Sunday, 2 June 2013

Baby Oaks





Last year, the Jubilee year, The Flower Show Committee supported the work and enterprise of the village Carnival Committee with a notable donation.
In return, they kindly passed over to us a box of Oak tree saplings from Prince Charles' Highgrove estate, the remainder of which had been earmarked for planting in a local " Jubilee Wood"
The ten saplings were a welcomed gift, as last Year's Flower Show Objective was to replant some native trees into the old Church Yard. Trees that had died away or which had been removed by some over zealous strimming by the local council workmen.
Too small and fragile to plant out in the more robust graveyard, I placed the tiny, bare sticks into my allotment for the winter and although  I was not that hopeful they would survive, given the dreadfully wet, cold and miserable time we had experienced over the past  year or so, strangely enough they have, albeit in varying stages of growth.
When they are strong enough, we will transplant the Jubilee Oaks to their final resting place surrounding St Michael's....a future reminder to the residents of Trelawnyd, that The Flower Show Woz here!



31 comments:

  1. royal trees - neat! I have a few oaks in the backyard; it is quite fun watching the squirrels go after the acorns.

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  2. That is wonderful, John! So glad to hear they have survived and are thriving. ♥

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  3. Acorn shells are the favourite toys of Jazz n Jewel. They would love to be somewhere with an avenue of oaks. I am glad that yours survived your winter.

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  4. The only other place I heard of planting trees from Highgrove was on the Archers!

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  5. That looks more like a Hawthorn than an Oak; but I'll believe you.

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    1. Well it said oak on the label cro.....
      Perhaps you are right.......the others look very oak leaf like to me

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  6. those trees have a great pedigree!

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  7. The royal connection doesn't do much for me but I love the fact that they are surviving so far and will be transplanted with love.

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  8. I guess they don't call them "Mighty Oaks" for nothing.

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  9. I sort of know what Cro means about Hawthorns, but I believe you too. Royal Oaks.

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  10. Our Arbor Day Foundation does the same thing! I got about a dozen bare sticks to plant in the ground, and today we have about eight little trees of varying sizes. The biggest must be 15 feet tall by now. I suspect the mighty oaks will grow more slowly, but isn't it amazing to think how long your little treelets will be beautifying the churchyard?

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  11. Well, there's posh!
    Jane x

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  12. 'From little acorns .....' as they say

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  13. Very lovely post today.
    Grow little trees grow !

    cheers, parsnip

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  14. I planted five acorns ten years ago and the little trees are now part of our mixed hedge. Unfortunately we couldn't separate them once they'd been in a bucket for six years so they're a bit of a clump now. Yours will be fine and strong too!

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  15. Oh im jumping up and down inside for joy for you and trelawnyd and those baby oaks!!!! YAY!!!!

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  16. What a nice idea. Did all the little sticks make it through the winter?

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  17. I plan to plant some oaks here one day as ours are all around the same sort of age so nice to have some "coming on" as it were. Having a little tree nursery to bring on trees is a great project. From little acorns mighty oaks grow!

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  18. There's something wonderfully optimistic about tiny saplings making it through all the weather our winter threw at us and even more so when one day they will become majestic Oaks.

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  19. You don't think of mighty oaks as once being tiny and vulnerable, but there's the proof! Glad they survived all the terrible weather.

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  20. It's amazing the way life makes it through the early stages. There are so many species whose infants look downright puny or have to go through some long, improbable procedure to make it. Oh well, (to take the long view) the fittest have survived - so they're probably not as puny as they look.

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  21. Once they get their roots established, those sprigs will grow, but it seems to take forever!

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  22. When you think about it John it is our National Tree and as it has survived here for hundred of years it must be more than used to the horrible weather we throw at it.

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  23. I rooting for the little trees!

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  24. They are very slow in growth but Oaks are such beautiful trees.

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  25. Looks just like my cilantro!

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  26. The future generations will thank your committee for these John and you all will go down into history.

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  27. Just stopping by to let you know I'm thinking about you. Hope today has been a better day.

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  28. What a wonderful way for your committee to put down some real roots in history.

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