Friday, 23 September 2016

Auntie Gladys Leaves The Village


It was " errand " day today.
George went down to the groomers early and needed picking up before lunch. His groomer, Louise has a kind heart and Made him comfortable with all his lumps and bumps. She has a soft spot for the old boy as George restored her faith in Scotties ( she had been nipped by a bad tempered terrier years ago)
I had to pick up the Prof's favourite jacket from the tailors,post some stuff at the Post Office and have already shot around the village trying to organise a " Flower Show Post Mortem meeting"-(the committee needs to allocate funds for this year's good causes ) unfortunately I've not marshalled a quorum as yet though I did see Mrs Trellis through her living room window gayly practicing her piano scales when I passed .
There is a new resident in Mrs Jones' old bungalow and I met him this morning as he puffed on his pipe during a break in gardening. He is a retired merchant seaman and couldn't look more like one if he tried, what with his pipe, bushy grey beard and weatherbeaten, crinkle eyed, slightly shopworn look., I have nicknamed him, unsurprisingly , Popeye.
Pat, the animal helper ( sporting a very natty Mary Berry hair do) promised to give me embroidery lessons during the winter and I couldn't find Graham the chap who has repaired our shed roof  in order to pay him for his work. Mrs Frazer seemed impressed with his work, when she passed and also made a point of praising our new windows with  a knowing " I see you have come into some money " kind of look.
I tell you all this as perhaps it underlines the pace and urgency you feel when things need to be done and deadlines albeit small deadlines need to be met, the quick pace takes over and feelings often are not acknowledged


You will understand the last sentence in a minute.
In the middle of these jobs I walked the dogs and had a rather " fraught" moment with Winnie who found and adopted a half deflated football. Separating a bulldog from a wonderful toy like this is a feat in itself. I was hot and bothered when I eventually got to Auntie Gladys'
It was a planned two minute 'pop in'
Knock on the door, say I was going away for a day or so and could she use up some cake and boiled ham I had knocking around. Of course I'd just bought the cake and ham, and the ruse was for her to feel as though she was doing me a favour.
He son in law opened the door.

It felt all a bit rushed.
He explained that they were taking Gladys out for lunch ( I felt a tad awkward holding cake and ham)   Then they were taking her to a nursing home for some respite care  as he and his wife were going on holiday for a week.
I knew this was on the cards, but hadn't realised it was quite so soon.
He thanked me for what I and others had done for Gladys and gave me a slip of paper. On it was details of the nursing home which included the telephone number and address.
"We are giving these out" he said carefully , and added slowly " she won't be coming back home"
I nodded
It all happened so quick.
I presumed Gladys and her daughter were elsewhere getting ready
and I felt I had intruded just a little on family plans, so saying I would visit her next week, I took the cake, the ham and the slip of paper and left the sunny kitchen, still spotlessly clean and neat as it always was........with the old table in the centre on polished red brick tiles and the aga standing proud in the inglenook.

I was late picking George up from the groomers and gave him the ham to eat on the back seat on the way home. The cake I gave to the girl behind the till.
" what's that for?" she asked cheerfully
" A thank you" I said without thinking

Only after I had stopped to take George for a walk did I realise the enormity of what had just happened. No more good natured Flower Show Meetings around that kitchen table. No more bags of scones tied carefully around the cottage door knob. No more ...no more...

I , like many from the village will drive over to Holywell to visit, Monday looks like a good day to go, I thought, as a balding George lumps and all, tottered his way happily through the railway path.
And I stopped for a few minutes and sat on a bench overlooking the coast and a bright blue sky

And had a good cry.



168 comments:

  1. Well, dammit. This has made me cry too. So, so sad. Please, when you go to see her, tell her that so many people care about her and wish her well and great happiness in her new home from one of them.

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  2. Well, now you made me cry too. I feel as if I know Aunt Gladys myself...

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    1. My sentiments exactly. Its like we know her and will miss here and wish her peace.

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  3. Even when we might be expecting a big change, learning about it suddenly, even when the news is delivered quietly, is a shock.

    I'm now having a bit of a quiet cry myself. xo

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  4. As will we all reading this. An end of an era...

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  5. I'm sorry to hear this John. Is she going willingly? It'll be a terrible blow for her to know that she's never going 'home'. She's become an old friend.

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  6. Crying right along with you,
    xoxo
    Barbara

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  7. What a sad day.

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  8. Ooh, flop.
    Aunty Glad has become known to us all as 'our aunty' the lack of her presence in the village will have a great impact.
    The nursing home is in for a treat.
    We all love you aunty Glad !
    ~Jo
    xx

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  9. Aww bless, such a shame, she'll be sorely missed by you and the other villagers. As others have said, I hope she knows it's a permanent move and that it's being done with her consent.

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  10. Oh my.....
    This is very difficult for accept, John. Sending warm hugs to you.
    'Auntie Glad' was my grandmother and aunts. I will miss her but look forward to your visits with her.

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    1. 'This is very difficult to accept.....'

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  11. It's a damn shame people can not be cared for in their own homes, so much better for them.We all grieve with you, the village, and Aunty Glad.

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  12. That is VERY hard!For her, for you, for the village, for us all! Trelawnyd will not be the same without Auntie Gladys. I will miss her. Idea, when you visit her on Monday, take a video of her and let us know how she is doing! xoxo

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  13. Your news has just punched me in the guts too, but you'll have felt like Winnie's deflated ball. So very sorry. Hope that when you visit her she'll still be displaying as much spirit as she's always done.

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  14. "They were taking her to a nursing home for some respite care as he and his wife were going on holiday for a week"

    I do wonder why he said "respite" rather than "moving into a nursing home" - working in a nursing home our respite stays were always short, often just enough time to give the caregiver a short holiday all other admits were considered "moving in". Perhaps the family is having difficult accepting the reality of the situation.

    Sad news for your village.

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    1. Respite, with a view of staying

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  15. Ugh..this took me right back to when we had to do the same with my mom.Tough time for everyone. If it's any consolation, she loved it. The attention, the new friends. And her medical needs were met with ease there.

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  16. What a sad day for Trelawnyd. I'm ready to cry myself.

    Would it be possible for you to get us Auntie Glad's new address? I'll bet she would love an avalanche of cards and letters from all over the world! What do you think?

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    1. ooooooooooooh, I LOVE this idea!

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    2. i'll post it when things settle down somwhat

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    3. What a great idea Jennifer - kicking myself I didn't think of that :-)

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    4. Thanks for thinking of this, Jennifer. It makes me feel that there is something I can do half-a-world away for Aunty Glad at this time, if only to let her know how loved she is no matter where she is.

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    5. what a brilliant idea Jennifer!

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    6. Count on a card from Canada!

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    7. Brilliant idea!!!! Count me in!

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  17. The end of an era John - both for Aunt Gladys and for you. I do hope she is happy there and settles in - it is so hard but probably the best solution.

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  18. A sad day indeed... thinking of you x

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  19. My Auntie Nelly lived alone after my Uncle Matt was killed in a mining accident in the early 1960's. She pottered about her little house for then next fifty years. In her late 90's she finally couldn't take care of herself any more and moved to a nursing home. When I went to visit she said "I should have done this years ago. There's bacon for breakfast, they bring me cups of tea and there's always someone to talk to."

    I sincerely hope that Auntie Gladys has the same experience.

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  20. How sad that she should have to leave her village like this , it almost feels as though her status deserves a more grandiose exit , streets lined with villagers applauding her ....what a bloody loss this is

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  21. I'm sad for you and the rest of the villagers but do agree that Auntie Gladys with her friendly outlook, will indeed enjoy her new home.
    Hugs for you and best wishes to Auntie Gladys.

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  22. I was going to ask how anyone can practise piano scales "gaily" until I read about the departure of Aunt Gladys. "Respite care" is surely something different from a permanent move to an old folks' home. I wonder if Aunt Gladys knows what's going on and if she has agreed to it.

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  23. Poor old Gladys. I hope she has been properly prepared for this. I am worried for her. Very worried.

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  24. Eyes puddled up but holding a good thought. My Dad entered a nursing facility two years ago. He's meeting more people, eating more balanced meals, and goes out on group adventures just about every week. Such a busy guy at 96 years old! It took a little while to adjust, but he loves it now. I will hope for the same for our Auntie Glad. X

    Ps: I love Jennifers idea!

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  25. Oh no, the village won't be the same without seeing Auntie Glad at the bus stop, so smartly dressed and with her dangly earrings. The end of an era and a sad day for the village. I agree with Jason - perhaps a tribute should be in order when the time is right?

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  26. Sorry to hear this. I really feel for Auntie Glad, expecially as she thinks she's only going in for respite care. I hope she settles in to her new home.

    Maybe Auntie Gladys could be collected from the home to join in the future flower show meetings?

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  27. I can hardly see to type for tears in my eyes. Dear Auntie Glad. The end of an era. I hope she settles in to here new 'home' and can be comfortable there. Visits from her friends and old neighbours will certainly help. Over here in Canada my heart goes out to her and to all those who will miss seeing her in her traditional place so very badly.

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  28. This seems a sad blow to the entire village.
    Here's hoping she copes and she has frequent visitors.
    Keep your chin up.

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  29. Time passes, things change - some for better and some for worse. Hoping this is a good change that extends the quality of your dear friend's life. It is so hard to leave the past behind, to be visited only in memory. But what wonderful memories they are!

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  30. So sad. Just the other day I was thinking how long would Auntie Glad be able to stay alone... now it is done.

    Well, don't give her up so easily! You will just have to move the Flower Show meetings to the nursing home! Or, as Witch Hazel suggests, fetch her back to the village for meetings.

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  31. Ah, bless her, no choice in the matter either I'm sure. I hope she adapts well.

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  32. Jennifer's idea is great! I would definitely send a card or two!

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  33. I hope they care for her well there and she is moderately happy. I don't think it's right that they didn't tell her she isn't coming back. she will spend a lot of time packing her stuff waiting to go home. at least that's what my friend's mother did. I don't know her or her family of course but I wonder if this transition is for her benefit or theirs. anyway, I know you won't abandon her John.

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  34. What a sudden shock for you and the whole village. Good luck to Auntie Gladys.

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  35. Oh John, I'm sorry x

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  36. A good cry is exactly what was needed. Now to get cracking in true John fashion and get on with visits and rosters and other good things. I hope the nursing home is a good one. I know you will give it a very close inspection which is a comfort.

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  37. I am crying and don't even KNOW her. You have been a good friend. Sad when the family has to decide this is the best option for her.

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  38. When I first saw the title of your post I thought Auntie Gladys had passed away! Having gone through this with my own mother, I know that there may be more concerns that her family has than meet the eye. In any event, it's a difficult decision to make. I'm sorry that your good friend won't be there for a pop in visit any longer. You were always very kind to her. A very sad situation indeed.

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    1. I agree...its a terrible time for her family...and its a difficult decision that had to be made....i believe two others from Trelawnyd live in the home btw

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  39. Oh John. As most of the others I am crying too.

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  40. Bless you, darling, I understand.
    We have cried so many tears lately and also desperately tried to comfort him as my cousin wept in fear of his illness. We took him to the hospice yesterday. In the last few weeks there has been an awareness of 'no more' holidays, days out, driving, getting to the toilet, conversations, and now he has eaten his last meal (toast and ice cream), before the decision to call the ambulance.
    Is it better to be aware of the 'no mores' before they happen or the realisation afterwards.
    With best love to Auntie Gladys, you (and the whole village too)
    xx

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  41. I am sure there will be many tears after reading this. The village has given Auntie Gladys so much love and support. I hope there will be many cards and visits on a regular basis to help her to adjust. I must be a very painful decision for all.

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  42. I do hope that Aunt Glad knows what is going on and agrees. I have just left an 87 yr old lady's home. I look after her dog. She is in poor health at the moment ( high BP and dizziness) and her son took her to the doc yesterday. Pills have been prescribed but I don't exactly know what they are for……she won't take them in case they make her feel worse!! She really should be in a care home near her son, who lives 2 hours drive away. I bear the brunt of everything that happens! I got " dragged in" after being kind enough to help with the dog. Been through all this with my Mum a few years ago, and don't want it again, but no choice. Sorry…needed to "get that off my chest". I am not a kind enough person to be a carer…I have no patience! Hope Auntie Glad will be OK. From what you said about her she seemed to be coping just fine.

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    1. The ultimate decision whether she stays will be gladys, but she is getting increasingly frail at home

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  43. I am so sorry for you John you will miss the old gall but I am happy for her she is surrounded by so many caring friends and family she is a lucky lady.

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  44. Crying here also....the village will be a bit lonely. We all love her so much. I hope you know that ....Stiff upper lip and all that.

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  45. I am truly sorry for you John. She will relish your visits and care to come. Growing older is a punch in the nose. I'm thinking maybe 15 years if I'm lucky, and would like to spend them happily.

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  46. I could not have held out that long. Around the corner and I would be bawling. I think I would write her a note and tell her now what she has meant to the world.

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  47. The end of an era as they say.
    Does the new 'Popeye' look like Uncle Albert by any chance?

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  48. Ahhh Auntie Glad .. this is very sad and she is lovely and deserves to be cried over .. I am weepy about it and I never actually got to meet her !
    But you brought her to life for me and all of us .. I am sorry. At least you can visit her ... there is always that as consolation.

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  49. I had a tear in eye and a pull on my heartstrings when I read this.

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  50. 'She won't be coming back home' now that made me burst into tears. The end of an era for you John, I love the idea of sending cards when she is settled. Sweet Glad xx

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  51. Yes, good old Aunt Gladys ... you brought her so very vividly to the attention of many dotted all over the world. Linking straight into your observations last night, let no one say that "real" friends can't be made in blog land. As real as, once upon a time, our teddy bears, dolls and imaginary friends were to us. Oh the sorrow when they got lost or were beyond repair.

    I sincerely hope that the "respite" is just a tester. In many ways it'd be better for the likes of Aunt Gladys to just live it out in their own abode - straight from my heart since that little sparrow of my spirited great grandmother did just that, unaided, till she died at nearly 98 or so.

    Here, John, have my tissue. It's only been used to wipe my own tears - over Aunt Gladys and the march of time.

    U

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  52. This is sad. I hope you are OKx

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  53. Auntie Glad is a village institution (in the nicest possible way !), and such a feisty lady, that I hope she settles happily in her new home. It's such a sad day for you all. Trelawynd will just not be the same.

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  54. Oh, this does seem sad but for someone who is as social as she is it may be a new and exciting chapter in her life. New friends of the same age and new people to sell flower show tickets to!
    Living alone at home is held as an idea but in reality can be very isolating despite best intentions.

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  55. I cried too when I read this, Gladys is a dear old lady. I hope she will be happy in her new home and that she has a steady stream of visitors from your village. There are so many options (paid home visitors, home nurses) to help people stay in their homes, if it isn't her choice to move that is sad. I volunteer at a very upscale retirement home and lots of the residents look rather lost. Hoping for happy times for Gladys.

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  56. Oh John! This is heartbreaking. Does Auntie Gladys know she is not coming back or think it is short term? I am crying too. What a shame that there was no big send off for her. x

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  57. I also cried when I read Auntie Gladys is leaving your village. I like the idea of you posting her address later. I for one, will send her a card! On a brighter note, my 87 year-old MIL has been in our retirement center for the past two years. She's nothing as nice as Auntie Gladys, but eventually she settled down, made friends and has such a busy social life now, she warns us when or when not to visit! Auntie Gladys will be an asset to the nursing home - I hope they appreciate her.

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  58. I feel as though I know and visit Aunt Gladys because of you. I will miss her very much. I hope she will do fine and enjoy her new home.
    I hope she will be OK with this move. I am crying over this.
    I too was going to ask for her address.

    cheers, parsnip

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  59. So sad. I can't see her liking it there :-(

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  60. Oh no! I've come to realize through your posts just how vital Auntie Glad is to the village, and how important she is to you. My heart is sad for you, John.

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  61. Aw...we have come to know and love her. I hope it all works out. This can't be easy for anyone.
    I understand the tears, John. Sudden change can do that. Sending a hug, Deb

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  62. Aw...we have come to know and love her. I hope it all works out. This can't be easy for anyone.
    I understand the tears, John. Sudden change can do that. Sending a hug, Deb

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  63. Oh John what sad news. Hopefully she will settle and be happy x

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  64. Oh, John. When I read the headline I thought she had left more than the village. That fierce, resolute, great lady has become one of the people I regret never have met in person ( you are running a close second and Winnie is there too ) Here today is gray and raining, so appropriate for the way I feel now. Go visit, and I am sure giving her spirit she would be the one to accept this much better than those who love her, and those who admire her.
    Maybe you could take the girls with you once, with their parents approval,to brighten Aunt Gladys day a bit and make her feel the place a little bit like home?

    The toll of time is some times truly unbearable.

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  65. Oh, dang. It feels like the end of an era.

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  66. I'm sure your whole community will miss Auntie Glad. This is a very hard decision for her family and not something they will have done lightly. Hopefully auntie Glad will embrace the care and companionship. I think we're all having a few tears tonight.

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  67. Hoping Glad settles in to her new home x difficult and sad day - hugs x

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  68. So sad about Aunty Gladys. We are dealing with our own similar situation here and it is so very hard so I totally get how you and her family feel. I hope that all will be well for Aunty Gladys and that you are OK too. I forsee a whole new group of friends in your life as she introduces you to her new friends! xx

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  69. Through you, I feel like I know her, and I, too, am very sad. I just heard today that a woman who treated me as her own when I was little went to a nursing home because of dementia. It seems that I should have stopped in to see her those hundreds of times I thought about it because she's now living her childhood again and wouldn't know me. I'm sending a hug to Aunty Gladys!

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  70. Yes, please tell her that many, many people with her well and will be thinking of her. Dear Gladys, what joy she has given us.
    I look forward to your tales of your visits to her, she always has something so valuable to say.
    And now I'll have a good cry myself.

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  71. What you might not know is Auntie Glad was that she was the personification of hope for me. My mother developed dementia and was in a nursing home at 80. In a wheelchair by 82. Died soon after. My mother in law is now in a nursing home at 78 with dementia. Neither one of them made themselves a meal years prior to going into a nursing home. Both had already lost their husbands.
    I loved every time you posted about Auntie Glad because I thought, "That's how I want to age. Independent, strong, self-sufficient."
    I wish her well and hope she settles into her new surroundings with ease. -Jenn

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  72. I haven't had the pleasure of hearing much about Auntie Gladys before today as I am newbie but I'm sorry to hear of the news. Hope the visits go well and she adjust nicely to her new home. We just had to put an uncle in hospice care and even though it's necessary it's still hard. Take care.

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  73. having a bit of a cry myself, I'm going to miss her

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  74. Such sad news. I had my cry this morning when I read your blog. I do hope it had been discussed with her and she was willing to go. The ideal would have been to have a home care giver. I do hope she can adjust to her new surroundings. I'm sure it will be difficult for her due to her sight and hearing disabilities along with being in a strange place surrounded by strangers. My heart goes out to her, but she seems to be a lady with grit and I pray she will be fine. Give her a big hug from us all and get that scone recipe! She is famous and is loved from people around the world. Sending her love from NC, USA! And, you take care. I know you will miss dropping in on her and seeing her out sunning!

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    1. It has been discussed with her at some length i think

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  75. Oh John, how sad that Aunty Glad has had to leave her cottage. I must confess, though, that after previous posts concerning her actions, I did wonder how safe she would be if she stayed alone in her home. I hope that during her first week there, she will come to see that she is in a good place with people around her and being cared for in a safe environment.
    After losing my beloved dog in recent weeks, I seem to be in a permanent weepy mode, but tonight my tears were for that lovely lady of Trelawnyd.

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  76. Sad news indeed, but on the bright side I'm sure Gladys will keep the other crumblies entertained.

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    1. You are right dave....it may all be for the best.. Lets hope so

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    7. Auntie Glad is fiesty dear bird and will make new friends and be well looked after, and will hopefully enjoy her carefree permanent vacation. It is sad for those who love her, but she may rise to the occasion and enjoy her new life. You will see her. We all love her and i shall send beautiful cards from Florida to her when her address is provided. Gladys will have a new adventure and we wish her well. John your heart is as big as the world. Thank for sharing.

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    8. Well done Millicent, you got there in the end!

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  77. we are all dying. the older we get, the faster it goes.

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  78. I hope the prof is home soon to give you a hug x

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  79. I am sorry John.

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  80. A sad, sad day for the village and for all her friends there, but a happy, happy day for the nursing home. She will bring life and laughter to it that's for sure.

    I do hope she settles in and copes okay with all the change though.

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  81. Well that obviously blindsided you, I'm sorry the news didnt come with time to get your head around it.

    I'm glad you were there at that moment, it would have been so cruel to hear about it after the fact.

    It seems to me that Aunty Glad is likely to make the change with grace, as she has lived the rest of her life.

    My love to you all

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  82. Kylie, you summed my feelings up exactly thank you

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  83. That it had to come doesn't make it any easier.

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  84. That has made me feel so sad, so very sad...and I was sad already, The end of an era.

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  85. Some tears here in Oz today too but totally understand their thinking. Hopefully she will realise she is safer there where she is looked after and allows them to take care of her. Pleased to hear there are others from the village there too. That should help.

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  86. Well, here is another Aussie shedding a tear. :/

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  87. My 91 year old Dad passed the day after last Christmas. My Mom, 89, with Lewy body dementia is now in a nursing home to cope with that. I live and work 1500 miles away. It is never easy.

    I hope Glad does well but it'll never be right - never. Love your blog.

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  88. Weeping in the desert. (This hit particularly close to home.) I'm especially touched how you planned to gift Auntie with (ahem!) 'left-over' food stuffs; that she'd be doing you a favor, so to speak. God bless ...

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  89. If I read the comments I won't stop crying 'til Sunday, so I'll just say thank you for writing this, one of the most devastating things about the inevitability of time I've ever read.

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  90. And just one more thought - how much poorer a world this will be, when the last Gladys goes...

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  91. So very sorry for the harsh news today. Thank you for sharing your friend with us, & we look forward to more stories from visits. What a sweet woman. Sending virtual hugs your way.

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  92. So sad - Auntie Gladys and George, both elderly, frail, and so loved. A good cry was the only sane reaction.

    I hope Auntie G settles in well. If her personality is essentially the same as it used to be, she will likely enjoy the ready company. And she will certainly enjoy her visits from you and other villagers.

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  93. I'm sorry it had to be the way you found out, still, better than later.
    It comes to us all, eh? Sooner or later.
    One of the few comforts I've found with the arrhythmia issues I have is likely I'll be pretty functional till suddenly I'm not.
    It sounds like she's lived life with grace and dignity, and I expect she'll deal with this latest the same.
    Cheers, John.
    Mike

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  94. My heart sank when I read the title of your post, John. I agree, it is a passing of another beloved character from your village life. I'm sure all will rally round Gladys once she gets settled but it will leave a hole in the fabric of village life, for sure.

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  95. We are all of us, Gladys. Time waits for not a damn one of us. Visit often because as you know. those who get the most visitors, get the best care. it is sad but true.

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  96. Thank you Donna...much truth in that. X

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  97. Right now people all over the world are having a cry for a wonderful lady they never met in person but know so well. We all love Auntie Glad and wish her well.

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  98. And do bring as much joy to her in her new digs as she gave to the village.

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  99. Amen to that, Will.
    She is of the Greatest Generation, John. I also hope she was agreeable to this.
    She will be missed by more than she knows. Please let us know how she is doing.
    God bless you all.

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  100. You will brighten her days when you visit. You've shared her life with us and we will all miss the stories, but that's the old stories, you will share new ones with us. Hugs to you!

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  101. Now that you say they have discussed it with her at length I feel better about it and am sure she will have some more happy days ahead of her. I thought you meant they werent telling her anything when I first read. Phew.

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    1. What she remembers of the conversations is another thing rachel

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    2. I agree but in principal it is better than I thought that they just sneaked in and said she was going for respite because they were going on holiday and would be home again soon. At least they haven't lied to her.

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  102. This saddens me also, John. I know you will miss auntie Gladys. But on other thoughts, I know she will be loved and cared for better there than on her own at home; I wish she finds happiness, peace and serenity in her new surroundings.
    Greetings Maria x

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  103. Oh that makes me feel like crying 😭

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  104. Oh my, your post made me cry as well. At first when I saw the title I thought the worst, but then I saw it meant something less final but still earth shattering for you and other villagers. She will be safe and looked after and will love your visits. Sue x

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  105. Maybe, just maybe Auntie Glad will be relieved and could enjoy the company ..... Hoping the transition will not be too traumatic for all involved..... & hopefully she I'll be able to pop into the kitchen and rustle up a few batches of scones for the residents.
    Wishing you well Auntie Glad. XXXX

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  106. I would cry too, having gone through this with my mother. So sad

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  107. It's wonderful that you are making a point of visiting her next week. It'll be good for both of you.

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  108. Very sad news - I do hope that the choice is hers.

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  109. Ohhhhhh! Hugs and shared tears.

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  111. Very sorry to hear this John, I hope the care home is a good one and not one of those ghastly ones we were talking about a couple of weeks ago. Give Aunty Gladys all of our best wishes when you visit.

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  112. May she be blessed. It's the end of an era. Thank you for giving us the pleasure and honor of meeting this fine woman.

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  113. I'm welling up! Never met her but grown fond of her through your eyes John.

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  114. Oh, I'm so sorry, John.

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  115. Sad for you John . . .
    Endings take a good cry . . .
    Hope you and Gladys can enjoy some cake and visits soon . . .
    Not the same though . . . not the same . . .

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  116. I cried yesterday for Aunt Gladys and for John too as well as just the facing of ageing for all of us.
    This morning I just read through all the comments and I had a lovely sudden thought of all the wonderful cards she is going to receive from so many parts of the world- won't the home be amazed and make a lovely fuss of such a special lady! Let's be sure to follow through on this.

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  117. Aunt Glad epitomizes so many of my late mum's friends from church : widowed, fiesty, fiercely independent, the very backbone of every community. The impossible needed doing, they were there and did it. These women shaped my life while your stories, John, about Aunt Glad have warmed hearts around the world.

    Sending a hug to all

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  118. Bless you John - let's hope Aunt Glad settles into her new home really well, hugs from me for you John xxx

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  120. Oh, Auntie Glad! My heart breaks for her loss of independence, although I understand why the need for more care is necessary. When my father was old, he always refused to stay at a nursing home for any brief respite care for my Mom because he was scared we wouldn't take him home again. Unfortunately, that's a common way of "making" people transition, isn't it? I hope Auntie Glad adjusts quickly to her new circumstances and that she'll still get lots of visits from her friends.

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  121. My brother and sister and I moved our mom into an assisted living facility last December. She has an apartment with most own furniture. It took her a while to transition but now she is always out with her walker, chit-chatting and gossiping with her new old friends.

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  122. Oh my John, I'm so sorry. We've grown to love Auntie Glad because of you sharing her with us. It sucks when things change in life before we can even adjust to it.

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  123. You made me cry. I'm sorry things are changing. I'm glad you'll visit her often.

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  124. Dear John. I rarely post on the blogs that I follow. I am happy just having a nosey but I just wanted to say that I feel for you. I really do.

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  125. I am so sad as well... all the way from California USA
    Ruth in Oxnard California

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  126. There really are no words - at least, that haven't been said already. Yes, of course, crying.

    I wish this hadn't happened, but since it has, will hope one thing: that is that whatever happens, it is okay with Gladys. I wonder what her thoughts are, and actually, what any of us would think at her age, when what you'd really like (to be physically able, but have all your hard-earned good sense) is no longer in the cards. Not that I know Auntie Glad personally, but I've never gotten the impression that she had a shred of stupidity in her - she may be ahead of everyone on this. One thing I like about her is her enormous ability to live, so hope that remains.

    Holding good thoughts for her. Mary

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  127. There really are no words - at least, that haven't been said already. Yes, of course, crying.

    I wish this hadn't happened, but since it has, will hope one thing: that is that whatever happens, it is okay with Gladys. I wonder what her thoughts are, and actually, what any of us would think at her age, when what you'd really like (to be physically able, but have all your hard-earned good sense) is no longer in the cards. Not that I know Auntie Glad personally, but I've never gotten the impression that she had a shred of stupidity in her - she may be ahead of everyone on this. One thing I like about her is her enormous ability to live, so hope that remains.

    Holding good thoughts for her. Mary

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  128. Oh My God John.... truth be told i don't really even know you or Auntie Glad but as i sit here i'm trying my best to keep my eyes from overflowing and just cry right out loud.. because hubby is in the room and i don't think he'd quite understand about me crying that Auntie Glad is going in the nursing home and nothing will ever , ever be the same again... Auntie who?? But i feel like i've gotten to know the small piece of you that you share online... and i'am so very sorry for everyone involved....... and i think she affected a good many lives in your little village... Hugs! deb

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  129. Getting older sucks.

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  130. Bless you John, for being upset about an old lady going into a home.
    You, and we, will miss Aunty Gladys and all the scones but it was bound to happen sooner or later. Better that than you find her on the kitchen floor one day, a not uncommon fate for too many old ladies who live alone.
    It's the inevitable end if an era, but I look forward to future tales from the old folks home.

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  131. So sorry but I don't get what's wrong with dying at home. Does she want to go? Or does her family want her to go?

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  132. Dear Aunty Glad,I hope she doesn't feel "pushed" but maybe the family and she had an "arranged time". It is all fraught isn't it. My poor old dad has been suffering with his legs and his wife has Alzheimer's, she kept "escaping" the house and he was worried sick... her daughters have put her into a "home" for respite.. 3 weeks later my Dad is feeling better and feels sad that his wife is no longer there...he feels like he has abandoned "a puppy" in is own words... life can be cruel and sad at the same time.
    Love to all at this sad time.

    Jo in Auckland, NZ

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  133. I read this and shared your pain John. I also had to leave it and come back to it as its something that really got to me. I hope Aunt Gladys enjoys her time in the nursing home and I hope she understands that she won't be coming back. Its always a trying and upsetting time but it will be nice for you to visit and talk to her maybe not in her little home but will be nice . Take care John x

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  134. From across the pond,up into the mountains, I send my heartfelt affections to you and Aunt Glad. Visitors will help her I'm sure, but....it's not home. So sad.
    I'm nearing this with my own mom, aged 95. It's all on me, my other siblings say let her be. Well, we've already had a very bad fall, that required surgery, and no end of problems. Sometimes I wish she'd just go to sleep,and not wake up. Now, I'm trying to work on my
    own wishes when my time comes. At 73, it isnt that far off.
    Feel your pain and share your tears.

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    1. Sue I feel for you. My mom just sat down and went to sleep in May this year aged 94. It is a blessing to be able to stay in your own home but given how people are so far flung today it isn't always possible. I hope it works out for you. Anna

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  135. John, I just had a good cry too. Aunty Glad has always reminded me of my Aunty Blod and, to know that she won't be able to keep her kitchen spick and span makes me so very sad. Bless you for letting us know about this. Hugs. xx

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  136. Oh dear, I am sorry to hear this. :(

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  137. Even knowing this was coming it hit me and I can somewhat feel what you felt on a smaller scale of course.

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