway is back on, no one write anything in reply.please
    Thank you all for comments today, i am on night shift all weekend again
    Jxxxxx

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  34. God keep Auntie Gladys. And you too, John. I'll bet you were the highlight of her day. Precious days, those at the end. xoxo

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  35. I can't remember when milk was 7p a pint, I remember a loaf of bread reaching the lofty heights of one shilling and my Nana being outraged.

    It's brilliant that you are looking after Auntie Gladys, she deserves attention and care, she's a lovely lady.

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  36. Petra is undoubtedly basking in the glory of all the attention your blog provided for her. She's undoubtedly too overwhelmed to comment.
    But you can be sure she's reading the comments on this post.

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    1. Petra - you should definitely start your own blog. It just might be a hit! You can call it "Old Fags Love Petra".

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    2. Nice idea Jon, but she should call it "Me, myself and I".

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  37. You have a heart of gold, John. I had a wonderful old aunt who used to forget to feed herself and then get a bit ga-ga through low blood sugar. Keeping her fed was important, and something 'Home made' warmed her heart as well as her stomach. I hope she is feeling better soon

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  38. Love it. Sometimes the less said the better!

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  39. John, today you wrote about what is going on in your village (I need to catch up) and your followers love it or we wouldn't read it.
    I have be off blog reading for a week (some bad stuff) and trying to catch up. I don't know who PP or what he ? wrote but whatever. Some people just like to be mean I guess.
    Please keep writing your blog and I know I will keep reading it.
    thehamish send wurfs to George.

    cheers, parsnip

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  40. Your a good man John Gray!

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  42. If I were to be living in a small village when I might have reached an age even older than I am now, I would want to have a neighbor like you. Meanwhile...while I still have reasonably good physical and mental health myself, I hope to be a good neighbor to others.

    You describe your surroundings so well. I could see that hall table at Auntie Gladys' house. xo

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  43. What a gentleman you are, John! I would be thrilled to live in your village and have you and the Prof for neighbors. Thank you for taking us with you on your daily rounds.

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  44. I've been reading for awhile but usually keep pretty quiet. Thank you for sharing these stories of your life. It think now more than ever with the state the world in we can all use hearing about these gestures of kindness.

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  45. At least you had milk, I would have had to give her a Diet Coke and peanut butter and jelly sandwich! :-)

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  46. Anonymous2:49 am

    When my grandmother was still alive and living out on the farm, she would ask me or my mom to pickup milk and some other item such as crackers or a loaf of unsliced bread at the bakery. Before you left for home, she counted out, to the penny how much she owed. She would never allow anyone to pay for any of it, no matter how small the amount. It was just how it was done - no more, no less. Aunt Gladys is lucky to have you. You're a good person with a big heart. Ranee (MN) USA

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  47. One of our brigade stalwarts is getting elderly now and needs a little help around his property. We went round a couple of times and chainsawed his logs into firewood for him, and he insisted on donating to the brigade. We said no way, you have done so much for the brigade, but he said if he couldn't pay, he wouldn't feel like he could ask us again, so of course we had to agree. He is a true statesman and reminds us all how to behave. A shame not everyone takes note! :D

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  48. Does Aunty Glad have someone looking after her; or who pops in regularly? She sounds as if she might need someone soon. Well done John.

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  49. Glad to get the update on Auntie Glad, I've been wondering about her the past few days and was about to ask. Good of you to help out and to do so in a way to respect her dignity. (Also glad you kept a few of George's treats for him :))

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  50. My 1st comment on your blog (years ago), which was modestly refuted by you, was that you are an angel. This sort of thing will not convince me otherwise.

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  51. Great post, John - every community needs people like you. There's so much negativity in the media but every day little acts of kindness such as yours are happening, mostly unreported and unremarked except by those involved. Thank you for opening a window into life in Trelawnyd, and please go on doing so.

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  52. Seriously, it's OK. My mum has been worse than that and is still alive and kicking butt. Thanks largely not only to my sister who lives reasonably close but also to the incredible kindness of neighbours like yourself. You're doing real good. Mind you, my fav George might not think so if you keep giving away his chicken meatballs.

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  53. Ripping off a confused old lady by selling her off milk that was kept too long in a fridge without a bleedin' door! Jeez what a bastard you are mate (Do I need to add a detestable smiley face to flag up humour? I refuse, but there does seem to be some misunderstanding of humour, or even humor, around. I rather think YP's was misunderstood, for example)

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    1. Maybe even "Petra's"? If you assume she/he/it was just trying to be funny then either she/he will be delighted that you finally get the joke or she/he/it will be pissed off that you think all the bile is offered in jest. Win-Win. Don't block, just go "Ha ha ha :) :) LOL"

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