Tuesday, 1 December 2015

Hero


It's 60 years since Rosa Parks refused to get up out of her bus seat for a white man
Her strength of spirit is still wonderfully inspirational 


26 comments:

  1. A true American hero and for once, a hero who actually gets credit for her actions.

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  2. oh miss rosa, we still have so far to go...

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    Replies
    1. But the US has come a long way

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  3. Let us hope we keep moving in the right direction!

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  4. Yes indeed. A hero. We need more.

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  5. The pendulum of equality needs to stay in the middle and not divert to the right or left. Tricky.

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    1. It always needed to be in the middle

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  6. I know I could not have been as brave as Ms Parks. That took gumption.

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  7. What many people don't realize is that it wasn't a spur of the moment decision on the part of Ms. Parks. It was planned. She knew she would be arrested and possibly beaten or killed, but she volunteered for the protest anyway.

    Love,
    Janie

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  8. What courage Rosa showed and what an amazing woman.

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  9. A few years ago, we drove down to Michigan and visited the Henry Ford Museum, which is an amazing collection of all different kinds of things and displays of various eras. One thing that is at the museum is the ACTUAL bus on which Rosa Parks made her memorable seat choice. You can get in the bus and sit down and take pictures. I've never had that kind of courage, but it was very moving to be able to be seated in that bus and really think about what it must have been like. -Jenn

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  10. She's always been a hero of mine; I've never understood the US institutionalised racism.

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  11. Such courage and conviction and how sad that it had to happen anyway..humans are strange.

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  12. I'm afraid that my hero-worship for the lady (is one allowed to say 'heroine' these days?) was somewhat tempered when I learned that she wasn't the first to do what she did, though she WAS the first whom the newspapers and radio/TV of the time picked up on. That doesn't diminish at all what she did, it was still undoubtedly acutely brave, but I do wonder if more due ought to have been given to her predecessor(s?) in the act..

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  13. It seems crazy that it was only sixty years ago.

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  14. Imagine what the world would be like without the bravery of ordinary people!!

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  15. Raybeard's comment is interesting. Let us just recognise her as representative and honour her all the same.

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  16. Whenever I am asked if I have a hero, the answer is always Rosa.

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  17. Oh yes, I listen about her story on the Jeremy Vine show, rightly remembered, what a brave and ground breaking lady.

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  18. It's amazing to think that something like that happened in my country of birth in my lifetime... and there's still so much more road to travel. But isn't it wonderful what one individual can accomplish?

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  19. I remember those terrible days very well. The southern states were the worst. But there was also hidden discrimination in the North as well -- against black people and Jews, as well as Catholics. A classmate of mine in a New England high school had her whole family threatened by people in their neighborhood, because her father wanted to rent a house to a black family. And believe you me, it is still going on, especially in the deep South.

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  20. Beautiful soul that Rosa....

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  21. I saw a biographical television show about her. She was asked why she did it and she responded that she was tired. As a white male, I would never expect anyone, woman or man, young or old, to give up their seat for me, well not yet. To me, that was the ugliest form of entitlement.

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