Wednesday, 24 June 2015

Food For Thought

Generally I am not too fussed with " modern art" but recently I was moved by the work of Eric Ravelo, who is a cuban artist. His photographs titled " The Untouchables" are incredibly powerful


"The first image refers to pedophilia in the Vatican. Second child sexual abuse in tourism in Thailand, and the third refers to the war in Syria. The fourth image refers to the trafficking of organs on the black market, where most of the victims are children from poor countries; fifth refers to weapons free in the U.S.. And finally, the sixth image refers to obesity, blaming the big fast food companies.

31 comments:

  1. I saw the images yesterday but got sidetracked before I could read more.
    Very powerful.
    Thanks for sharing them.

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  2. Powerful. Shameful.

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  3. Painful. Horrible. Truth.

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  4. Thank you for posting this as I have not seen it previously. Very powerful images.

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  5. Powerful and striking, also very relatable unusual in modern art

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  6. This is very hard to look at first thing in the morning, but five of them are the true horrors of this world. However, Ronald McDonald never forced his food on anyone. This is always a choice the individual makes and lives with the consequences. Besides, their fries are delish.

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  7. Those photos do pack a punch.

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  8. All a sad reminder of human nature.
    Even the junk food one, which shows the power of marketing and peer pressure.

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  9. sad thing is they all make sense and are happening somewhere in the world....

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  10. What is happening to the human race? These pictures are incredibly powerful but also very depressing.Evil seems to be taking control of this world.

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  11. I feel uncomfortable looking at them.

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  12. They do make me uncomfortable and heartsick. And, of course, that is the point. There is so much evil and poverty and disturbed minds in this world. And, wishing will not make the changes needed. We all need to understand each other and work together to combat such horrific evil.

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  13. We as humans give ourselves too much credit. As Edward O. Wilson wrote in THE CREATION, "humans are a mix of stone age emotions, medieval self-image and with godlike technology".

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  14. Powerful images, and it's sad they all represent something that is real, relevant and happening somewhere in the world at this very moment :-(

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  15. It doesn't speak to me one way or the other, except to be trying too hard. Maybe the first one, since the crucifix is what the pedophiles hid behind, is OK. And actually it could be powerful on its own. But the other images seem forced and detract from the impact of the first.

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  16. And what is it with the crucifixes anyway? Is the implication that only Catholics are to blame? Or perhaps that only Catholics are able to see what is wrong? Either way, the use of crucifix imagery makes it irrelevant to me.

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    Replies
    1. Part of the 'job description' for becoming a Catholic priest is to be unmarried. This has always caused them problems, and will continue to do so. This is not the case with most other 'mainstream religions.

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  17. My God, this is really something! (With a different reaction to that of Wilma's above) It's the 'crosses' - turned away, of course - though that's surely part of the 'message') that give this a real kick. Horribly troubling - and brilliant!

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  18. Interesting variation of a post, John. I find all of them accurate, probably the sequence should be altered if it's in order of harm to children. I'm guessing the wars in Syria and elsewhere have claimed more children's lives than the vatican can lay claim to...Though the vatican and catholic church have amassed a lot of victims over the centuries.
    Good, if not nice, post.

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  19. Very interesting powerful statements being made here.
    For me there is one missing. A parent with who who has many children for money and then abuses the child with indifference.

    cheers, parsnip

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  20. Powerful images indeed John.

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  21. I am impressed with the concept, which is very powerful and thought provoking, but think I would have preferred a different medium. Thanks for showing them. I don't know if I would have seen them if you hadn't.

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  22. Gosh John...quite striking.

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  23. food for thought indeed.

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  24. I am not joking when I say that I think that you cannot keep a good Christian down. I am not a Christian, but I know a few very good ones and I love them for it.

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  25. Powerful and sad.

    Love,
    Janie

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  26. I like the concept that these victims died for someone's sins. I also think what makes it disturbing/powerful is the fact the victims are all children. While me and everyone else on here are appalled by these horrible things happening, the one about Thailand horrifies me the most because I feel like it so out in the open and no one bats an eye. Humans can be incredibly cruel and vile.

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  27. Wow! Disturbing yet powerful...sad but unsettling...horrible but eyeopening...

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  28. As you know, I adore modern art. I hadn't come across Eric Ravelo before, but I love his photos. They're very powerful (and thought-provoking), as you say.

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  29. Thanks John, I haven't seen them before, a bit of thought has gone around in my head about them today whilst typing away at work. I find them pretentious and I don't get the point of the crucifix and in fact don't really hack them at all. I have all these examples of what he is saying in my own head but they do not fit the crucifix model so I have to say I don't know where the artist was coming from. x

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