Monday, 28 October 2013

Hey Jude


The Great Storm Jude passed us by with barely a gust.
The villagers didn't have to huddle within the safety of St michaels's thick stone walls as Auntie glad rang out a warning to the parish on the church bell.
And no one held hands behind the pews singling " Abide with me" like they did at the end of the 1950version of  The War Of The Worlds
Everyone just stayed at home and watched Downton Abbey

I think we are all in need of some some sort of disaster...... Not a real one, I have you know......I wouldn't be that flippant seing that people have actually been lost down south when Jude hit land, no..what I do mean is that a national " threat" is long overdue , one that galvanises the population into action and a sociability that stops this " little bubble" existence that most people now inhabit.
Something not too life threatening
Just a calamity that would bring out the Best of British Women's institute mentality out in all of us.



44 comments:

  1. so glad to hear it missed you!

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  2. Watching Downton Abbey - now that would be my idea of a disaster...

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    1. Not been watching either

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  3. I think that they went a bit OTT about the storm { apart from the South Coast } ...... I can't see any damage here BUT, we are going to a six course dinner in Spitalfields tonight and there aren't any trains !!!!! I can't believe it ........ it didn't seem that bad to me.
    Downton was good though ....... are you watchng ' Breathless ' John ?
    XXXX

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    1. Fraid not watching either!

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  4. Obviously it's a national disaster because it hit the south-east...anywhere else and it wouldn't count for much.....

    On a more serious note, we have some VERY tall trees in our garden, and we were mighty relieved they were still standing this morning, even with all their leaves still on.

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    1. Oh, Nota Bene, i have the same complaint on this side of the Pond. If it hits DC or NYC, it's all about the sky falling, but once it veers northward, meh.

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  5. It was more stormy here in Kent than they originally forecasted. A 17yr old girl died when a tree hit a static caravan in Edenbridge (not far from us). RIP sweet thing.

    My friend's horses are ok and this little hobbit woman dragged many 'normous branches and 4 sacks of deadfall from the middle of the field. Even at mid-morning it was blowing a gale and nearly knocked me off my feet. Won't complain at all, we got off lightly.
    Hope everyone else ok.
    xx

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  6. Glad you're okay. :-)

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  7. ...You mean something like a cataclysmic disruption to scotch egg production?
    By the way, isn't it interesting than whenever a bad weather "event" threatens the south of England we hear all about it in The News. But if a similar "event" threatened North Wales or Yorkshire it would get barely a mention. In fact, Trelawnyd could be consumed by a giant Rock Monster and we'd only know about it when the Ordnance Survey amended their maps.

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    1. Yeah, same here in Cumbria, quite a lot of people from South of Birmingham actually think Cumbria is part of Scotland.

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    2. YP..your right.... I also detest the bbc news when they comment about a foreign aircraft disaster.....
      Stating no British subjects were amongst the dead

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    3. The news does that in Canada, too. I always thought it was to put minds at ease about loved ones who might be travelling.

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  8. We've been lucky, John -- just a bit blustery here and now it's blue skies and sunshine! Glad to read you are all safe and sound!

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  9. Sad that lives were lost. Saw photos of lots of damage in London streets. Sad that it takes a tragedy many times to remind us of our bonds of togetherness. Happy tho that you escaped any damage oh and Chris and the animals too!

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  10. Glad to hear it missed you.

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  11. Two young lives lost I've heard... so sad.
    I agree with you about the need to pull together though.

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  12. My son and his wife are in Portmadoc this week so I am relieved to hear that the storm didn't reach there John. It didn't affect us either - I just feel sorry for all those down South who had to bear the brunt of it.
    I do agree about needing something to galvanise us all - but am not sure what it could possibly be.

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    1. We need an invasion from mars

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  13. 'Twas a noisy night here, but did Jude scare us? Naah - nah - nah - na-na-nah - Naaaah!

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  14. I would call millions of people living in poverty or near-poverty a national threat, John, but probably that's not the sort of thing you're thinking of. I'm not sure we all live in little bubbles either. I think most of us are well aware of the wider social and political problems, we just don't know what to do about them.

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    1. Oh nick
      All I want is a collective hug and for someone to serve tea on street corners

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  15. Glad to hear all is safe and sound.

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  16. I like my little bubble. To which I am happy to retreat, having spent too long already anguishing over how to save the world and, like Nick, have come to the conclusion I don't know what to do about it.

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  17. I remember on 911 when I was working at a large city hospital in Hamilton, Ontario. Due to the proximity to New York (1 hr flight), we were put on Orange alert. We were told we had to work late, be prepared to cancel elective surgery, clear beds, charge pagers, move supplies etc in anticipation of the likelihood of hundreds of New York'ers needing medical care and being transported to large trauma centers close by, regardless of the fact we were in Canada.. Plans were in effect to send surgeons and supplies if needed and to cover the absences of those that went to help. Of course none of it was ever needed as there really were so few casualties. Despite the horror of the day, for that few hours when we were hopeful for survivors, the energy and sense of community at the hospital that day was amazing. We would all have joined forces and done anything to help. It was a boost to our humanity that day despite the tragedy. So, I understand completely what you mean.

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    1. How kind of you all to be so ready and willing to help us.

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  18. It is good that the anticipation of the storm was worse than the actual event. Weathermen get all hyped up with even a sun shower, and more times they are wrong than right.

    From being in the eye of a storm more times than I care to remember, I can tell you what you said is true. Neighbors that were invisible before are there to help when disaster happens.

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  19. We do tend to go overboard, but then I'd rather be prepared than not.
    Must be my old girl guide motto ;)
    Glad it passed without too much damage.
    ~Jo

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  20. Sad to read about the 3 deaths in GB, now the storm is hitting Northern Germany (2 deaths and chaos, Hamburg's S-Bahn can't drive because of broken trees). Berlin is getting just now a windy box on the ear, but - till now - not serious.

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  21. Happy to hear that your are all fine.

    cheers, parsnip

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  22. We need the same "rise up together" event to occur on this side of the pond, too. Sadly, I don't think even another World War would do it. There's no sense of group duty or sacrifce; it's always "Not my problem." I'm still in awe over what the Brits did to survive the Blitz, though. You all can rest on your laurels a few more years, I think.

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    1. My mother and grandmother were in a house as it was bombed during the war.

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  23. After Hurricane Katrina and then Sandy, I don't think anyone on the east coast will take a storm lightly. My son's car can be seen in news clips about "Sandy" and its flooding. It is white car, floating away.

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  24. Glad to hear you and kith and kin (furred, feathered & otherwise) are safe. Crises will bring out the best in most of us - but if we'd all just do a little every day it could have the same impact. No one can save the world alone, but each of us doing our bit, wherever we are ... can help.

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  25. Glad that you and yours are safe.

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  26. The storm seemed to take a more southerly track than expected, missed us pretty much too. Glad no feathers were ruffled in the Ukrainian village.

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    1. Us too. Not a fallen branch in sight.

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  27. I'm so jealous that you have Downton, and I have to wait until January.

    Love,
    Janie

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  28. *snickers* Gotta love the Women's Institute. Nobody bakes pies like 'em.

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  29. I see where you're coming from (You're on about Zombies right?)

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    1. All the time kev.......all the time.......
      I forget how old am I
      How's the little one?

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