Sunday, 11 January 2015

'a ne fait rien"


I do like my sayings
I am always spouting some little nugget of wisdom or another.....just ask Chris
I drive him mad with them
One of my favourite saying is to punctuate some common phrase with the line
" as my mother used to say"
Of course she never really said very much of note that I remember but one line that was common in the Gray household was the sentence
" San Fairy Ann"
Apparantly it is a corruption of the French for " it doesn't matter" though my mother always used it as a slightly watered down swear curse.....a kind of " san fairy Ann ..to you!"
I was only thinking of this today as the French rallied together to stick a collective finger up at Muslim extremists everywhere
" San fairy Ann to you All!"
" you do not matter"

43 comments:

  1. Amazing collective action here today. A million marchers can't be wrong!

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    1. I love it it's now become a celebration of the country!

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  2. good one! I will remember this,

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  3. My Dad used to say that too John, although he hasn't been with us for 13 years he lives on through his funny sayings we all still use.
    I think the term is very apt for what has happened in France, a great big up yours to the terrorists, from the rest of the world.
    Twiggy x

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    1. Where was your dad from twiggy?

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  4. Marine Le Pen wasn't invited. Il n' a pas important. Nor was her old man.

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    1. No matter. It has been a show of strength and resistance by the people.

      Here in Lincolnshire most statements start with; "Now then"!

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  5. "Well, let me tell you something..." always preceded a lecture or lesson from Mom.

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  6. Not only Muslim extremists...but those of any religion or political persuasion.
    If you lived in Kent, you could join the San Fairy Ann Cyling Club...a piece of useless information for you!
    In our house, my Nan was the purveyor of 'wisdom'. Whenever I did something of which she disapproved, her comment was preceded by 'If I were you...' How it used to drive me mad...and how I missed her when she was gone.

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    1. I love the name of the cycling club charlotte!
      San fairy ann would a&e an excellent blog bane don't you think?

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    2. It would have to be a good one, though!

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  7. The French response is amazing, isn't it?

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  8. Je suis feels like a right Charlie.

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    1. One of my favourites is: "We'll burn those bridges when we come to them."

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  9. My mother used to say - "I'm not buying those biscuits, they'll only get eaten."
    Another favourite was "Cough it up, it might be a gold watch". Still have no idea where she got that one from.
    As for the French - I have a lot of respect for their attitude. The masses aren't afraid to make themselves heard, unlike us......

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    1. Didn't 1 million people march in London against the Iraq war in 2003? It seemed that way.

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    2. Demonstrations today in Edinburgh, Glasgow and Aberdeen. Good v Evil.

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    3. And a small one in Trelawnyd

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    4. My mother used to say the gold watch thing! Another was " It's a bit black over Bill's mothers' " when the sky was dark in one direction.

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    5. It was always black over Bill's mother's when I was a kid, and I thought Bill's mother did live over there!
      When asked what there was for tea, my Mum used to say "a run round the table and a kick at the pantry door". The only 'swearing' she did was to utter "Blood and Stomach pills!".

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  10. What a week.
    My heart is with the French.
    I am not sure I would have ever read that paper but I will will stand up to support the right for them to print.

    cheers, parsnip

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  11. La vie est trop courte pour boire du mauvais vin.

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  12. The best response I've seen to the French terror attacks is a picture of a rifle and the caption "Ceci n'est pas une religion." (this isn't a religion)

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    1. And tge iconic photo of the crowds atop te statues

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  13. A round of cheers for the French. I hope we remembered to thank them for the Statue of Liberty.

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  14. 'My grandmother used to say.....' a lot of one-liners which I use on a regular basis.

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  15. I am a human being. I have no smart word for this. THIS IS WRONG and it SUCKS that it comes to this stupidity!!! March On Hold Hands. Read the Comics every day! I stand with you from across the ocean.Mary from Alabama

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  16. I'm living for the day when all these attacks stop. Je suis human.

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  17. Vive la France! We are with you!

    Jo in Auckland, NZ

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  18. My mum also used to say San fairy ann too John but my utmost favourite saying of hers when we as kids asked something like "mum where's are my shoes?" she would reply as quick as anything " under my arm hanging on a curl" then laugh at her own joke ....

    Jo in Auckland, NZ

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  19. Allons enfants de la patrie,
    Le jour de gloire est arrivé!
    Contre nous de la tyrannie
    L'etendard sanglant est levé!
    Entendez-vous dans les campagnes,
    Mugir ces féroces soldats?
    Ils viennent jusque dans nos bras
    Égorger nos fils, nos compagnes!

    Aux armes, citoyens!
    Formez vos bataillons!
    Marchons! Marchons!
    Qu'un sang impur
    Abreuve nos sillons!

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  20. My Dad, who did actually spend some time in France during the war, would say Same fairy ann. Which is roughly equivalent to Same hat different feather.

    Jean
    x

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  21. I'm late to the party, but honestly, "Ca ne fait rien" is total vanilla "It doesn't matter." For these times, "Je m'en fous" is what we need--"I don't give a fuck."

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  22. I grew up (in Llanrwst btw) hearing "sam fairy ann". Aged 18 I went to France to University, a first for my family, and heard the phrase "ça ne me fait rien" or 'I don't give a sh*t'.

    Growing up with a father and two brothers who idolised Monty Python (a whole sketch once acted out in a certain men's outfitters in Llandudno!!) - an often heard expression in our house was "If wit was sh*t - you'd be constipated"! Still makes me smile to this day!

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