Wednesday, 27 March 2013

When Russians Attack...


A delightful shot of my right buttock
Yesterday, I read with some sadness , of yet another fatal dog attack here in the Uk. The dogs involved were not illegal breeds, but they were dogs that are renowned for their aggression, strength and fighting abilities.
Despite my anthropomorphic tendencies, I am a firm believer that dogs have to be under control at all times.This can be a challenge with terriers, as they are excitable and robust little characters, but I have mastered the problem by always ensuring that in public anyhow they remain firmly on their leads.
I have no time for these people that enjoy keeping big aggressive dogs that they cannot be held safely out of any doggie conflict. In their case the dog is obviously controlling the owner.

Six years ago I was challenged by a group of  house dogs. I walked into the property of our dog breeder without checking if the coast was clear, and as I started to cross a small courtyard, ten barking dogs of all denomination cornered me against a wall.

I kept calm, ( though I have never felt so frightened in my life) and stood stock still as the dogs challenged me to run. Two Jack Russell terriers led the assault and kept the whole thing " excitable" by hysterically barking up into my face while a  massive 140 lb Russian terrier leaned forward and bit me three times on the thigh and arse.
If I had panicked I would, I am sure been subjected to the wrath of the entire pack, and could of suffered the fate of many that inadvertently spark off the real "animal" in a much loved household pet, but I remained annoyingly still and outwardly calm as the dogs continued to bay at me.
It was terrifying
My salvation eventually came in the guise of an elderly airedale bitch, who walked quietly through the throng to sniff at me. I judged quite rightly that she was a benign character and so I slowly grabbed her collar and positioned her between me and the Russian terrier who was building up for another bite fest.
She saved me, of that I have no doubt, and the whole episode taught me a great deal about being "stupid" when unknown dogs were concerned....especially when there is a sign on the gate that reads "do not enter"..........

Dogs , even beautifully trained ones exist in a world that is only millimetres away from the savage......and most of us forget this........

68 comments:

  1. Here in Thailand there are many dogs on the loose - mostly unowned wild dogs or temple dogs. They can be frightening - especially when you encounter them at night. I am always very wary. I shall keep your doggie thoughts in mind during my forthcoming visit to Sri Lanka where as well as dogs there can be nasty monkeys to circumnavigate. You cannot argue with a mean, yelping mutt but there's no way I want to be bitten. Many Thais say throw stones at them or hit them with a stick. A few weeks ago I simply yelled at a couple at the top of my voice and they slunk off. It's hard to know how they will react.

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    1. Rabies.....YP .......be careful x

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  2. I couldn't agree with you more, particularly as a terrier owner. Most breeds were bred to kill and, despite being the most loving dog with humans, one growl from another dog and Snippet will go for the jugular. We have so many incidents on the moor with idiots letting their town dogs career about attacking sheep and worrying ponies. They then just leave the sheep without informing anyone. Grrrr. Rant over but it's nice to hear you bringing it up.....was there vaseline smeared on the lens when you took the buttock portrait by the way? Very moody.

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    1. Steady Em.......I thought it would inflame some of you

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  3. Maybe there is an argument for re-introducing dog-licences? In my area, most of the most dangerous breeds are owned by people who are least qualified to own or control them, and many of them are dragged off with the dog, if it decides it wants to go somewhere else.

    There is one large Pit-Bull (legal) cross 'owned' by a homeless junkie woman (who probably justifies ownership for 'protection') and it has taken a dislike to me so that if it sees me coming from a mile off, it launches itself at me as I pass, and she only just manages to hang on to it. Recently, she has fitted it with a muzzle (probably forced to by police), but the last time I saw it, there was no muzzle fitted. I was in a car, though.

    That shot of your buttock was shocking - stretch-marks!

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    1. Too much information Thomas..... But those stretch marks are hair

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    2. Yeah, right - and my gut is relaxed muscle.

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  4. Having experienced a similar situation, I can fully identify with your terror. There's no doubt that you saved your hide by having the presence of mind to stand still, and of course the elderly airedale was a great help.
    What a truly horrifying experience!

    As for the photo - - - OUCH!!!!!

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  5. How did you escape...

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    1. The kennel owner eventually came out of the house ( not pleased with my behaviour) and ushered the dogs in

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  6. I hope something was done about the dogs... especially the Russian that bit you.

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    1. It was. My fault cathy.....usually I ring 5 minutes before arriving sothe dogs would be put away.....I should have remembered

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  7. ...and that is exactly why you are John the Dogs.

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  8. I have been bite before & have a high respect or should I say fear for dogs I do not know. I would think should anyone raise a had to me our Bandit would come to my aid. Did this breeder not know you were arriving and put there dogs under control?

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    1. My fault! I forgot to let her know I was there

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  9. Dogs, best friends, great responsibility. Irresponsible dog owners here are arrested daily. In certain areas of the city every malcontent has a big mean dog on a leash (or not) so that all who pass thinks he has a big d--k! Please! Hope your poor posterior has healed well and the Russian has been contained. I have a guard dog inherited when my son passed away. I am always, always aware that he has an inbred instinct that no amount of loving or treats will appease. In many ways it is most certainly a dogs world!

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  10. When we were at Uni my friend and I had to walk through a high sided alley to get to class. There was often a pack of dogs at the end of the alley, waiting to mug any unsuspecting passers by. We were terrified and would hang back until they wandered off. I'm sure they were all loving family pets as individuals, but together they reverted to pack mentality. Thankfully, I've never been bitten. Wasn't the woman concerned you would sue her ass off? (no pun intended).
    Jane x

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  11. What a horrifying experience. It always bothers me to see people walking their dogs around our sidewalks on those 'extension' leads that allow the dog to be yards away from the owner. They really have very little control.

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  12. I can only wonder where your mind was when you entered their area.

    I've had a dog all over me, when the normally sweet dog was asleep and I woke it by visiting the neighbor. Scary!

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  13. I once worked (very briefly) for a vet. He kept telling me that I needed to be more careful around strange dogs, since my only dog experience at that point was with my gentle, elderly, beloved cocker spaniel. I was WAY too quick to pet and kiss and love on any dog at the clinic and he said, "Some day you're going to get the sh*t bitten out of you, young lady!" Well, he was right. One day I went to check on a dog waking up from surgery and started (foolishly) petting her, and BAM! I had a bloody, bitten hand.

    I wised up a bit after that. And I never let the doc see the bite I had gotten. I had too much pride! :)

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  14. Also, glad you're ok John. That sounded like a nasty experience and I know firsthand how scary it can be when ONE dog is acting aggressive, much less a pack.

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    1. My underpants were ful of blood which I had to hide as I was so ashamed I had caused the problem in the first place

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  15. Yes John I couldn't agree more....dogs must be controlled by their owners at all times. It is up to the owners to evaluate any given situation and make the appropriate adjustment to their approach or what ever. We are in an 'off-leash' dog park pretty well every day with Sophie. 90% of the time is good. It's the 10% of dog owners who have no clue how to control their dog. And as you said it's the dog that is controlling the human in these cases. Some people just have no clue about dogs and how they ought to be trained.It is mandatory here to have all dogs licensed. This does help somewhat.
    We have something else in common John...I too was bit in the arse once by a Cocker Spaniel......ouch!!

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    1. Did you photograph it?

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    2. Fraid not! I was only 5 years old!!lol

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  16. Yes terriers- don't underestimate them folks. The vet I worked for said the only house he would not burgle would be one where a Jack Russell lived!

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    1. Once they start...they never stop!

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    2. Was that the vet's evening job?!

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  17. Good Lord John; I have your blog and snippet photo on my side bar of my blog of blogs I recommend....then this morning theres a literal bloody picture of your arse... do you want me to promote you in this way??? LOL

    anyhow, did Chris believe your story of the attack of the hound? ;p


    And I do agree with you - a responsible Animal owner knows what their animal is capable of doing and must protect others from that capability - what if you were a five year old child who couldnt read the sign but was coming to put up a nice may day basket of goodies for the neighbor? Owning animals that are trained or bred to be aggressive come with a moral responsibility if not just a legal one...

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    1. Of course he did.. He saw e bites!

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  18. Yes John, very sad story yesterday. There is nothing more terrifying than a pack of dogs - they are a pack animal and even the most benign pet (particularly the males I think) will gang up and attack in the right conditions.

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    1. Especially the massive Russian terrier

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  19. I do hope you put some bleach on that fanny wound!

    More seriously, I'm impressed at your presence of mind in the face of the ravening pack. However did you tamp down the instinct to GETHEHELLOUTOFHERE!!!?

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    1. If you say IM PUTTING BLEACH ON MY FANNY in Britain you would be arrested

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  20. That's what you get if you goad animals...

    When I was a mere slip of a lad, our neighbour had an orange mutt that had a prediliction for humping my leg. If I tried to push it down (the dog, you dirty bastards) it would snap. Many an afternoon was spent in the street outside my house, waiting for the ownere to come out with a broom to beat it off.

    Maybe that's why I don't get on with ginger people?

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  21. No bad dogs, only bad owners. Hmmmmm I have heard that somewhere before. Oh yes, Barbara Woodhouse RIP.

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    1. I always thought she was quite cruel to her dogs doc!

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    2. Oh I agree John and if I was her dog I would have bitten her arse. But I always agreed with her quote.

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  22. it's difficult but you did the right thing to stand very still...having been bitten several times when working for a vet I regret your bites, thankfully there weren't more of them

    I'm a firm believer in K9s always being on a leash when out of the house...poor Baron has never had the chance to run free (I did let him loose at a dog park once) which is a good thing considering he's a dachshund with a constant eye for small things that run, like squirrels, bunnies, cats, lizards

    have a good Wednesday John

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  23. That poor girl being mauled and killed by those dogs is so very sad. Alas I don't think any dog can ever be truly trusted...there is always the possibility of a dog 'turning' so to speak and they should always be on a lead when out, and your experience sounds very frightening. p.s. your right buttock looks quite petite John....

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    1. Trick of the light...in actual fact it's the size of an cows arse

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  24. I was bitten by dogs twice. Each time i did not show fear, and in one instance i had mistaken the dog for a neighbour's dog, the latter of whom was a kind, gentle animal. In the other instance, it was a dog i knew, and the owners were as astonished as i was when she bit me. I've been wary since then of dogs i don't know and have been known to cross the street to the other side in order to stay as far away as possible if i'm walking by.

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    1. There seems to be no rules Megan x

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  25. I have three Jack Russells....I think I might get a tattoo or two now....

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  26. I've worked in two rescues over the past 5 years and the only breed that I've ever been bitten by is Jack Russells. One hung off my knee once :-/ Never met an aggressive Staffy after caring for hundreds. I've even got a Staffy cross Rottweiler myself!

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    1. Do you work in trelogan Hannah
      I am sorry I have never asked you x

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    2. I used to, then I worked in the Prestatyn one for a few years. Quit that in December and now I work for myself as a writer!

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    3. What sort of things do you write?

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    4. Heeeere's me :-)

      http://ipad.appstorm.net/author/richardshannah/

      and

      http://iphone.appstorm.net/author/richardshannah/ (but not as often)

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    5. I am impressed Hannah.....ESP the zombie app

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    6. Haha, I thought you might like that one!

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  27. Yikers... Once when we lived in town, I was out walking my dog on leash as required. "Major" wonderful once in a lifetime furry friend, he was a large fella at nearly 100 lbs himself, a Boxer...we were jumped by three dogs, who were very angry and meant some serious harm... 2 big white German shepherds and a medium sized black dog. I was scared to death, Major took that pack on, the three of them. He never let one of them near me. The owner finally came running...her little daughter had let the dogs out of their house after Major and I passed it :O( go figure. She finally got her dogs under control. I was shaking so hard I could barely stand up to walk. But totally unharmed thanks to my dog. Dogs in a group/pack mentality isn't a good thing... whew...

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    1. I think Itis more frightening when you have a dog with you that you feel you have to protect x

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    2. Yes I agree! Especially when I was not capable of helping him out much, sighhh

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  28. Your experience and that horrific situation that happened with that fourteen year old girl, does make you realise that you have to be cautious.

    This is very saddening. I've always been a good dog.

    Penny the Jack Russell.

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  29. Russian Terriers are huge, poor guy. Now my very tiny Russian TOY terrier really doesn't have a mean bone towards anyone but sweaters although she is bossy...and funny enough Russian TOY terriers and Russian Terriers are really totally different breeds ... with the exception of being Russian. ~they haven't really got a lot in common ... but I digress. Was interesting to see another post about Russian breeds ... one thing is certain ...they really can be a bit of a pain in the butt. ;)

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    1. Hmm take that back they also have being a "terrier" in common and that too says a "mouthfull" ...don't it! Hee hee

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  30. My two can appear intimidating when they rush up to passing strangers. Of course they soon start their tail-wagging, and all becomes obvious that they're just being friendly. Even so, I sometimes wonder.

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  31. I LOVE Airedales. They are just so, smart. For terriers!

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  32. Years ago, my Jack Russell was attacked by two greyhounds when I was walking him on a lead. Unusually for a Jack Russell he was incredibly placid (nothing like the Jack Russell bitch that we'd had previously) - we got him from my uncle whose other dog was bullying him! The greyhounds were also on leads but being walked by a child who had no control over them.One picked him up and shook him around - he had awful injuries to his side, the other was trying to join in. The police were involved, but nothing was done about the dogs. From what I remember they were racing greyhounds and the owner said they must have mistaken him for a ' hare' - I'd like to think that things have improved in the years that have followed and something would now be done.

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    1. As a greyhound and lurcher owner myself (rescue dogs), I am saddened to hear of the awful attack on your JR ~ I would never allow a child to walk any dog! And as the dogs were racing greyhounds, I would have thought that commonsense dictate that they be muzzled out in public! Sadly it is usually the owners who give the various dog breeds their "bad" reputations *sigh*

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  33. Still reeling at the thought of bleach on my fanny!!!

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  34. You get the vote for the best comment x

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