Friday, 31 March 2017

Retirement

" You're not old enough" 
" You'll be bored" 
"Really?" 
" What are you going to do with yourself?"
These are some of the reactions I have had from people when they hear that I am due to retire from nursing in August this year.
I've even had a lecture on just how the baby boomers should have paid more tax throughout their working lives from one person and a thinly veiled snort of disgust from another who equates retirement with waiting-to- die, old lady behaviours. 
Envy, resentment and irritation, I can understand, for many of the younger workforce coming through the system,  have to work until they are 65 before they can leave but the generalised negativity I have felt about Early retirement has surprised me.

I have worked since I was eighteen. Two years as a bank clerk, thirty five years as a nurse. I've trained four and a half years as a student nurse in mental health and general nursing and have spent another year specialist training in high dependency and spinal injury nursing. 
I have worked as a ward manager on an acute Spinal Injury Unit, facilitated good practice within sexual health care and like many of the specialised staff on rehabilitation units all over the world worked long unpaid hours providing extracurricular care to patients, many of which became firm friends.
I have also worked part of most weekends as an intensive care nurse for  over a decade.

I have mentoured, guided, disciplined and supported more staff than I care to remember and I have provided end of life care to patients and their families over a hundred times during long sad shifts.

I have been spat at, punched and slapped by patients and their family members.I have worked night shifts, Christmas days and most public holidays and have not had a pay rise for the past few years.
As a manager, I fought fires on a daily basis

And so I am looking forward to my retirement. 
I think I deserve it.

I hope to work occasionally, perhaps in the local hospice, a place which is more suited to my skills and experience, but retirement will ostensibly free up our weekends to do other things. 

Relatively soon we will move on from the village to pastures new. The Prof will blossom further up in his academic world and there are so many new things to do  learn, experience, travel to and enjoy.
I will also write my book, 

I may even have time to support Mary in some puppy care
It's time to move on.





142 comments:

  1. Go for it! Make your own choices, do what you want to do. You have such a full life outside of work, that you will stay busy. You will always be a caregiver, it is a part of who you are.

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  2. I retired at 56. If I hadn't retired my job would have killed me. I had run out of fuel. No doubt there are some jobs where day to day pressures are pretty easy to bear but in frontline services like nursing there's no hiding place. Thus, I applaud you for taking early retirement. Perhaps such packages won't be there for future generations but that is not your fault. Step forward into a happy, healthy retirement with your head held high. I can't imagine that you would ever be bored and I think it is great that you are already considering voluntary work in a hospice. Hospices need genuine, caring men like you.

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    1. Yep, I agree with YP. I was 57 and was hating the job I once loved. Leave before you burn out.

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    2. The movie Network, written by Paddy Chievesky, had played out network anchor annouce he was going to kill himself on the air because he'd run out of bullshit.
      I, too, have just run out of bullshit. My own and my tolerance for everyone else's.

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  3. Just as well you are not a road worker with a bad back. Truly though, people who don't work in a stressful occupation will never understand why you can't do it past a certain age. Fat cats who sit on the arses all day may well be able to work into quite old age. For some, their job is just too hard in their older years. Yes, sensitive spot for me.

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  4. John, you have made a wise life style choice. I retired at the tender age of 48 and have never looked back, although after a few years I did retrain in Awareness Education.

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  5. Good for you, John. Retirement is not the end of active life, it just marks the transition to a new and interesting stage. I'm sure you'll love every minute of it.

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  6. So envious of your retirement, but not envious about you leaving the village. Think I would want to stay there forever and ever. Onwards and upwards for you though - lots of luck in starting your new adventures.

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  7. YOU have a full life and will do well in retirement.

    my in-laws retired, sat on their arses, watched hate tv, and died early. don't be like them.

    I am still working full time at age 62.5 and I like it.

    there is no "one size fits all"; fly, john, fly!

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    1. You want him to become a flight attendant? He'd be too clumsy for that Anne-Marie. Passengers would be drenched with hot coffee and his crocs would not fit the uniform code.

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    2. bwhahahahaha! good one, YP! nope, I just want john and the prof to be happy in their next adventure.

      the dogs and pj bottoms would not be allowed in the uniform code either.

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  8. To hell with the nay-sayers John, you've damn well earned it and I'm sure you're looking forward to it.
    The earliest I can draw my University pension is at 55, and I have every intention of doing exactly that. I work to live, not the other way round...

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  9. Absolutely! ...and you will LOVE it ! No more rushing and pushing yourself but time to organise your life and have some fun times without your working hours clashing. Do you have any idea where you will move on to? Will you be able to take the dogs with you?

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  10. I hope you enjoy it. I look forward to your adventures and the book!

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  11. You will be fine. I retired at 58 and 20 years later have a full and fine life. The people who have problems are those who sit home with nothing to do and never see anyone. You have so many interests that you will soon wonder how you ever had time to work. Onward and upward!
    Cheers Peter

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  12. You have had a long and productive career and I congratulate you on it. Having said that, you don't need to list your achievements to justify retirement. You worked, you can retire, you want to retire, it's nobody's business but yours.
    Go and reclaim your weekends!

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    Replies
    1. let me modify that to say you work, not you worked

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  13. As one forced into early retirement due to to three spinal cord injuries I was not prepared at all for that big of a change. BUT you sound as if you have a handle and a plan on the new mixed use of time.

    Good roads and travel them well.

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  14. Good on You. People forget when they envy others a part of their life. If they want that part they have to take the whole of it. Because it's that accumulated life experience that make the final product. I do hope you have a long and very enjoyable retirement full of adventures and doing all the things you and your Husband enjoy.

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  15. 'Retired' from the rat race of daily commute, big corporation, work harder-earn more-spend more two years ago and I've never regretted it. I'm now self employed and work part-time when I want. Like you I faced disbelief, incredulity and questions like 'what will you do all day' - not from those who knew me well.

    Some people genuinely have no hobbies or interests outside work; some would rather be at work than spend more time at home in an unhappy atmosphere; some can't afford to retire (or think they can't). I'm sorry for them. Life is short and every day is for living! I look forward to hearing even more of the daily life in the village.

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  16. Enjoy! And lest you should find yourself to be a little bored someday - as if with all the doggies to keep you company! - I published a great long list of things to do on my blog today that my readers provided a few weeks ago. Little chance of anyone getting bored I would say!! You have worked long and hard, so enjoy!!!

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  17. People are likely just jealous of you being able to retire, or have a twisted sense of working yourself into the ground before you can catch a break. I'd say you more than deserve it! My husband and I are four years away from when we can retire. He'd go tomorrow if he could. Burn out is a very real thing. And the people who question, "What will you do with yourself?" obviously do not read your blog! -Jenn

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  18. You're entitled to retirement, and I highly doubt, from reading your blog, that it will be Waiting To Die retirement.

    I've a feeling you've got much to do.

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    Replies
    1. LOL, Yes ! You will wish you were working again so you could get some rest lol

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  19. Yes indeed . .
    Knowing when . . . only we know when . . .
    Decision made . . .
    Exciting days ahead . . .

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  20. 67 John, 67. Although there is no way I'm going to be in nursing at that point. I'll be working in Tescos or similar waiting until I can claim my pension.

    I do envy you, but not resent you. I'd go tomorrow if I could and i'm only 40. not because I no longer enjoy the patient contact, but because I just can't see anything other than doom on the horizon.

    Not for you though, you swine!! I'm looking forward to following your adventures as a man of leisure.

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  21. Enjoy, John. My hubby took early retirement & now has been retired longer than he worked. He has enjoyed every minute & deserved it! So sally (?) forth, John, & have many happy new adventures!

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  22. Good Lord, yes. It's time.

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  23. I'm the same age as you. I've no pension pot and two teenagers with big ambitions. (I had my children after 40.) I've always done things I believe in and care about, largely in the charity sector, hence no pension pot. (I worked in charities in the days when you were paid barely minimum wage!) I'm now starting new small businesses, doing the things I love. I work hard, but because it is on my terms, it doesn't feel like it. Most importantly, I am around for the kids. They'll be off soon!
    I'm sure you'll love retirement. And I'm sure you'll wonder how you ever had the time to go into work.
    I'll be fascinated to see where the move (which is obviously on the cards) takes you.

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  24. I am trying to persuade my hubby to retire as his health is suffering, but he's fighting me on it; guess it's just not that time yet...

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  25. Retirement is brilliant enjoy it there is many don't get there x

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  26. I am in awe of how much you have given to the community, John, and I think it is right that you now stop before you suffer burn out, although I have no doubt that you will still help people out because that is just the person you are. x

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  27. You will be so happy, matey, trust me.

    I always planned to retire at 55, but my back gave out at 53. Ah well, 34 years of mostly ICU nursing ain't bad. Thank goodness they don't make little girl nurses do all the lifting these days.

    Even with my various health problems, I am thoroughly enjoying retirement (as is my partner), and I'm guessing you will too.

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  28. You have earned it! You have paid your dues. And you will love retirement! I worked part time as a teen and full time there after. When I retired I never looked back. I earned it.

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  29. You've worked hard for it John. Ignore other people's jealousy. I'm looking to finish in 2 years and like you have worked nights, weekends and long hours. It takes its toil - life is too short - as you know only too well xxxx

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  30. Absolutely, RETIRE! Have a blast..you deserve it! Have bought 3 horses since I retired and am back to horseback riding again. Life is too short to work!

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  31. Sit back put your feet up, enjoy life.

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  32. Hooray for you! How wonderful!

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  33. Retirement gives you the freedom to do whatever you want. You don't strike me as someone who gets easily bored!

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  34. Several of my family retired "early". Some by choice. Others by surprise. None were bored. In fact, each became much busier in retirement. You'll enjoy yours! Well deserved. And I'll be among many to buy your book.

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  35. Where do you fancy living? and what will happen to the flower show without you?
    I can't imagine you ever being bored wherever you are, just hope you don't have our luck.......early retirement followed closely by ill health.
    As you say often Hey Ho!

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  36. I think a lot of the people with so much negativity about someone retiring is based on their own frustrations and inability to retire when they want to.
    My husband worked past retirement age because his work was not grueling but then one day, after someone made us an offer we could not refuse ( sale of house) .. we began our new lives. And they were damned fine lives, travel/live wherever we wanted to .. do whatever we wanted to for as long as we wished.
    He Never looked back ..
    I just wish retirement age was younger and that people realized how much money they have to save so they actually can stop working and do what they please. Too many people keep working because they can't afford that big old house and all the "things" they acquired when they worked ... most things that most people want to get rid of eventually.
    I hope you retire very soon ... just think of all the hours in the day that will belong to you :)

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  37. Trelawnyd will certainly miss you, John, when the time comes.

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  38. You'll hear NO criticism of early retirement from me! Anyone who can retire early is a lucky duck! Good for you!

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  39. Sad that we feel we have to justify to some the life-changing decisions we make,eh?
    John, there is a whole world out there waiting for you. Enjoy every second.

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  40. Retire, anyone who works within care gets burnt out, I know I did. Like you, I loved it and did not resent a minute spent with my patients. However, I too was spat on, thumped and kicked more than once. Physically and mentally it is just pure hard work, no one forces us to do it, but nevertheless it is gruelling as well as life affirming. I retired at 59 as I had a stroke, much better now and really enjoying those wonderful moments to do what I want to do. No more early calls and a nap whenever I need one. I have seen my youngest grandchild grow I missed out on the others as I was working full time. Go for it, you will not regret it. Love Andie xxx

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  41. I had worked since i was 16... all of it in customer service....work was not my life... i worked to have a life... i had many interests outside of work that i could happily indulge in when i no longer worked... HOnestly i feel sorry for the people who cannot imagine what you will do in retirement...seriously..? Will it take some adjusting? sure but i bet you will figure it out John.. :) Hugs! deb

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  42. John, my Mum was (is, nurses never fully retire!) a nurse for 30+ years retiring in her mid fifties. She received the same comments you are. She worked damn hard retiring as nursing supervisor. You darn well earned your retirement John!
    Robin

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  43. How exciting, I know you are going to love filling in blanks the job will leave with new and exciting things to do. Enjoy... and don't let anyone poop on your parade!

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  44. Good for you!
    After working flat out for forty years in a demanding and resposible job I felt I had earned my retirement and I haven't missed work for a single moment. In fact I wish I had retired sooner. I'm sure you will feel the same. I hope so anyway.

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  45. "To every thing there is a season, and a time to every purpose under the heaven" Ecclesiastes 3:2

    "I will also write my book" good news indeed.

    Sandy

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  46. You have certainly earned your retirement. Life goes by so fast you should enjoy your new free time and the changes to come.

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  47. full retirement here currently is 66 which I reached last year. I consider myself semi-retired in that I have always been self employed so by that I mean I'm not looking for work but will do what work comes in. anyway, this is not the first time you have mentioned moving on from the village. I find that curious, that you would want to move away to elsewhere since you seem to have such a rich life there.

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  48. John - you have more than earned retirement - and you will enjoy it.
    As to moving on - do try to persuade the Prof to apply to jobs up this way - I would love to live next door to you.

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    1. What even when he's playing his Showaddywaddy albums late at night?

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    2. So agree with Weaver, Retire now if you can. I think you will be even more busy that before.

      cheers, parsnip and thehamish

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    3. ABBA (runs screaming from the room)

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  49. Good for you, John. You deserve it and you have earned it. I hope that you enjoy this new journey in your life. You have done more good in the world that most and I hope that you have a very relaxing and happy retirement.

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  50. You don't need to explain anything to anyone. And all of us out here in the blogosphere look forward to your next adventures!

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  51. It's worked for me pretty well, esp. the travel part. I do admit that during the long winter I sometimes can't remember what day of the week it is......

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    1. That happens to me too lol .. although I am not actually retired .. the sort of work I did was here and there , now and then, but now that no one is working, the days do blend together sometimes.

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  52. My husband retired three years ago at 55. Since then he has started an OU course, written songs, played golf, tennis etc. He's having a grand time. But of course, that isn't the fashion, is it? The catch-phrase at present seems to be 'busy, busy, busy'.

    What was your journey from bank clerk to nurse, John?

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    1. It was easy.......i hated bank work and a group of patients from the local psychiatric day hospital used to come in with their carers to be taught life skills.....thats why I wanted to be a mental nurse

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  53. Ignore the naysayers; it's between you and The Prof. Nursing is a very arduous, onerous, job. Your retirement is well deserved.

    I started teaching at 21, resigning at 49, in order to become a full-time carer/quasi nurse for Dad. When that hellish decade finished, my life resembled a smoking ruin. Your blog has helped me to start picking up the pieces.

    You'll write a great book, John; might need a bit of help with spelling though!

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    1. Ive never been able to spell...want to be my proof reader?

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  54. wait, wait. you're gonna MOVE?????? can your followers get a chance to input???? i have always enjoyed your animal farm!!!!

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    1. Not for a while my dear,...but it will happen

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  55. Do it and pay no attention!

    You've given in ways most would not understand nor care to attempt.

    Just don't stop blogging please! It's a daily dose of laughter, whimsy and friendship.

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  56. I always think of you as semi-retired anyway.

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  57. Do it John, and enjoy your life! The naysayers are just jealous! And your lucky readers (me included) can look forward to more blog posts....right?!

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  58. Absolutely, retire on YOUR calendar, not someone else's. Retirement is wonderful and can be be a full, productive, rewarding time of life. I suspect the naysayers are envious. You've earned it, enjoy it.

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  59. Retirement is a time of great rediscovery.You're going to rediscover yourself and your needs, and rediscover your friends, family, acquaintances.
    Sometimes you'll be heavily disappointed, especially when it comes to friends and family.You 'll feel they're not there for you, they'll not raise a finger for you. If so, don't waist another minute on them. Life is short, concentrate on your well-being.

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  60. John love, you go for it pet. My other half hopes to retire as soon as we sell our house. We are planning on buying something considerably cheaper and drastically altering our lifestyle in order that we can enjoy retirement. Life is so very short and you have really got to make the most of every second.

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  61. You might find that after you retire, you are even busier than before :)
    All those places to go, things to do, people to see... the earlier you can manage the better, imo. Live and Have Fun ..

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  62. I sincerely doubt you will ever be bored. Or boring. Good for you!

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  63. Firstly I think the nay sayers are jealous and secondly sad cos they know they'll miss you.
    Looking forward to reading about your plans 😀

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  64. Nursing is a lifetime occupation .. heh.
    And am guessing that you will never be bored.

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  65. You definitely deserve to retire. That was a very high stress (albeit rewarding) profession and I think people burn out fast in it. Fresh roads to travel ahead. God speed.

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  66. I'm happy for you. You have given richly of yourself and your corner of the world is better for it.

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  67. It is time for you to move on. You've done your bit and then some and you're still fairly young enough to enjoy a life of your own with the Prof and the beasties. Can't wait for the book!

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  68. From reading your blog, John, I know that you will find plenty of things to occupy your time with LOL After so many years caring for the sick you most definitely deserve a long and happy retirement!
    My hubby is actually retiring today. He has worked since leaving school, with only a very brief stint of unemployment at 17 when the company he worked for moved to another part of the country. For the last 39 years he has worked in the rail industry ~ and no, he wasn't responsible for how the trains run! His job the last few years has been stressful, and coupled with commuting into London by train and underground every day, he is ready to now walk away from it all. He is looking forward retirement and has plenty of things planned to keep him occupied :)

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    1. Sending him my best xxx

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  69. Abso-bloody-lutely John. Your days will always be full in one way or another....I do wonder where you will move to?

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    1. Fwho knows libby ? Its up to the Prof to be offered the next job onwards and upwards

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  70. it will be sad thing to lose you both from the village

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    1. Oh and don't put your feet up - the third age is something we've enjoyed for a number of years, there's always plenty to do or see.

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    2. Thats kind of you to say ian

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  71. You are going to have a great time in retirement. I volunteer with a wonderful retired OR nurse who works with one Hospice patient at a time. She and I both volunteer at our American Cancer Society thrift store, and she plays with antique cars too. You never know what's going to happen in retirement.

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  72. Good on you !
    You will have a great adventure.
    My husband retired at age 55
    after 35 years with the same company.
    I'm so glad he did. We had time to play
    and have our adventures before he started
    to decline with Alzheimer's.
    It would have been to late if he had
    waited for the traditional age of retirement.
    Have a wonderful time with the people you love.
    You just never know............

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    Replies
    1. I want good healthq after retirement,...so many people like my dad did not

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  73. You absolutely deserve it John and I hope you have a grand time! (I'm still going to be jealous though) :-)

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  74. I'm surprised about the negativity. I'm always so happy for people when they get to retire. Congratulations! You have earned it. I hope that when you and the Prof move, you will still keep the dogs, right? Surely, yes. I hope you will continue blogging as well. I look forward to your posts every day. :D <3

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  75. Congratulations on your well deserved retirement...you will be quite busy working on your book and then embarking on a book tour....to the United States - the West Coast of Florida, specifically!! I'm sad to hear that you will be leaving that adorable village but I know you, the Prof and all the animals will settle beautifully wherever you land.

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  76. Like Rachel, I think of you as semi-retired already. It should make your transition to full retirement that much easier. Anyone with lots of interests will never be bored by having more time to pursue them. A book? Yes!!

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  77. I think you're a lucky duck. If I could retire tomorrow, I would. Unfortunately I can't for another three years, when I will be nearly 67, and not even on my birthday. They're making me wait another 9 months for retirement day to come around. Cry Freedom, I say and take the Retirement Baton and run with it. I would if I had the financial security.

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  78. You owe no one and explanation. Go for it! Time passes so quickly once you retire. No more watching a clock. It's Monday, Then the weekend before you know it!

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  79. John, I am also retiring early (age 58) in just 3 months. I am so looking forward to it! I'm nervous as hell, since health care is in such a tenuous state in the US, but I'm doing it anyway.

    I know you'll thrive wherever you are, and whatever you are doing. This will give you more time for so many other pursuits. Yay for us!

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  80. Wishing you good luck in your retirement John! I would retire tomorrow if I could but my reitrement age is 67! And bored? Never!

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  81. You deserve this one, darling. Enjoy every minute of it, it's a precious time, retiring. It's almost like becoming young again, because you get to do some of the things you would have done then, only now you know how to really enjoy them.

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  82. People asked the same sort of silly questions when Jenny was about to retire in 2015. She hasn't been bored for a second. She's found all sorts of other interesting things to do and her diary is always full. She hasn't once regretted giving up her extremely demanding academic job, and was glad to get shot of it.

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  83. Congratulations on being able to retire while you're still young and crunchy!! Nothing wrong with that. BUT! Am I really the only one around here who feels pouty because you will leave Trelawnyd? I see, of course, your side of it. It's just life. And it will be good, I'm sure. But being one of your blog readers I have come to see Trelawnyd as my 'cosy spot' despite the occasional mentioning of bin liners in someone's window. I'm feeling nostalgic about the place. And although I wish you nothing but good luck with your move, I can't help but saying: "Awwwwwwww, man!"

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    1. Its not a planned move ....but its on the cards

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  84. Bravo to you, Sir. I am 61 years old today, although on the internet I've been 39 for at least 20 years give or take. I was supposed to retire TODAY, but my replacement wasn't announced until Wednesday although I gave them almost 8 weeks notice. It wouldn't be fair to just throw her in, as has been done to me many times, so I said I'd stick around a week or two, whatever they needed. What the heck, another couple thousand in my pocket.
    Someone asked me how long I'd been planning to retire and I told them 45 years. Sad but true.
    I am a dinosaur, now. I remember when business had class. When it was as much about using experience, taking a chance and having fun as it was about money, money and more money. Walmart has ruined the world. Now, everybody works like they do, beating you down for price, threatening to drop you as a supplier unless you capitulate and acquiesce to their bullying tactics, purposely holding back commitments and critical information until it jeopardizes your ability to deliver goods on time. And then fining you when you can't deliver on time, regardless if it was their fault or yours. At my last job I said it would be cheaper to give Walmart $250,000 one year and tell them to buy the stuff from someone else. I said within two years we'd be the only manufacturer left and we could put the price back up, again. Ofcourse, they would NEVER do it and how could I suggest such a ridiculous thing yadda yadda yadda. I have consistently told my son I want to see 3 things before I die:
    1. I want to see him bald because he ribbed me mercilessly about losing my hair, although his birth seemed to accelerate the whole process.
    2. I want to see Walmart fall.
    3. I want to live long enough to be a burden to him.
    Hey, I told him upfront, years in advance. He should start planning now.

    I'm worried about money. I can't collect US (un)social (in)security for another year, until I'm 62. I saved up money to buy an old car. Last year I decided, instead, to buy an old Carl another year of retirement with that money. I'll use the saved up car money along with an annuity check I receive every month, along with dividends and gains on mutual funds and stocks. I will get by, certainly until March 2018 when I will start receiving social security, (t)Rump willing. People ask me what I'll do if I run out of money. I tell them "internet porn". That shuts them up.
    So, if I may say from one Dinosaur to another, let us venture forth to the next stage of life. You know, I've realized that I'm 3/4 done with this folly called life. I come on like an old curmudgeon fusspot and sometimes I am, but I love madly, give fully and foolishly, and I'd rather shed a tear of sorrow than live a life of platonic indifference.
    I hope you write about your book. I will buy a copy of it when you tell us it is done and has been printed. It will be like visiting old friends. And, if the writing thing doesn't work out, remember...there's always internet porn.


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    1. I LOVE internet porn; 2 hairy bears in the woods meet and...
      :)

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    2. Loved reading that Carlnepa. X

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    3. Carlnepa see below

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    4. I'm 71 and let me tell you it is hard. I was lucky to have bought my car and home so I do not have to worry about that but I am careful with my spending.

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  85. Your life, your choices.
    Where are you moving? Or is it sa secret.

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  86. At least your friends believe you are good looking enough for porn...mine wouldnt

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  87. I worked 42 years, 34 in the "death care" industry...believe me, you are going to love retirement! I've been retired nearly a year and I still have a difficult time planning ahead...being "on call" my whole career has scarred me...but I'm loving every single moment of not working ajob! And I will learn to be spontaneous, if it kills me!

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  88. Bloody hell didnt expect so many comments ! Thank you all for commentating and apologies that i have not answered them all! Just played badminton with the Prof and dispite my size I beat him 3-0
    Off to lie down with oxygen now xxxxx

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  89. I rejoiced when I retired, free at last to do exactly what I want to do. Go for it John, it all sounds very exciting.

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  90. Can't imagine working now BUT I hope you won't be retiring from your blog

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  91. Never! Ive been writing this shit since 2006!

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    Replies
    1. Have you considered turning the blog into a book, or do you aspire to write, say, a novel?

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    2. No i think most of the blog could end up as a mediocre book

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  92. You've earned a long and happy retirement many times over. I for one can't wait for that book 😊

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  93. Congrats John. I retired at 52, will be 67 in three weeks and still going strong.

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  94. I retired at 58 and it was the best thing for me and yes there were negative comments. "How could I give up that kind of job." The truth was and is,it was easy. I am much happier.
    Rock on!
    Jane in Ontario

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  95. My friends and I have worked non stop in the hospital for 30 plus years. We dream of winning Lotto and being able to quit in retire. Endless shifts and on call have worn us out.

    So good on you. Even joy every moment.

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  96. I am retiring in august too. Though i will be 67. So looking forward to the new. Have a blast and enjoy yourself...it only gets better.

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  97. Hi John - my dear Dad retired about 9 months before he turned 60 (his workplace shut down),=. Within a couple of months he was saying "I don't know how I ever had time to work". 27 years later, at 86 he may have slowed down physically but his brain is still active; currently he is co-ordinating the translation into umpty-something different languages and editing the users' manual for a Linux operating system while doing much of the housework too - at 86!

    You will have a great time, best wishes to you, the Prof, Albert and the dogs, Michelle in Wellington, NZ

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  98. As long as work wasn't your whole life, no-one needs to die or be bored when they stop. Whether it is fair to make people work till they are 65 is another thing. Here in Oz there was talk of making it 70. FFS! The whole point of the carrot of retirement is to get you to work your guts out, in many cases at some crappy souless job, all the rest of your active life with your eyes on that prize at the end. Not much point if they make you work till you are really, really to old to enjoy retirement. And they say slavery is dead!

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  99. Yay! Congratulations, John, to you! Enjoy, enjoy, enjoy the fruits of your hard work. I'm looking forward to reading your book!

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  100. Exciting about your new plans, although I'm sure you and the Prof will be much missed in Trelawnyd.

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  101. We. too, got those comments. "You're too young. Won't you be bored? What will you do all day?" What would we do all day? Live our lives. Retirement means you don't HAVE TO work anymore unless you want to. It doesn't mean you'll stop being useful or living an interesting life. My life has more variety, satisfaction, AND HAPPINESS now. I'm thrilled for you.

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  102. How exciting. Good luck and I KNOW you won't get bored. Looking forward to all the tales of where you will move to and the process. I can't wait to retire, still love the patients, but can't stand the silliness of the politics. x

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  103. You will enjoy every minute of retirement and wonder how you ever had time for a job!

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  104. You absolutely deserve it. Forget all those naysayers. And it's not like you won't be doing other things and, as you pointed out, working here and there in other ways. Our world RUNS partly on the talents and contributions of retired people, who are finally unchained from their desks (or jobs) and allowed to spend their time in more innovative, less profit-driven ways!

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  105. My OH is recently retired and although he enjoyed his job, feels like a weight has lifted off his shoulders. I think you've more than done your bit and deserve a long and exciting retirement. Best wishes to you and the prof. x

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  106. Deciding when and if to retire can be a very heavy decision. I have just observed one full year of retirement, and have found it swell.

    I wish the same to you! xo

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  107. You have earned your retirement!!
    Quite frankly, everyone can retire when they want and how they want. Some choose to never work again, others move onto a new chapter in life. I look forward to yours!

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  108. I retired at 55, and it has been wonderful. If you don't love what you're doing, and I did not, retired is good. Be happy!

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  109. I think you deserve your retirement!Are you thinking of moving because of the grumpy sod who has bought the field behind your cottage?

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  110. I retired 2 1/2 years ago and never looked back. I am so busy now, I don't know what I did before (worked!) but am doing things I love. Enjoy every minute of it.

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  111. I don't know how I missed this post! I have just turned 54 and am starting work again after 18 years as a stay at home Mum! I dread having people tell me what to do once more but I need the money. At least it is only part time so I will have to make the most of my free time. When do you think you will be leaving the village John and where do you think you will be moving too? Exciting times ahead for us all. x

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  112. Ooooh, I so envy you. My husband and I have more than enough money to retire (I run his office) and live like the animals (did you ever ask a squirrel what it would do with the rest of its' life? Animals just live - why is that so hard for humans?). Alas, dear darling loves his work - 26 hours a week, his own boss and a nice income. I, on the other hand, would like nothing better than to be free to putter and do what I want when I want to, but we've been joined at the hip for nearly 50 years now and he likes me by his side. I can't complain about that. You've worked hard - it's time for the next chapter. Enjoy!

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  113. I totally support you in your retirement and will live vicariously through you until I can retire early too.

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