Monday, 12 May 2014

Dog Etiquette

Albert waiting for George to pass him on the garden path..he ambushes the Scottie
On the path everyday, giving him a quick smack up the arse as he passes
Nervous old Meg with George

 Yesterday I somewhat pompously educated two kids on the right way to greet a dog on a lead. I think I scared them ( and their Sunday dad who was walking with them) when I stopped their excited " run up to say hi", but it's something I am quite strict upon when out in public.
My rules are:-
  • Always ask the owner if you can approach
  • Stop short of the dog and offer your hand
  • Wait until the dog approaches you before you pat
It's not rocket science.
My dogs are all wary of strangers. William is the friendliest, but will only approach a new person

after he is able to sniff an extended hand. After this cautious first introduction, he is likely to climb
into anyone's lap if allowed.
Meg is the most nervous dog, and will hang back from any introduction unless the visitor is in the 
house, and George will just bark a friendly but incredibly loud " arrrooooooo" at anyone he does not 
know., which sends most nervous individuals scurrying for the hills.

William. Mr nice guy
 Out in public, it is Winifred's reaction to strangers that amuses me the most., for she will actively
ignore anyone and everyone who tries to make a fuss of her. Yesterday the kids on the country path tried every trick in the book to get her attention and all she did was to dead eye the pair of them and turn her back . Like Meg, she will only greet visitors who are invited into the cottage.

Winnie showing her " dead eye"
The children who approached the dogs yesterday, may now think just a little before they gallop up to another dog in public again. It's just a mark of respect.......after all, I wouldn't run up to a perfect stranger and rub his ears, pucker up to his nose and tickle his chin without at least saying  a polite " hello" first
Well.....not unless he's Russell Crowe ..............

79 comments:

  1. You could write a whole blog on dog etiquette.

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  2. Another absolute 'don't' is never approach a dog which is tied up alone, waiting for its owner to come out of a shop or whatever.

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    1. So many silly fuckers do

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  3. I agree with the etiquette rules. I always ask strangers whether or not I can pet their dog. You wouldn't walk right up to someone and cuddle their infant without their permission - why would you walk up and pet someone's dog without permission?

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    1. We have a local farmer who always states simply " do not touch my dog" without further explaination
      I found out later that it had badly bitten a visitor to the farm

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  4. tru fax. but your final line made me snort me coffee!

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    1. Leave em laughing Anne Marie......leave em laughing

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  5. Another one to remember is to not approach a dog left in someone's car with the window partially down. It is always a joy though to meet a dog who is all friendly investigation when he/she sees a new 'friend'. Even so, I always follow the tried and true method of asking my new 'friends' companion if it is all right before making any overtures. It also never hurts to always have a few treats in your pocket.

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    1. Dogs and small children can be a recipe for disaster

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  6. Good rules to follow - if you're a dog lover I think you can tell which are friendly or not. p.s. your garden is looking great.

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    1. It's tiny,and looks bigger than it is... It's all optical illusion

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  7. I hope someone sends Russell Crowe your picture, so he can be on the lookout for your unannounced affection.

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    1. I'm puckering up in readiness

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  8. Good thing to do. Ev is very cautious of dogs and we've taught her to stand back until she's told she can stroke them. One of the reasons I don't want to get a dog yet as it can make young children too confidant around other dogs and that's when accidents happen.

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    1. I always worry about by dogs and very small children
      I think Winnie and William would be safe but the other two,ay snap at tiny fingers.....
      Btw.....any more foxes kev?

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  9. Very good advice.

    Both my dogs are happy to meet anyone and let anyone pet them but Rosy has a cut off point if a stranger goes too far and will show her teeth.

    But if folk have observed your rules of etiquette and spoken to us first she seems to give them a lot more leeway and will remain on friendly terms throughout any encounter.

    Suky's 'gruff gruff' Puggy noise makes children think she is growling where as in reality she is in seventh heaven being petted and stroked..

    I loved your last paragraph ... and I would love even more to see Russell Crow's reaction to your over enthusiastic overtures :-)

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    1. A fist in the Gob me thinks
      But a girl can dream

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  10. Great post and photos, John. I have gone through this with Kane on leash for 10 years. Deb

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  11. George is absolutely gorgeous and most sensible. I'd much rather bark at any stranger than let them pat me uninvited. And if anyone I didn't know tried to rub behind my ears I'd definitely show my teeth. There's a limit to all liberties. Surely?!!

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    1. Scotties all woof very loudly at strangers......
      But as soon as introductions are made... He'll sit on your knee all day...

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  12. I feel the same way John. Always amazed at how people let their kids run at dogs. We had young neighbors who used to chase my dogs and pull tails.

    I also have issue with people who let their dogs off leash in parks. If you are in an off-leash park then you likely know your dogs is fine with every animal running it's way, but a couple of dogs I've had (although good with other dogs) have needed a quieter introduction at first. Yesterday while walking old Frenchie, an Irish Woolfhound came charging at us. I know the dog so knew he was friendly, but my poor old dog was petrified and tried to run and hurt his foot a bit.

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    1. And the owners of lead less dogs will often look at YOU thinking that YOU are in the wrong

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  13. Don't understand what you mean by 'Sunday Dad'? Unfortunately, most kids are bombarded from birth with soft,furry toys that are supposed to denote real animals so it's not their faults that they think the real thing will be just as cute and cuddly. It's all about teaching them the correct 'etiquette' I suppose but I'm sure the majority of kids don't approach strange dogs with any kind of malice aforethought.

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    1. He looked like a divorced dad......I don't know why I thought that

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  14. I keep away from dogs. They jump up, bark, bite, and sniff my crotch.

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    1. Thought that was Pascale?

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    2. He doesn't bark.

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  15. You've done those kids a favor whether they realize it or not.
    I'd like to know the outcome of the first picture with Albert. it looks like a bit of a showdown, or maybe George is waiting for Meg to go first?

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    1. Got it in one Marty
      Albert will ambush George on the path daily
      Smacking the terriers bottom as he tries to pass.
      It's a game Albert has played for years

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  16. I love the first photo LOL
    Oh yeah, I saw this happen in a park once and was pissed off I almost said something. A woman brought her Labrador puppy to the park and all of a sudden, all these kids from ages 3 to 8 ran over, some with their parents, and were cooing and petting it and squealing over it and she was laughing and saying it was okay.
    No, it is not okay.
    First off, the parents should have taught their kids you do not approach a strange dog IN THEIR FACE. Second, the owner should have corrected the kids and said, "Please, he is not like your own dog and you cannot run at him. you will scare him and he may nip." It was a teaching moment that everyone failed.
    We have a dog, a somewhat fresh Jack Russell and our son has been taught to always only pet her on the back and to never go in her face. He also knows not to run at strange dogs. Even the ones he knows on the block he knows to wait until the owner says it is okay. Seriously, how hard is it for people? You know if the the dog bites someone it is suddenly on you and not the fool who ran at the animal. Sorry, this is such an easy thing for parents to teach and they rarely do.

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    1. Fifi, see my previous post reply for the answer to the first photo....... This " ambushing" happens every day

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  17. this is such a problem with teddy. she does not like anyone. however, she looks like a stuffed animal. i can't believe the brainless twits of parents who let their kids run straight at her. and yes, she bites. and yes, it hurts!

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  18. Forgot to say your garden looks lush - off out in mine if the rain ever stops! x

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  19. Essential rules for us dog owners, John.
    What gets me is when grown women approach with their dogs on leash and start to squeal and make a fuss in this very high pitched voice!! Makes both dogs go crazy! Sophie gets so wound up she could knock someone off their feet....then what? I just don't get it.
    Oh yes, what a great series of photos here mister!

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    1. There is one thing more irritating than the squeal
      And that is the loud baby voice

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  20. Beware Russell Crowe!

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  21. Dogs often seem keen on sniffing people's crotches as a "get to know you" opening gambit. Having observed this behaviour, I tried to apply it when meeting women for the first time at university. Needless to say the canine approach wasn't always welcome. It also put me off dried fish for a long time.

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    1. A lovely comment about a lady's charms YP
      YOU CHARMER YOU X

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  22. I would like a tour of your flower garden please as it looks good.

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    1. It would only take you a couple of minutes , it's tiny

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  23. Russell Crowe? I bet he would only be friendly once inside the cottage...like Winifred & Meg!

    Cindy Bee

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  24. Jack loves all 'comers', but Jill will give a low warning if someone she doesn't know approaches. I fear I will be giving that little talk to my new neighbors. Jill is very protective, even if she is the sweetest little girl in these parts - once she gets to know you.

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  25. It is probably all natural for a child to run up to any dog/horse/cow/goose/sheep enthusiastically when they see one outside, but it is the parents' job to explain to them - preferably BEFORE they get close enough to the animal to scare it - that this is not the way to go about making an animal's acquaintance.
    Very good of you to explain it to the kids. I do hope they'll remember.

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    1. Cartoons have a lot to answer to

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  26. A friend's dog used to go crazy whenever anyone knocked on the door but paid no attention to those who just strolled in through the usually open back door. A sign saying "burglars please knock" would have done the trick.
    Russell Crowe visit Trelawnyd often does he?
    I'm sure he will now he knows what's on offer.

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    1. Well mr Crowe's family to come from Wrexham which is only 20 odd miles away from Trelawnyd

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  27. The garden is looking bootiful!

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    1. Not as lovely as yours jess

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  28. From the time they could walk, we taught our children never to run up to any animal. That they had to get permission to pet from the owner. Simple. It's not the kid's fault, in my opinion...it's the parents. My kids have always adored animals, and believe me, they would have went full out to love on any furry creature!
    John, your garden is just beautiful!

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    1. It always looks sweet in may..........the rest of the year it looks rather tatty

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  29. I don't think I'd proffer my hand to Winnie if she was giving me the 'Dead eye'

    Long time lurker here. Just found out how to comment, or rather I think I have! Here goes....

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  30. We (wife and I) had a dog eons ago, a newfy/husky mix, huge, black and friendly. Somehow he thought baring his large teeth was a way of saying "Hi, I'm bear!"....he'd come out when somebody drove up, teeth bared and wagging his tail. People always misunderstood.

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    1. Better that, rather the other way around!

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  31. Oh, that seemed to go OK.

    I'm very excited about the nuptuals. You don't know me but I feel I know you, so forgive me if I get a bit personal.

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  32. Lovely photos John x

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  33. Good advice, and it could save those kids - and their parents - from future grief.

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  34. Well said. Years ago I had 3 tiny Yorkshire Terriers and I got really peed off with people who passed us who assumed they could just pick them up because they were small and cute. Luckily they were all fusspots and didn't mind the attention but even now I get fed up of telling peoples kids that my dogs do not want to be cuddled and do not want them to try and pick them up cos they will bite. Do they or their parents listen? No they bloody well do not

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    1. Love to see any passing child picking up Winnie

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  35. I love your troop of canine friends. I agree there is a way to introduce yourself to a dog !

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  36. I would trade you an American barn for a terrier's 'arrrrooooooo.'

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    1. I would love to say yes... But I could never trade George's arrrrroooooo

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  37. Russel Crowe, now I'm with you there. Been to France for the weekend and missed reading your blog. Back now, hurrah!

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    1. Lol...you need to get out more
      Mind you...having said this.... You just HAVE been to France for the weekend

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    2. I think I need to get out more with a Smartphone. I completely missed Conchita Wurst and Eurovision.

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  38. A child recently ran up to my dogs and blew a loud raspberry in their faces. When one of my petrified dogs barked, the child announced "You naughty dog!" The mother just smiled at her child while I explained that my dog was frightened by her blowing a raspberry at her and please don't do it again. (My son grew up knowing that it was rude to blow a raspberry at a human being never mind a dog!).

    When I was 14 I was looking after a neighbour's dog. It was kept in a shed with an iron gate as a door. When I went to let the dog out, two children were laughing and poking sticks through the bars of the gate at the dog. I shouted at the children, they ran off and I let the dog out. Poor animal, he was shaking violently so I (stupidly) reached out to stroke him to calm him down. He attacked me and tore the flesh off my finger and I ended up in hospital. My neighbours offered to have the dog put to sleep but I wouldn't hear of it, and told them that the boys and been tormenting their dog.

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    1. More cases of bad people rather than bad dogs

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  39. Good for you, John. You may have saved those children from being bitten in the future. Yes, the parents should have taught them this lesson.

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  40. I so agree with what you did. I have always taught my children how to greet a dog. And I so agree with the answer of bad people as opposed to bad dogs. I see it all the time living in a border state.

    cheers, parsnip

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  41. One day as I was about to leave a grocery store I saw a young boy run up and grab my dog from behind. The kid got nipped - not badly and not enough to break skin - but he was howling when his mother arrived on the scene. By then the dog and I were well away.

    I love your garden.

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  42. My sister had to move from her neighborhood because some idiot woman ran up to her Leonburger (170 lbs.) and tried to kiss him. He nipped her to show his displeasure. Of course, she claimed it was all the dog's fault. But I agree with you about Russell Crowe....

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  43. I'm glad they listened, we have a nervy Collie as we are her seventh home she really doesn't like strangers.

    Some people still try to stroke her even when they are told not to.

    This is why I prefer pets to people x

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  44. Lessons learned. Now I finally know how to approach strangers. I had no idea they didn't like to have their ears scratched... except for Russell Crowe.

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  45. I had a very vicious Doberman once. (Rescued) I never let her near anyone. One weekend my horrible ex brother in law was visiting, he got pissed ( as usual) and got all brave and went out in the garden with her. She tore a lump out of his arm. Great judges of character are dogs!

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