Saturday, 10 December 2016

Brew-ha-ha

I've just slept a solid ten hours, and do feel marginally better.
This morning, after a somewhat energetic chase worthy of the opening free running credits of Casino Royale I caught the last remaining bantam cockerel and took the poultry up to the barn at my friend Eirlys' farm.
When I was away The Prof had to deal with concerns from villagers about bird flu. Free range birds however safe in our minds bucks against government guidelines.
And people are scared.
For the first time in years the Ukrainian Village lies Empty, and this morning I am reminded of the sad end of Fiddler On The Roof 
Hey ho

32 comments:

  1. I predict a rise in the price of Scotch Eggs!

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  2. much ado about nothing; keep the people scared and afraid. that's what the politicians do over here. much easier to control the masses.

    resist. by any means necessary.

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  3. Goose farms are becoming as quiet as that right now.

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  4. ...they are coming back right?

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  5. During my recent all too brief UK holiday, I heard about the poultry edict and immediately thought of my friends who keep just a few chooks. (Is that the right word)
    Glad that you are feeling better...your own trip to London sounded like fun.

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  6. will they be coming back?

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  7. The free range turkey and chicken farmers in this area welcome this measure where they have many thousands of birds and do not want disease in their flocks which means mass slaughter if it happens; they have shelter for them and are keeping them in. The mild weather is the main downside at the moment to keeping them in though.

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  8. The bird flu scare will come and go. You will get your little flock back, no doubt. For now, will you go care for them at your friend's house? -Jenn

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  9. That is a sad and lonely sight. I hope things get back to normal quickly and your feathered tenants can be returned.

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  10. Our yard lies empty and the birds are confined to the hen house. They are not pleased - at least they weren't until the farmer arrived with the left overs from our pasta lunch, which sent the into a ravenous frenzy (and yes we had fed them)

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    Replies
    1. I remember when Mrs. Nesbitt use to give spaghetti to her chickens. They would go crazy and I loved the sounds they made while eating it. Maybe they thought it was a bowl of worms ?

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  11. Poor birds....hey ho. I`ll give you the usual line `better to be poorly now than at Christmas`, hope you pick up soon.

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  12. Sunrise, sunset - Heigh ho. :-(

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  13. We've spent the afternoon neting over Chicken World, it's the best we can do here but should keep out all wild birds and their droppings. It's the dense netting that we have on the net tunnel, thank goodness LH over ordered and we had a whole extra roll. The only other alternative would have been to house all fifteen chickens in the polytunnel!!

    The chickens seem to be tolerating staying confined to barracks and the immediate parade ground at the moment, but I sense a revolution brewing ;-)

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  14. On the positive side, it will give the grass time to grow.

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  15. Might be a good time to super clean the little houses in the Ukrainian Village and do any repairs. I'll bet you will miss them.

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  16. Glad you are on the mend. I do hope the refugees can come back again. A contented chooky burble is a wonderful thing to hear.

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  17. How sad. :( we had to lock our chickens up for awhile after seeing a coyote run off with one in its mouth. A different kind of government.

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  18. I hope the "peace" will allow you to rest and recharge and regain your health. I also hope the Ukrainian Villagers are allowed to return soon.

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  19. This would be a good time to clean out the coops, rake and lay down some hay or what one does at the Ukrainian Village.I hope this bird flu goes away fast.
    Get Better Soon !

    cheers, parsnip

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  20. Hi John, will the birds stay enclosed until the scare is over? When it's time for the guinea pigs to be housed (so that my cats and dogs have the run of the property for the day), I have to dash through the wet undergrowth in my DIL's forest garden to catch Hurricane. He's the other male guinea pig whose afraid of the alpha male and hides in the most awkward places. xx

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  21. I took one look at the photo and immediately thought of Fiddler on the Roof. Fascinating.

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  22. Stupid government officials. It's much easier for poultry to pick up and pass around diseases if they're confined in too small a place for a period of time. (Hence the problems with commercial flocks.) Most backyard coops are made to be used at night only.

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