Saturday, 30 January 2016

Village Meet ups

Snowdrops in the Churchyard

Finally, after Gertrude desposited another flurry of bad weather on the already soaked and dejected citizens of the United  Kingdom, we have been left with a sunny day.
Like extras from a spaghetti Western , the population of Trelawnyd seems to have stirred itself from hiding away behind closed doors ( after the bandidios have struck ) and could been seen pottering around their houses, and enjoying the weak sun.
Some, like Gay Gordon and Big Mary , just waved weakly like the ageing Queen Mother , from a bedroom window whilst the more energetic , like Mrs Trellis ( yes I have returned her to her more formal title) marched around the country lane in a new bobble hat.
I promised Mrs Trellis that I would pick her up at the garage on Wednesday morning. Apparantly she had a bit of a bump the in car negiotiating a sticky parking space at Blue's dog obedience classes. I wasn't quite sure if the classes were working because Blue was bouncing around on his lead as if he had been slipped an LSD tablet, but I didn't say anything.
I saw and spoke to Jo who was out with her new Whippet Lilly. Lilly is the most technology advanced animal in Trelawnyd as she has a satellite tracking system attached to her collar. This was ever since she escaped for five long hours and covered most of Denbighshire and parts of Flintshire in her bid to find home.
I didn't see Auntie Gladys but I am sure I glimpsed her duster flicking away the non existent dust from her window ornaments but I did stop and talk to Terry and Anne who warned me off any more verbal battles with the guy with the staffies who lives in the bin bag windowed hourse.
" Your not as young as you think you are " Terry warned " at our age something can give during a fracas"
I wondered what he meant ? Knowing my luck it would be my bowels.......,
Anyhow moving on.
Farmer Basil was out as was Gentleman farmer Ralph and the Polish guy from Well Street, all received waves as did the lady with dementia off Hight Street, who was sat polishing and repolishing the glass at her kitchen window and only a minute later I spied Margaret from Erw Wen, who asked me if I can look after ten of her hens on the Ukrainian Village. They arrive tomorrow, it will be lovely to have more life breathed back into
Anatevka.
More waving this time to Sailor John, Maureen from the Friendship group, Dr Barnsley and old Muvvie who always over revs her engine at T junctions and I were almost home with Mary and William, then it was out with slow coaches George and Winnie......we didn't go far, just to the Churchyard, but we did catch up with old Stan ( who is 90 and looks 70) and Trendy Carol before returning home at 10 .30am.

The Prof had just retuned from a Breakfast meeting up with a colleague.
" see many people when you were out" he asked
" Just a few" I replied




40 comments:

  1. I can't get over your writing skills....so satisfying! Good thing about blogging....saves time, the prof can read all about your day!

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  2. I bet there's loads of people you don't know.

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    1. Most infact rachael.....especially the wouking people Nd the ones with kids
      Thank you for reminding me

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    2. You know enough people to make you feel welcome and at home John, which is more than can be said for poor old Cro.! You are also a very friendly fellow, and you have dogs too, which is always a good way of meeting people. I've met many very nice people, and made friends, walking the dogs.

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  3. Love the snowdrops. I spotted some brave daffy already out here. x

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  4. Love the snowdrops. I spotted some brave daffy already out here. x

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  5. "Knowing my luck it would be my bowels" -- what a good laugh this line gave me!

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  6. a good day in the village; and SNOWDROPS! the only snowdrops I have are the ones deposited by last weekend's 30 inch storm.

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  7. I know all the people on my street. neener neener. All 3 houses of them lol ..
    I want to live in a village, although moving back to Buenos Aires has its appeal, maybe I will consider Treylawned, if I ever learn to pronounce it.
    Everyone could gossip about the American lady and her cats.

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    1. I have no snowdrops but I do have the top half of a tree that broke off in the storm the other night.

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    2. Go for it - I dare you !! Don't worry about pronouncing it, the locals will soon tell you how ! But you'll have to get a dog too.

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    3. Getting the dog is the easy part :)

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  8. Snowdrops, what a lovely treat in January! Nice to see you are having a good, productive day. Hens - at last!

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  9. I'll second Debra on this post! Gave me a good laugh during breakfast, thank you!

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  10. I love reading your blog John, It's Under Milkwood but with more laughs and in my opinion better nicknames x

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  11. Out and about and fresh air. We're having a warm and sunny day, after snow and rain the last two days. Mr. Wren is working on his nest in a studio window. The nest is fifteen years old and the first in his string on condos in the ravine.

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  12. All these lovely flowers that we desert people never see. It must be so beautiful on your walk and there they are.
    You have too much rain and we are counting the days till Monday hoping the latest storm drops down abit and Tucson will get some rain and snow.
    Thanks for the village update.

    cheers, parsnip and thehamish

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  13. Highly entertaining :) Instead of a TV series of your life, as some here have suggested, for some reason I keep picturing your village and your neighbours and all the animals in an animated version - today I could "see" the whippet tearing up the miles ... thanks to your powers of description.

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  14. That last remark to the Prof sounds a bit of a fib to me John after reading your post.

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    1. He always asks me weaver

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  15. I don't use the expression LOL because usually I suspect people aren't laughing at all and are just sitting there with a neutral expression on their face as they type LOL, but this post, the part about your bowels, literally did make me laugh out loud. You are a gifted writer and a genuinely witty guy! -Jenn

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  16. I was wondering how long you and the Prof have lived in Trelawnyd. You certainly have embraced and been embraced by all. What a treat to read about your village life.

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  18. An engaging account that paints a pleasant picture of life in Trelawnyd. It's like the proposal for a new radio soap opera. I wonder what it would be called and what theme music you might choose?

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  19. you say it's not an enchanted village but it sure sounds like one to me.

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  20. I always get a smile and a glow from reading your activities. John. And just now I realised that I really do live in a village too. It may be in the heart of the city, but I live four blocks from where I work, and as our car is in disgrace, I've been walking. It took me over an hour to get home yesterday, as I stopped to chat with so many people I know. Fellow shop or cafe owners, apartment dwellers, customers, friends(who are often one or all of the aforementioned also). It was really heart warming. But it also made me realise that driving to work (so I have the car for deliveries and pickups during the day)saves me a lot of time! ;-)

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  21. Sounds like a wonderful walk about

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  22. All caught up on howdy do's and wuz up's? Or very close to it! Great thing about small towns and villages :)

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  23. I love your village rambles and descriptions. So much more interesting than ''bosoms''. What happened to all you egg customers when you shut down the Ukrainian Village? I miss the hens and Bingley, etc.

    PS Thanks for the hint about the tracking device. My pug is an escape artist too. He s young and athletic and amazingly fast.

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  24. i always love it when you take a walk through the village.
    i even love it when you chase through it trying to find a beloved frightened goose.
    i hope mary and the goose have made friends now.

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  25. Love seeing the Snowdrops . . .
    And "the read" . . .
    You are such fun . . .

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  26. How fortunate you are to be greeted by so many. That is the way life used to be for me. Even though I live in a rural setting, it is more like suburbia where everyone pulls in their garage at night and does not come out till dawn and drives away.

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  27. That's pukka village life. You're lucky.

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  28. A wonderful thing about village life. Although we're in a city of 70,000+, our neighbourhood functions very much like a village and we often have the same kind of heartwarming experience. As for "something can give," bowels were my first thought. And that can happen at any age during a fracas. I really hate when people lump me in with their thinking "at out age"; I'd much rather live in denial. They're getting; I'm not!

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    1. And other than the fact that I typed "out" instead of "our" [age] and left out the word "old" after "They're getting," I don't think I did TOO bad a job!

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  29. Love the story of Lilly the whippet. Yes, I can forsee the bowels thing ahead of my Mr Him.

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  30. Your post this morning would make a wonderful, beautiful short story for one of the 19th century weekly booklet publications in a small city. Lovely, John. I felt that I, myself, was waving to your friends.

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  31. I'd give my eye teeth to live in that village

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