Tuesday, 11 April 2017

A Worrying Turn

Blogs talking about the oldest and one of the youngest Village characters
Go figure

It's been public knowledge for a little while now, but the care home that Auntie Gladys is in has been recently under close scrutiny by  the Welsh Care and Social services inspectorate after it breached 11 regulations in the care of its residents.
I have not blogged about all this as in many ways it was not my place to say anything, but very recently things have changed yet again.
We visitors had no idea that things were not quite they seemed as Gladys seemed very happy with her care, and although the place looked somewhat shopworn there was nothing in the home that unduly concerned me, nothing, that is, that I could see on an hours visit.
I know that Gladys' family closely monitored the situation, and have kindly kept a few of us here up to date with what was happening.
Tomorrow, it has been decided that the remaining residents will be moved by social services to another care home and Gladys will transferred to a more appropriate place on the English border some twenty miles away.

I've got the details of the new home if any villagers need it.
I'll be visiting next week and I may post the home's address here! A plethora of supportive cards may underline to te managers just how well loved Gladys is!( hint hint)

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-north-east-wales-39469229

57 comments:

  1. This is awful, and we read about it happening so often these days. I do hope that the move will not unsettle Auntie Gladys in any way, and that she will settle happily into her new surroundings.

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  2. That's terrible, I wish we took better care of the elderly and some of these firms didn't treat it like a massive cash cow that it must be fore them. The staff are underpaid (in my opinion), facilities are rubbish and yet it costs a fortune. I like the look of the American style retirement villages, although I've no doubt they cost a lot of money!
    Hope she settles in well if she's moved.

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    1. Thank goodness the local authority was on the ball

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    2. @kev - they ARE expensive! I cannot afford it, and I am not old enough to go there!

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    3. They are expensive and some of them (the one I worked in) are a nightmare, I wish there were a better way..

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  3. How sad, but unsurprising. That inspection report is depressingly familiar. It's why some families eventually resort to hidden cameras in relatives rooms. The shiny public façade can often mask 'behind closed doors' neglect. Big business and vulnerable people don't mix well.

    For anyone with dementia in a 'care' home, the outlook can be very grim. That's why I chose to become a full-time carer for Dad. (It was the hardest thing I ever did in my life, but at least I had control.)

    I do hope all goes well for Auntie Gladys. You're a good person John, to still keep visiting.

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    1. There are others in the village that go too! Thank goodness for them

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    2. That's nice. (We got next to none.)

      I've read the full CSSIW report now. One of the most disturbing parts is where residents refuse to speak to inspectors, for fear of 'reprisals' from staff.

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    3. That stuck with me too.....the manager changed in january !

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  4. Oh shit. Be interested in your report after your visit John.

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  5. How very upsetting. I hope everything works out for Auntie Gladys. The elderly and ill are so vulnerable.

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  6. What a relief that Social Services has been monitoring things and that Gladys has family (and you) to watch out for her interests. It's shameful, but a relief that something is being done to protect the residents.

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  7. This is very upsetting to read. Hope Aunt Gladys will be fine with the move. Her family will be there so that is good.
    Thank you for keeping us updated.

    cheers, parsnips

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  8. Shocking, that's so worrying. I hope the move doesn't unsettle her too much. It's hard to get used to new places.

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  9. It happens on this side of the pond, too. It's so scary.
    You are such a good friend, John. Please keep us posted on that dear lady.

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  10. Goddesses paws John! Thank goodness Aunt Gladys is ok. Please pass on all our best wishes to her next time you see her and I hope being across the border doesn't unsettle her too much. It's incredibly worrying that a community treasure like this is in a place that looks ok to a professional like you, who might notice such things and yet is under such scrutiny. It is scary how many other homes, not blessed with such supervision, might be harming our elders and it makes me, as a childless fifty odd woman; incredibly worried about my'twilight' years with no family to protect my wellbeing.

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  11. I hope Auntie Glad will be happy and better cared for in her new home. Best wishes to her!

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  12. I do hope that she copes well with the change. I "consulted" on a couple of facility closures, I was surprised by how emotionally upsetting moving was. No matter how bad the conditions, the place is home for the residents, they are being forced from home. It is not easy. They need a lot of emotional and family support.

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    1. When i first found out about the problem , i almost emailed you

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  13. Thank goodness for Gladys' family keeping an eye on her. I hope the move goes as smoothly as possible and that her new home is good to her.

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    1. Yes they are monitoring the situation very well

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  14. Well, crap! I thought it was kind of strange that they let her bake in the kitchen, and for some reason I thought she was in a smaller home.

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  15. I am so glad that Gladys has a family (and friends) who are monitoring the situation. Too many people don't which is how the problems become endemic. Keep us posted please.

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  16. best wishes to auntie glad on her next adventure. it is good to see her pix above from last year's flower show. I miss hearing about her.

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  17. As Kev mentioned my parents lived in a retirement village but you have to be independent to live in these places. They paid $3,500 for a 2 bedroom apartment. After my mom passed away my dad needed long term care and so we had to move him. He ended up in a semi-private room which cost $1,700 a month. He had a very rapid decline in there and I'm sure that that was partly due to the environment he was in. A very long story, and I regret that he had to go in there, with family visiting every day, but we really had no choice. I hope Auntie Glad does okay in her new home.


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  18. Oh god bless her, I am happy that Auntie Glad will be in a good place but it is so sad to me that when we think we will be all snuggled in , in our home that we have lived in for so many years, seeing the rest of our days from that home, those windows, those familiar sights out there .... but no .. a bed in a white room with noises and lights at night and unfamiliar people everywhere .. I hope I die before I get to that age and the family wants to put me somewhere neat and tidy and not upsetting their lives.

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    1. When my 86yr. old mother was offered a place in a hospice we turned it down. She would have been so hurt, she wanted to die at home. My sister in law and I took it in turns to nurse her until the end.

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    2. You are a good daughter.

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  19. This happens way too much. So happy that Auntie Gladys will be in a healthier, cleaner environment, God bless her.

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  20. So glad her family kept close tabs on the situation and has removed her to a safer location. The dear old soul deserves the very best.

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  21. So sorry for the upheaval to your Aunt and the circumstances. I hope the new place will be better.

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  22. I would think that any and every place would be delighted to have such a dear and sweet woman as Auntie Gladys in their midst.
    I hope she finds someplace like that and is cozy and cared for as she deserves. I wish it for all the people there.
    I would love to be able to send her a card if ever that opportunity arises, and yes, please do keep us informed.

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    1. Sadly they seem to only welcome the person who is paying the always too high costs of "care" homes.

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  23. Bless her. I do hope another change does not upset her. I so wish some arrangements could have been made for to have in-home care. In some cases, it is less costly than being put in home. It is good that the powers to be kept a close watch on the facility. I have read horrible stories about elderly care homes.

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  24. Things are the same here. Even the good Assisted Care homes have problems. Caregivers are paid little, there is a high turnover in staff, and many patients who have few visitors are at the mercy of unhappy, overworked employees. Thankfully, Auntie Glad has people who will advocate for her.

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  25. I wish I could bake some scones and visit Auntie Gladys with you John - we'd all have a good time over a good cup of tea.
    Thinking of her and thankful she has good people such as you to keep an eye on her.

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  26. Oh no....I think of her often. An address would be wonderful to be able to send cards. Hope she is out of there quickly and as smoothly as possible.

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  27. Sad. It's sad when one has to leave home and be put in one of these institutions. Luckily, she's got family who keeps an eye on things and visits her regularly. By the way, cameras are a must in these places in order to detect cases of staff misbehavior towards these helpless senior people.

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  28. This is quite worrying. Not knowing the details (and not wanting to), it does seem as if many corners are being cut in care homes, in the name of profits. When visiting, people must always ask if residents are being treated correctly. Let's hope the answer is 'yes'.

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  29. I do hope Aunty Gladys settles in well. A care assistant role is very hard, underpaid, and you have to be a special sort of person to do it...no wonder there is a constant churn in staff at some places.

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  30. Glad to hear that Aunty Gladys - and the other residents of course - is being cared for so closely and carefully. I am sure that you will still go and visit her, and others will too. The collection of cards is a very good idea, I have always sent cards to anyone in a home, arranged for others to do so and even continued to send cards to those with dementia even if they have no idea who it is from any more, all to underline the point that there are people out there caring about this person. Plus I am sure that Aunty Gladys would love to have lots of post to show to her other visitors!

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  31. I have just read the link you posted and now I feel sick. I don't care how much people are paid, where is their humanity? How can anyone watch a vulnerable adult suffer and not do anything? These places cost a fortune and someone is crying with hunger. Awful.

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  32. So sad to hear that yet another home has failed in it's duty to care for the elderly. Moving home is traumatic and shouldn't have to happen to such a lovely lady. Hope for her sake the next one is top notch!

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  34. Let's hope that Gladys gets a lovely, clean and peaceful room in which to see out her days in contentment. It is mind boggling that so many care homes have closed when this country obviously needs more care homes - not less.

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  35. Difficult decisions for her family, and unsettling for Gladys, so I do hope the transition is smooth and the new home is really to her liking. Will it make it much more difficult for you to visit her, John? An Easter card will wend its way from New Zealand once I know the address!

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  36. I'm glad Auntie Glady's family kept a watchful eye. I hope her transition goes smooth. She is such a sweet, lovely person.

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  37. Best to your Auntie and family. I'm glad someone was watching and I hope the new arrangements are much better for her.

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  38. Yes, please post Auntie Glady's address. I would love to send her a card.

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  39. We had a big local scandal about a home near us recently that social services closed down , when you read the full report it seemed they had lots of paperwork breeches and nothing that affected the residents who always seemed happy and well cared for

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  40. Very disturbing. Your thoughts of generating many cards to show that she is important to many is a good one.

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  41. My mother in law had Alzheimers. When she was first put into a "facility", it was after she had managed to unlock several locks on the front door and walk a few blocks in her nightgown until the police saw her.. like a good child, she told them her address and explained that her mother was going to worry about her.
    it is heartbreaking and horrifying ... a long goodbye someone called it.
    I made my children promise that they would not put me in a care home, just put me on an iceberg out there somewhere ..

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  42. Not ever good news to hear.
    We have it happening sometimes here in the states.
    Not happy about it!
    Care for the elderly, for each, all, in CARE homes should at the very least be ultimate in kindness, cleanliness, support.
    I am happy it was reported and they are being held accountable.
    I hope the move for Gladys goes smoothly.

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  43. Can we send cards from overseas?
    I must have your address somewhere!
    Helen

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  44. It is unconscionable that such blatant abuse can take place. It happens here with alarming regularity - if we only treasured our elderly, instead of marginalizing them. Yes - please let us know of your auntie's new address. She will get loads of love and support from all over the globe! They better treat her accordingly...

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  45. It's heartbreaking to have to leave your (my) mother (or other loved ones) in the care of "professionals". I'm happy to know that you & others have their eyes on the care of Gladys & others who are loved, and that she & they are being moved where they will be taken better care of.

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  46. When I was in the rehab facility last year, half of the facility was for long-term care patients. I saw first-hand the problems of dementia and needs of patients who had nothing more than each other for companionship on a daily basis. Their families now merrily move on with their lives, and leave their loved-ones in a locked facility and visit once a month if they are the lucky ones. In the daytime the attention to care was stellar but after night fell, not so much. I hope I'm one of the 'lucky' ones and never have to live out my days in one of those care homes.
    Lets hope that aunty Glad gets the care and attention she so deserves.
    ~Jo

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